GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The Brittany safety message video prompted me to post this question.

I am interested in a good quality riding suit like Aerostitch but reluctant to spend the money to buy one. I'm concerned a riding suit would be too hot or too uncomfortable for most riding and it would end up hanging on a hanger in the back of a closet.

One of the posters in the Brittany video mentioned that he always rides with a riding suit. I'm curious and would appreciate comments from those who have tried riding suits.

I live in Texas where the drought has brought almost unbearable hot days this summer so a riding suit would be impossible but I also take long trips to cooler climates and wonder if a riding suit would be a good idea.

I'm planning to leave October 1st to see the fall colors in VT and NH then ride all of New England. A riding suit might be comfortable on a trip like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
The Brittany safety message video prompted me to post this question.

I am interested in a good quality riding suit like Aerostitch but reluctant to spend the money to buy one. I'm concerned a riding suit would be too hot or too uncomfortable for most riding and it would end up hanging on a hanger in the back of a closet.

One of the posters in the Brittany video mentioned that he always rides with a riding suit. I'm curious and would appreciate comments from those who have tried riding suits.

I live in Texas where the drought has brought almost unbearable hot days this summer so a riding suit would be impossible but I also take long trips to cooler climates and wonder if a riding suit would be a good idea.

I'm planning to leave October 1st to see the fall colors in VT and NH then ride all of New England. A riding suit might be comfortable on a trip like this.
I'm a Texan expat living in Tucson. I still ride in Texas, I would say close to half my rides end up traveling on the mother soil and I wear a riding suit year around. A good one with the correct under garments will keep you warmer in the cold and cooler when it is hot. BTW, I will not throw a leg over, even for a 7/11 run, with out suiting up.

The 'Stitch is a good suit if you want a one piece and they make some nice two piece suits as well. I wear a two piece Motoport stretch Kelvar Ultra II, have it in Kelvar mesh as well. Either Motoport or Aerostitch will serve you well.

I have no experience with the 'Stitch but some folks say they can get hot above 85F, my Motoport works at any temp. The Motoport offers the best protection of any riding suit in its "quad-armor" and Kelvar and while they come in basic styles each suit is custom cut and fitted.

If you happen to "grow" or "shrink" after a couple of years they can fix it, after 300,000 or 400,000 miles of wear send it in and they will replace the zippers and velcro and you will be good for another 400,000 miles, it is not a disposable suit, you will only need to buy once.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
I wear my Motoport every day.
Never found a better suit and it has never been too hot to wear my kevlar suit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
I wear my Motoport every day.
Never found a better suit and it has never been too hot to wear my kevlar suit.
:agree:

While riding through Phoenix a couple of weeks ago I saw 118F on the Wing temp gauge. I rode in cool comfort, thanks Motoport and LDComfort.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
:agree:

While riding through Phoenix a couple of weeks ago I saw 118F on the Wing temp gauge. I rode in cool comfort, thanks Motoport and LDComfort.
Trivia: The digital thermometer starts blinking at 121F. Won't register higher.

:nojoke:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
My Aerostich is 9+ years old, and wears just as new, even with hundreds of thousands of kilometres on it.
(I've recently sent it back for a "tune up," which consisted of a cleaning and replacement of a couple of pieces of velcro and a broken zipper pull.)
I'm comfortable to 99F. Hotter than that, I'm looking at a wet kerchief around the neck or ice in the pockets to ensure comfort, which it does provide.
If I lived in a hotter climate, the Darien Light, or other 2 piece alternative to my Roadcrafter would be my first choice.
That suit has taken me from Alaska, to Key West to Mexico, and is still my favorite piece of motorcycling equipment.
And yes, I've crash tested it. It held up very well, and protected me in the process. Not a pulled seam, not a protective pad that went awry, it worked as it should.
I can't recommend it strongly enough.:yes1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
The Brittany safety message video prompted me to post this question.

I am interested in a good quality riding suit like Aerostitch but reluctant to spend the money to buy one. I'm concerned a riding suit would be too hot or too uncomfortable for most riding and it would end up hanging on a hanger in the back of a closet.

