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I'm not a Harley fan but I have no animosity toward the brand or their riders. I wish Harley well as it is good for the entire industry and the sport. But the world is changing, as it always has been, and from my viewpoint many of these changes (as it affects motorcycling) are not for the best. It wasn't that long ago that Rider Magazine sponsored a great annual rally, with every major manufacturer showing up with their demo fleet. I attended numerous Honda Hoots and loved them, other than the last one held which I think was in 2008 or 2009, which clearly was affected by the overall financial crisis in America and there were NO demo rides other than by Honda itself. Of my five grown children, one used to ride, and now the youngest is saying that when he can afford a bike he hopes to buy one, but no interest by the others. I have several grandchildren of legal age to drive and some do not even seem interested in getting a driver's license, and not a one of them has the least interest in a motorcycle. In fact, much to my surprise, when I offer to take a grandchild for a ride on my Goldwing it is the child that says that they are not interested, not the parent fearing for the child's safety. I've had grandchildren say that riding a motorcycle is just too scary for them. Very sad and it does not bode well for the future of the sport. But selfishly, I think that at least for the rest of my riding days there will be still be enough of a motorcycle industry that I will be able to find bikes and keep riding them. And despite my earlier comment on this thread, I likely will try the Chicago show again next year and give it at least that one more try.
 

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I'm not a Harley fan but I have no animosity toward the brand or their riders. I wish Harley well as it is good for the entire industry and the sport. But the world is changing, as it always has been, and from my viewpoint many of these changes (as it affects motorcycling) are not for the best. It wasn't that long ago that Rider Magazine sponsored a great annual rally, with every major manufacturer showing up with their demo fleet. I attended numerous Honda Hoots and loved them, other than the last one held which I think was in 2008 or 2009, which clearly was affected by the overall financial crisis in America and there were NO demo rides other than by Honda itself. Of my five grown children, one used to ride, and now the youngest is saying that when he can afford a bike he hopes to buy one, but no interest by the others.
I have several grandchildren of legal age to drive and some do not even seem interested in getting a driver's license
, and not a one of them has the least interest in a motorcycle. In fact, much to my surprise, when I offer to take a grandchild for a ride on my Goldwing it is the child that says that they are not interested, not the parent fearing for the child's safety. I've had grandchildren say that riding a motorcycle is just too scary for them. Very sad and it does not bode well for the future of the sport. But selfishly, I think that at least for the rest of my riding days there will be still be enough of a motorcycle industry that I will be able to find bikes and keep riding them. And despite my earlier comment on this thread, I likely will try the Chicago show again next year and give it at least that one more try.
I don’t get it; when I was a kid I had my 16th. birthday circled on the calendar for months and was counting the days until I could get my driver’s license; I was upset that my birthday fell on a legal holiday and the MVD was closed and I had to wait an extra day. It just wasn’t me; that was the mindset of all of my friends and classmates; it didn’t matter if you were a boy or girl, getting your driver’s license was biggest thing that ever happened to the kids of my generation.

Sadly your story of your grandkids not interested in even getting a driver’s license is not an isolated incidence; I have been meeting more and more people relating the same story and assume that it is a growing trend. I recently read a news article stating that the city of New York has the fewest licensed teenage drivers of ant major metropolitan area in the country. The article blamed Ubber for the phenomena, claiming that the teens feel that it much easier and less expensive to order a Ride Share that to buy, drive and park a car in New York City.

That may explain New York….but what’s the excuse for the rest of the nation?

Jim
 

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I don’t get it; when I was a kid I had my 16th. birthday circled on the calendar for months and was counting the days until I could get my driver’s license; I was upset that my birthday fell on a legal holiday and the MVD was closed and I had to wait an extra day. It just wasn’t me; that was the mindset of all of my friends and classmates; it didn’t matter if you were a boy or girl, getting your driver’s license was biggest thing that ever happened to the kids of my generation.

Sadly your story of your grandkids not interested in even getting a driver’s license is not an isolated incidence; I have been meeting more and more people relating the same story and assume that it is a growing trend. I recently read a news article stating that the city of New York has the fewest licensed teenage drivers of ant major metropolitan area in the country. The article blamed Ubber for the phenomena, claiming that the teens feel that it much easier and less expensive to order a Ride Share that to buy, drive and park a car in New York City.

That may explain New York….but what’s the excuse for the rest of the nation?

Jim
Yup. It's a conundrum. I'm in California, center of car culture, and my 16-year-old neighbor has zero interest in a driver's license. When asked why, she shrugs and says, "Uber and Lyft take me where I want to go when I want to go there."
 

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Yup. It's a conundrum. I'm in California, center of car culture, and my 16-year-old neighbor has zero interest in a driver's license. When asked why, she shrugs and says, "Uber and Lyft take me where I want to go when I want to go there."
 

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I didn't go the the Cleveland show this year because of the cost just to get in to the show -- $10.00 to park and $17.00 for show entrance fee -- $27.00 before you even see the first bike. It's like going to a car dealership and them charging you 27.00 to look at a car. If the motorcycle industrial wants you to buy bikes & vendors wants you to buy their products they should lower there prices or have some kind of deals or incentives to come to these show. Look at swap meets less than 10.00 to enter and you aren't paying top dollar for the parts you looking for. even though they are used or even new parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
This year I wouldn't have gone by myself, but my friend is in the market for a new wing and wanted to look at the 2020's (and see the color choices). There was one Honda dealer there representing Honda and only had two wings at the show. Again, I don't see myself attending again after many many years of regular attendance. We will just go out for breakfast or lunch instead.. :). Cheaper and we can still talk about bikes just as much...
 

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Vendors have found that the return on investment doesn't justify the cost of attending. And with the cost of convention centers continuing to rise, it makes the no show decision all that much easier.
 
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