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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A guy stops in today with a 2008 that he bought from his neighbor. One of his 2 switch assemblies, that sit on top his master cylinders, is not working. He also wanted his air filter replaced. I showed him how he has 4 loosely routed wires coming in to each fork in his fork tunnel area. I pointed out how dangerous that is, as well as other issues and shared that unless all of his wire routing issues is corrected, I have no interest in working on his wing. I shared with him that correcting it all, gets expensive and probably the fastest way to correct some of it, is to remove and reinstall his shelter and cowl is 3 hours of labor not include any wiring repair.

The other thing I offered was to install his air filter, and I could disable all his lighting. That then leaves him to reconnect it leaving him with the liability of making it all work again.

Here is the reality. I have other, easier to work on GoldWings that I'd much rather work on, instead of getting involved in someones rats nest that takes up hours of un-billable time. I mean ... how does someone even estimate labor time when working on Wings like this.

The dealer will not work on it either.

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Amazing! I'm surprised you didn't offer him some hotdogs and marshmallows since he's going to be the center of attraction at the barbecue. This person violated every one of my pet peeves when it comes to wiring. I get nauseated every time I see those hideous blue taps. That's the reason I won't buy used vehicles unless I get them at salvage pricing. You need to make a poster and put that up in your shop. You made the right decision as that bike will haunt you forever.
 

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Yupp, don't blame you Greg. Don't walk away from that job-RUN! Of course if the fellow has the $$$ by all means get his bike squared away so it will not go poof up in flames n smoke.
 

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You made the right decission here: I am a (retired now) HVAC heating and plumbing contractor............ EVERYTIME I came across a Rat's mess like this and I went ahead and fixed it, I was haunted with 2:00 AM(ish) morning telephone NO HEAT service calls.........After a few of these Junk calls I learned my lesson, it was totally cheaper for me to eat the fuel and time to visit their house, then to fix it, and well, all know the same story:: "you worked on it last/so this has to be a free service"......and I just wasted MY time and money, trying to help out a cheap customer.......

Ronnie
 

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The blue taps are one of the worst ideas yet in electrical wiring, also wire nuts have no place in automotive or motorcycle wiring, I have added some extra electrical items to my GL, but having worked as an industrial electrician and an aircraft electrician, I know my way around wires and have seen a lot of messes, but I have never seen a mess like that before. Best to walk away from that one.
 

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If it weren't for previous owners, I'll bet 80% of my vehicle repair projects never would have had to happen! That one takes the cake, though.
 
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Holy Crapoli, how much electrical add-ons did this guy have on the bike? Looks like when your neighbors are trying to steal your cable :)
 

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Soldering connections on motor vehicle wiring is not good practice. It creates hard spots subject to vibration fatigue. My own preference is to use Ancor brand heat shrink crimp fittings and the appropriate racheting crimp tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Soldering connections on motor vehicle wiring is not good practice. It creates hard spots subject to vibration fatigue. My own preference is to use Ancor brand heat shrink crimp fittings and an Ancor double crimp tool.
I'm not a big fan of solder on earth roaming vehicles either. However, I am a huge fan of double crimped connectors as seen everywhere on every connector on a GoldWing. Of coarse occasional failure occurs, such connectors have prove their reliability for about 100 years.

Single crimp connectors, such as all the ones hanging on a parts store wall that come in small packages, should only be for emergency or temporary repairs.
 

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Interesting. Double-crimp usually penetrates the sleeve and isn't waterproof, do you heat-shrink over the connector to provide some semblance of waterproofing, or doesn't it matter?
 

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Soldering connections on motor vehicle wiring is not good practice. It creates hard spots subject to vibration fatigue. My own preference is to use Ancor brand heat shrink crimp fittings and an Ancor double crimp tool.
I know this thread might turn into a crimp vs. solder debate, but I'm from the solder camp and have been doing it for decades without a single failure. Of course, using proper soldering techniques and waterproofing is the key to the ultimate connection. And no, vibrations won't ever cause a failure if you properly secure your cabling. You'll never see and taps or crimp barrel connectors in my toolbox no matter how good the claims seem to be. Garbage in garbage out!!
 

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When I replaced my Battery yesterday I removed a few miscellaneous wires that went to know where from the previous owner. Messing wiring drives me nuts.
 
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Interesting. Double-crimp usually penetrates the sleeve and isn't waterproof, do you heat-shrink over the connector to provide some semblance of waterproofing, or doesn't it matter?
On 5th gens most connections have no heat shrink. For moisture protection, Honda uses connection location, connector tucked into boots, and sometime waterproof connectors.
 

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I know this thread might turn into a crimp vs. solder debate, but I'm from the solder camp and have been doing it for decades without a single failure. Of course, using proper soldering techniques and waterproofing is the key to the ultimate connection. And no, vibrations won't ever cause a failure if you properly secure your cabling. You'll never see and taps or crimp barrel connectors in my toolbox no matter how good the claims seem to be. Garbage in garbage out!!
From industry to industry there are different termination standards, and I was trying to remember the standard used when I worked at Boeing building 747s'. If I recall it is probably similar to the standards used in the link below ... defense fighter jets. I wonder what the standards are for space travel.

 

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Interesting. Double-crimp usually penetrates the sleeve and isn't waterproof, do you heat-shrink over the connector to provide some semblance of waterproofing, or doesn't it matter?
Crimping with the proper tool and fittings does not penetrate the sleeve. I think I paid over $50 for my VPA GS crimp tool over 20 years ago. Ancor heat shrink fittings are crimped properly with the appropriate crimping tool then a little heat seals the heat shrink.
 

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From industry to industry there are different termination standards, and I was trying to remember the standard used when I worked at Boeing building 747s'. If I recall it is probably similar to the standards used in the link below ... defense fighter jets. I wonder what the standards are for space travel.

Thanks for posting that link to a very informative article. As you probably seen at Boeing was pre-manufactured wiring harnesses or a shop/division on site that made them. All of the terminations were made with a crimping tool that is pin type/manufacturer specific that went into the connector for that application. Of course, these crimpers are expensive and have interchangeable dies for each pin type. This puts them out of reach of most independent shops and hobbyists. Of course we can find some deals on eBay. A perfect crimp on generic pins and lugs with a universal crimper can be very elusive and more problematic. I still go old school and solder where I can.
 

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I know this thread might turn into a crimp vs. solder debate, but I'm from the solder camp and have been doing it for decades without a single failure. Of course, using proper soldering techniques and waterproofing is the key to the ultimate connection. And no, vibrations won't ever cause a failure if you properly secure your cabling. You'll never see and taps or crimp barrel connectors in my toolbox no matter how good the claims seem to be. Garbage in garbage out!!
The problem is that many people don't solder well and they don't secure the wiring. There are ham fisted amateurs in both camps. My first paycheck job was in a Texas Instrument calculator plant. I made the charger receptacles for the first TI30 calculators and after training soldered 500 receptacles a shift, two wires to a component or a 1000 solder connections a day. I can solder well enough to get by.
 
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