One of the posters in the Brittany video mentioned that he always rides with a riding suit. I'm curious and would appreciate comments from those who have tried riding suits.

I live in Texas where the drought has brought almost unbearable hot days this summer so a riding suit would be impossible but I also take long trips to cooler climates and wonder if a riding suit would be a good idea.

I'm planning to leave October 1st to see the fall colors in VT and NH then ride all of New England. A riding suit might be comfortable on a trip like this.
My experience with the "Stich is that it was initially stiff, but, once broken in and washed, very comfortable. Not the least of that comfort came from seeing crashed suits on display at the factory, along with descriptions of the getoffs, and the condition of the rider afterwards. The factory had displayed suits that had been returned for repairs, but were deemed too damaged, so the incidents were pretty impressive.

An enormous virtue of the Stich is that you never have to stop to put on rain gear, you're always wearing it. Above 90F, you can either get a bag of ice and stuff ice in the many pockets or switch to hot weather gear. I started out doing the ice, and changed to the hot weather gear.

It's worth the money. There are reasons why a lot of Iron Butt guys wear it, and they're not going to ride far in discomfort. I like the one piece, easier to handle, no decisions needed about whether to wear the pants, and leg injuries are common in accidents. Buy it just a little large, they last long enough to suffer the usual issue of all your clothing shrinking over time (joke).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
I see the Motoport and Aerostich guys got in early. LOL

You speak of someone who hasn't tried the stuff. Lots of us live in hot parts of the US, and ride even when the mercury rises to triple digits. Lots of my friends think I am nuts for riding in textiles, or anything other than a t shirt, but I don't nearly fall over when we stop.

I won't push a brand, plenty will do that for me. I'll send you some info. http://www.ironbutt.com/ibmagazine/IronButt_1002_62-66_Hot.pdf

Read all about it and then buy good gear. That doesn't have to be a $800-$1100 jacket from Motoport, or even a $500 Stich, but good sturdy gear is a must for lots of reasons. LD comfort is good stuff. GoAtheletics has similar tops and reasonably priced, although they dry slightly faster, the price difference is more than worth it for me.

Happy hunting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
This is excellent stuff, except for the pictures and numbers at the end. His simple attempt at physics is not good.

The most obvious error caused by that simplification is seen in his pictures of people wearing short sleeved shirts, which ignore heat from the Sun. He mentions it in the text, than ignores it in his diagrams. He also mentions the importance of humidity in the text, but his over simplified calculations don't consider it at all. His statement that, above a specific temperature, wind chill doesn't work, is refuted by simply looking at any chart of wind chill. There's no temperature where things change dramatically. Evaporation is extremely powerful, and works better at high temperatures than he indicates, at the cost of needing to maintain hydration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
Saw the Brittany video, passed along by one of my GWRRA Chapter Z members. One thing she doesn't mention other than in passing is her injuries came about at 120 mph! At legal speeds, her injuries would have been a lot less serious. From the video near the end, she doesn't look like she has learned that lesson.

I believe in good protective gear, admit though, that I don't wear it all the time, especially in hot weather or very short trips. I know I should.

but good protective gear gets less effective at speeds like she was doing. Chances are she would still have damage at those speeds, and is lucky to be alive, no matter what she could have been wearing!

I have a tourmaster transition Series II jacket, and wear kevlar jeans from Diamond gusset along with leather chaps when cooler. Gloves and a good boots and a good helmet give me pretty good protection. Just need a mesh jacket for summer now, finding a 4XL is tough in anything other than black! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
another plug here for Motoport, where mine all year around.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I appreciate the responses. I'm amazed that fellow Texans and even someone who rides in AZ wears a riding suit year round. I would like to be able to do that. Sure would make packing for long trips easier!

What do you wear under a riding suit? Do you wear only underwear or LDComfort under a riding suit?

Is a riding suit warm enough at freezing temperatures without a riding jacket?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Riding gear

I wear Olympia AST jacket and Olympia ranger pants. Chippewa Rally boots and alpine star gloves and a quantum ARAI full face helmet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
I appreciate the responses. I'm amazed that fellow Texans and even someone who rides in AZ wears a riding suit year round. I would like to be able to do that. Sure would make packing for long trips easier!

