GL1800Riders Forums banner

41 - 60 of 68 Posts

·
Love The DCT
Joined
·
11,545 Posts
The Minneapolis show has fewer and fewer factory displays every year, and no Euro factory teams this year. (There were a couple local dealers working the BMW display, but no factory guys). These days there are more “flea market” -type booths with people selling bandanas and doo-dads.

I once looked forward to seeing what new bikes are coming out and the cool displays (remember the Ducati girls?). The only reason I attend now is because it’s more of a social event for me, and we typically go out for burgers and beer afterwards. I spent four hours at the event, but only 15 min, at most, looking at bikes. The rest of the time I was visiting with riding buddies, fellow RiderCoaches, and cops working the event.
There hasn't been any Euro factory team presence at the Minneapolis show for the last two years.
:( ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I've been going for years and years. Just to get in the frame of riding season coming. Gives a little break after seeing your bike covered in the corner of the dark garage....

It's been getting thinner and thinner the last few years, but this year finally did it for me. I won't be going again. We mostly went because my buddy wanted to see the new 2020 wing colors, but they only had two there (one DCT tour and one DCT non tour) so he didn't even get to see that. None of the bigger European makes (welll Ural was there, but I have zero interest in a Ural and I wouldn't consider them to be bigger brand...) No BMW, No Ducati, No Aprilla, no KTM. Zero was there at least...

And the vendor area was so thin. We walked the entire show in an hour and 20 minutes, which included spending 20-30 of those looking at the two wings. Used to take me 3 hours ish do to the whole show. Large amounts of the vendor area taken up by a big swath of custom bikes on display, vintage bikes and the Zero test track.

Plus the prices on a couple of things I checked on were not deals at all. In the past I was able to get decent deals on gear and accessories...

I'm pretty much done making the trek to Chicago for this and paying overpriced parking and admission. Not sure if it was better in other cities, but... Chicago was a sad reflection of previous years...
A friend of mine went to the Cleveland show and said the same things. It's too bad the industry seems to be shrinking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I think the handwriting of a declining motorcycle industry is on the wall, the manufactures, dealers, vendors and show promoters all see it, but won't say it out loud!

I think this why you see Harley and Honda following the way of Viking and putting a bigger push on utility, sport, off-road and even water sports. For the first time in 30 years there will be no Laughlin River run; times just aren't what they used to be and you certainly can't blame the economy! As another poster observed, it's not just Motorcycles, also Classic cars ((actually I think Classic Car market is worse), anyone watch the January 2020 Barret-Jackson auction; I never saw so many 4-door later model daily driver type cars at Barret-Jackson cross the block. I think that the Millennials have far different interests than our generation did.

The good news is you can get a fairly decent deal on a new bike; but watch out when you go to sell it.
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
wow...way to turn this political.

instead of blaming the next generation or two, try to place the blame where it belongs...with the parents that raised these kids.

Parents gave these kids every new whizz bang electronic device. I can’t count all the $1000+ phones I see young people with. I’ve seen 5 year olds with iPhones.

People my age parked their kids in front of a tv to watch movies or play video games and wonder why they don’t want to go outside. How many parents never taught their kids to ride a bike because...well they might get hurt or killed.

The last 2 generations don’t see a reason to go drive around wasting gas like us and our parents before.

We were the ones who bought and brought the video games, computers and smartphones home for our kids. We exposed our kids to mass consumerism. Buy it now and throw it away tomorrow. And now we blame them because we’re all getting old and they don’t like the same hobbies we do?

we talked them into going to college and straddle themselves with a ton of debt when a lot of them should have learned a trade. A favorite slogan of my generation was “work smarter not harder” but to be honest, there are a lot of these kids that should have been made to learn to work hard.

We only have our selves to blame.


The generation of people who raised our hobby to its peak are dying off, and not be replaced. Its true in the classic car world, Harley world, and our Wing World. Our generation, and before, had an appreciation for this stuff that does not exist today in the young.....they are more interested in Bernie Sanders, free everything, and cell phones. Everything else to them is irrelevant. Glad I will be dead soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
wow...way to turn this political.

instead of blaming the next generation or two, try to place the blame where it belongs...with the parents that raised these kids.

Parents gave these kids every new whizz bang electronic device. I can’t count all the $1000+ phones I see young people with. I’ve seen 5 year olds with iPhones.

People my age parked their kids in front of a tv to watch movies or play video games and wonder why they don’t want to go outside. How many parents never taught their kids to ride a bike because...well they might get hurt or killed.

The last 2 generations don’t see a reason to go drive around wasting gas like us and our parents before.

We were the ones who bought and brought the video games, computers and smartphones home for our kids. We exposed our kids to mass consumerism. Buy it now and throw it away tomorrow. And now we blame them because we’re all getting old and they don’t like the same hobbies we do?

we talked them into going to college and straddle themselves with a ton of debt when a lot of them should have learned a trade. A favorite slogan of my generation was “work smarter not harder” but to be honest, there are a lot of these kids that should have been made to learn to work hard.

We only have our selves to blame.
Speak for yourself. I did not raise my kids this way. But, I will admit many parents did; however, blaming the parents alone is not at all realistic or fair. The marketing by the game manufacturers, as well as peer pressure, are strong. Ultimately I for one put the blame where it belongs.....with the kids. They have brains. They have thoughts. They can get up off their lazy *** themselves. Being aware of your actions is a personal responsibility, no matter how you got there.

But,.....this is straying. At best, you can realize that any hobby, motorcycling or classic cars is a passing phase. As for cars, I am encouraged by the younger generation of kids who "soup up" Hondas, Toyotas, etc......no matter how sad they are (compared to the muscle cars of the 60-70's). Motorcycling? I don't know what to think, but there is little doubt that the predominant large scale popularity of motorcycling was the 1980 - 2000 massive growth of the Harley Davidson motorcycle phenomenon....fueled by aging baby boomers and blue collar lifestyle. Here in western PA, it is still strong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
For years, the group think was that Harley was toast. Once those old baby boomers are done......

As it turns out it’s a problem across all brands.

Guess it doesn’t matter much whether you are selling 100 year technology or the most modern.

Motorcycling is dying. Electrics aren’t going to save it.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
  • Wow. Wow. Wow. When we went to the show my daughter that has a Ninja 500 and a 125 dirtbike was looking to upgrade to a new 2stroke Honda dirt bike. Her boyfriend has a 750 Gixxer and two dirtbikes. They have a bunch of friends that ride street and dirt. They bought his 10 year old nephew a Honda 75 dirtbike to ride. My wife's brother got his 12 year old a Yamaha dirt bike to ride. Not all is lost and bashing the next generation is really NOT NEEDED. I Have 3 very hard-working kids that have made good lives so far, and I can't believe I am the only parent here that does not agree.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,190 Posts
Easy here guys. We're not going to let this thread drift into 'how to parent'. So far it's pretty much been on topic, even though I did see a few rises in blood-pressures. A good 'ole discussion is fine, even encouraged. But let's don't get fired up over this, please! I'm sure ALL our kids are good, hard-working kids. Now, back to the comments specific to the OP's comments. Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I’m not sure how we took a hard turn to thinking that I’m blaming/bashing any generation!

All I said is Millennials have different interest than our/my generation! I think that is an undisputed fact that is obviously concerning manufactures, dealers, show promoters, venders, as demonstrated by all of these groups are scrambling to protect their share of the market by diversifying into areas that are presently in vogue such as: quads, off-road, dirt bikes, marine, etc.

As to the show attendance drop off; I think the manufactures bear much of the responsibility for that. In recent years we have seen more and more manufactures either scaling back or pulling out of shows completely. I can only speculate that their bean counters have calculated that they can reach the same or larger audience at fraction of the cost via internet advertising. I think that is a short sited view and under values the power of in person touch and kick the tires experience.