What do you wear under a riding suit? Do you wear only underwear or LDComfort under a riding suit?

Is a riding suit warm enough at freezing temperatures without a riding jacket?
My year around riding gear consists of Motoport Ultra II Kelvar textile jacket and pants. Under the riding suit I wear only LDComfort long sleeve t-shirt and tights, no other clothing i.e. jeans, shirts, or tighty whiteys. When it is cold I will add electrics, when hot I will soak the LDC. Rain liners or gear is only needed if riding in very cold rain, other times I just enjoy the brief cooling of the outer gear from the rain. Of course motorcycle boots, gloves and full face helmet to go with the other gear.

To pack for a long trip, this last weekend as an example, I had the gear I was wearing plus a pair of socks, a set of LDC, a pair of shorts to put over the LDC tights if I had a need to remove the riding pants, a pair of jeans and a t-shirt for dinner, and a pair of flip flops. Add in a tooth brush and razor, a couple of chargers for the electronic gear and a iPad. Less than half a saddle bag and I could stay on the road for days.

I know it is counter intuitive but the hotter it gets the less ventilation you need, a riding suit is cooler than riding in jeans and a t-shirt.

I've ridden long miles in the low teens and above 115F in comfort with just that gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
This is excellent stuff, except for the pictures and numbers at the end. His simple attempt at physics is not good.

The most obvious error caused by that simplification is seen in his pictures of people wearing short sleeved shirts, which ignore heat from the Sun. He mentions it in the text, than ignores it in his diagrams. He also mentions the importance of humidity in the text, but his over simplified calculations don't consider it at all. His statement that, above a specific temperature, wind chill doesn't work, is refuted by simply looking at any chart of wind chill. There's no temperature where things change dramatically. Evaporation is extremely powerful, and works better at high temperatures than he indicates, at the cost of needing to maintain hydration.
I am glad we have a physics major that gets his message from pictures instead of text. I am yanking your chain, for good reason.
Read the article and take it or leave it, no sweat for anyone here. It comes from a lot of resaerch and riding miles in all sorts of temps. As for at the certain temp a wind chill doesn't work, well it is just that. I look at a lot of wind chill charts and have talked to the folks at NOAA that make them, It is done out of a chart and a formula. No more no less. How you react to it is a whole differnt story, they just try to get the median range in there.
At 95 ish degrees for me, some folks less, some folks more, hot wind actually stops cooling and starts heating.
It is info, look and find what you like. Several here, although we may wear diffferent gear, practice the principals and giggle to ourselves when we see unfortunate folks suffering in the heat especially when they just won't hear what you are trying to tell them. Bubba1 has been sending the message out for some time and it is a good one for anyone who will listen. I live in an area that the humidity is high. A 40% day is "dry" to us. It still works. Along the Louisiana coast or West Texas and beyond, it works.
Like I said, take it or don't. No sweat for me, but the man asked and he was given a link to one of the premier LD sites out there. These folks have no use for fads, just stuff that works and is no nonsence. The best riders in the world help bring this to you, so agree or not, they deserve a good long listen.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
The Brittany safety message video prompted me to post this question.

I am interested in a good quality riding suit like Aerostitch but reluctant to spend the money to buy one. I'm concerned a riding suit would be too hot or too uncomfortable for most riding and it would end up hanging on a hanger in the back of a closet.

One of the posters in the Brittany video mentioned that he always rides with a riding suit. I'm curious and would appreciate comments from those who have tried riding suits.

I live in Texas where the drought has brought almost unbearable hot days this summer so a riding suit would be impossible but I also take long trips to cooler climates and wonder if a riding suit would be a good idea.

I'm planning to leave October 1st to see the fall colors in VT and NH then ride all of New England. A riding suit might be comfortable on a trip like this.
Howdy from Aggieland!

I have spent more $,$$$ on riding suits than most and I believe this last spring I finally found the BEST suit for the extremes of Texas. I bought the Rev'it Defender GTX jacket + pants. I have ridden in weather from 45 to 120 and I have been comfortable (as comfortable as one is going to be) as long as:

1) I keep myself hydrated.
2) The bike is moving.