I’m curious if this trend extends across the entire spectrum of all trade shows and conventions? I hope this helps put this derailed thread back on track and I thank the OP for the post, I think that this is a trend that deserves watching!

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Whatever the reasons for the soft market for motorcycles, some of the blame for the lack of exhibitors at the motorcycle shows rests with the show's promotor. There is a death spiral going on: Lack of exhibits causes lack of interest, attendance declines, with low turnout more and more exhibitors--particularly smaller exhibitors--can't justify the cost of exhibiting and drop out and that causes further lack of attendance. It's difficult to counter large social forces, but there's a simple and direct way to increase the number of exhibitors and attendance: Lower the price of exhibition space and lower the price of admission. More exhibitors mean more revenue both from booth rental and attendance. IOW there is an agent in all this that could, if it weren't short-sighted, directly impact the vibrancy of the shows, but that agent is choosing not to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,807 Posts
Lots of folks love to complain but if the motorcycle show ever does disappear Most of the same folks will be saying how great it was and will be wanting it back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
So... lets blame the manufactures. No wait! let blame the shows, No wait, lets blame the people who don't ride yet. Let blame the parents of those who don't ride. No, let's blame techniology. No, we should blame the local dealer that went out of business. Lets face the truth. There is NO one person or part of the industry that is at fault here. NONE. We ALL need to get together and get this figured out or else its going to get worse before it gets any better. Do I have the answer, no I don't. At the end of the day, I'm going to do my part to support motorcycling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
So... lets blame the manufactures. No wait! let blame the shows, No wait, lets blame the people who don't ride yet. Let blame the parents of those who don't ride. No, let's blame techniology. No, we should blame the local dealer that went out of business. Lets face the truth. There is NO one person or part of the industry that is at fault here. NONE. We ALL need to get together and get this figured out or else its going to get worse before it gets any better. Do I have the answer, no I don't. At the end of the day, I'm going to do my part to support motorcycling.
I agree with everything you said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I went to the Chicago show about 10 years ago, was not impressed then...I can imagine how bad it is now. I don't know why motorcycling is losing popularity...when I was growing up, MCing was as hot as anything going...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
Vendors don't go to shows anymore because people don't go to shows anymore, by and large they get their stuff from the Internet (Wingstuff, Amazon). It's much easier these days to buy something used (Craigslist, eBay, Facebook Marketplace) and that takes a bite out of the new-product show sales as well. I'd like to attend a show for the experience, but I bet I wouldn't buy much so I'm a very poor customer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
The offroad scene is great, tons of youth at the races, that translates to road use later. Must be different with rural youth they seem to enjoy motors and the outdoors. Heck the fastest growing high school sport is trap shooting. Must be able urban dweller thing?

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
The offroad scene is great, tons of youth at the races, that translates to road use later. Must be different with rural youth they seem to enjoy motors and the outdoors. Heck the fastest growing high school sport is trap shooting. Must be able urban dweller thing?

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
Sadly, off-road is becoming more and more a Western thing, as the East becomes more and more populated and posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Less important, but also significant, was the nearly ubiquitous "outlaw" biker image. Honda for a while successfully countered this with preppy-looking college kids in their "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" campaign, but the current industry seems clueless about marketing.
I think this is MORE important than we admit. Motorcycles = those clowns on TV building choppers and yealling at each other. And when they see "bikers" in real life, the bikers are frowning, unfriendly, traveling in packs and look like criminals.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
I think this is MORE important than we admit. Motorcycles = those clowns on TV building choppers and yealling at each other. And when they see "bikers" in real life, the bikers are frowning, unfriendly, traveling in packs and look like criminals.
I agree with you. Plus there are the Harley-riding pharmacists and CPAs who compound the problem by wearing their pirate costumes while riding their bikes around. They frighten some of the civilians while others laugh and think, "I'm glad I don't look that ridiculous."
 
41 - 60 of 68 Posts
Top