Best Regards,

Shane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
Howdy from Aggieland!

I have spent more $,$$$ on riding suits than most and I believe this last spring I finally found the BEST suit for the extremes of Texas. I bought the Rev'it Defender GTX jacket + pants. I have ridden in weather from 45 to 120 and I have been comfortable (as comfortable as one is going to be) as long as:

1) I keep myself hydrated.
2) The bike is moving.

Best Regards,

Shane

Looks like a nice jacket. I would question the use of 500D fabric and it seems a little costly but good looking. BTW see the link for info on tear and abrasion resistance of different fabrics. http://www.motoport.com/save-your-hide

While I agree drinking enough fluid is necessary, if you stay cool, normal intake works just fine. My cataract surgery several years ago gave me a build in hydrometer :). If my long range vision starts to blur I know I'm becoming dehydrated, a couple of slips from the bite valve and it is back to normal. Works great and is a good early warning of heat related issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,115 Posts
I've only tried one suit, the Aerostich Roadcrafter and it has worked great for me in all weather conditions. In the winter I either wear a fleece jacket under it or gerbing heated jacket. In the summer on long rides, the LDcomfort tights and long sleeve top. I did the whole BBG3000, 3000+ miles in 45 hours plus the other BBG last summer and saw a lot of 100 degree hours and a lot of 40s too. Outfit worked fine for me. Aerostich now has better zippers that don't leak so be sure and get the new zippers. Watch Aerostich for sale suits, sometimes they have photo shoots and stuff like that and sell some of the used suits for a couple hundred dollar discount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Looks like a nice jacket. I would question the use of 500D fabric and it seems a little costly but good looking. BTW see the link for info on tear and abrasion resistance of different fabrics. http://www.motoport.com/save-your-hide

While I agree drinking enough fluid is necessary, if you stay cool, normal intake works just fine. My cataract surgery several years ago gave me a build in hydrometer :). If my long range vision starts to blur I know I'm becoming dehydrated, a couple of slips from the bite valve and it is back to normal. Works great and is a good early warning of heat related issues.
Bubba,

The Rev'it Defender has several fabric strengths + high-end manufacturing technologies to keep the rider safe:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/r2/rev-it/defender-gtx-jacket-review/

As far as the Motorsport stuff, I have tried it on and will not doubt it's protection capabilities. But is is YEARS behind in comfort especially in the EXTREME heat!

Best regards,

Shane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,551 Posts
I have an Aerostich two piece suit and a Motoport GP2 (Kevlar) suit.

I am only responding here as I've had two low side crashes, at a race track, wearing my original Motoport GP2 suit. The first crash was at the top of turn two at Mosport. I tucked the front end at about 70-75mph, slid across the track and started tumbling when I hit the dirt and gravel. I kind of bounced on my rear left shoulder and right knee. On about my second bounce my brain had caught up with what was going on and I tucked my arms in. I can remember thinking "This is going to hurt tomorrow". Anyway the only damage to me was a sprained finger and a twisted ankle.

I didn't hurt next day, which I can only attribute to the foam padding/protection in the suit.

Second crash was a couple of years later, pushed a little too hard and again, tucked my front end this time in turn nine. I slid along way on my belly on the track, blew through two rows of hay bales and made a fairly soft impact with the tire wall.

This time I walked away totally unscathed.

As both of these crashes were left handers, the left arm was showing some signs of wear and I don't think it would have held up for a third low side on my left side, so I replaced the suit.

I still wear this suit when I go out for a street ride on one of my sports bikes.

I have seen two crashes where the riders were wearing Aerostich suits and both provided good abrasion protection in each instance.

A good friend of mine was wearing my Aeorstich suit when he had a very serious accident. He was life flighted to John Hopkins Baltimore shock trauma. They cut my Aerostich suit off him and the Police held onto it.

I called Aerostich to order a new suit and asked if they still had the size of the jacket and pants I had ordered originally. They were curious as to why I was ordering a new suit as my original was was less that two years old. I explained the accident and they gave me a huge discount on the new suit after I provided a digital picture of the first suit all cut up.

My friend recovered, after 1 month in shock trauma and 3 months in rehab, but has never ridden again.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top