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Stock, the 2001-2017s have a little more lean angle compared to 2018s before the peg feelers touch pavement. Like others have posted the GW is designed with adequate ground clearance for it's intended purpose but if you ride with a little more sport in your tour there is some things we can do to cope with limited lean angle. #One is to shift one's upper body to the side into the direction of the turn when tipping the bike into a corner. You don't have to hang off like a racer or sport bike rider, just the upper body above the hips. This reduces lean angle a few degrees for the same radius of turn thus giving extra degrees of lean angle or keeping those few extra degrees of lean angle in reserve. #One is free and and involves riding technique only. #Two we can also increase ground clearance by reducing front suspension sag on 01-17s by adding preload spacers for solo or light weight couples. The stock suspension had 60% sag under my 165 lbs when it should have 30 to 40%. IIRC I gained 11 mm of ride height by adding spacers on top of the stock springs to reduce sag to 45%. The rear shock needed the same 11 mm of preload to keep the bike level and retain stock steering geometry. Servicing the rear shock preload reservoir gives maximum preload adjuster travel to cope with added fork preload. Combined with riding technique there is actually quite a bit of extra ground clearance found with #One and Two. Further upgrades by Progressive and Traxxion are needed for heavier riders to reduce sag. The stock springs are overwhelmed with heavier solo riders and most all couples two-up.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
yes I know the value of a good suspension, before I put a mile on my rocket 3 roadster, I installed traxxion in the front and hagon nitros in the rear. we always ride 2 up so I didn't want to wallow in the turns and have surprise episodes going over rough roads. while the rr3 is a blast, it's not an automatic. I think the wing will be overall a more balenced ride for us. I'll do whatever it takes to get the best handling bike it can be.
 

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I can personally attest to that! I am about 255#, riding alone on Tour model with (for time being) stock suspension. I scrape either peg on occasion, but on sharp curves at spirited speeds the OE suspension compresses to the bottom. In that state, the Mick-O-Peg mounting block cap makes contact almost immediately after the peg touches down. In my hair raising experience, that not only lifts the front, but lifts the front and rear almost equally and the bikes "floats" toward the outside of the curve. Im my case, I still have enough tracton to push up onto the tires and avoid the hill side and thank Heaven there was no oncomming traffic. The MOP cap bears a scar to remind me. The previous model was similar or even worse as its OE springs sacked-out early in life. Progressives front and rear helped; Traxxion even better. I will Traxxion again (either with Fred or Max).

prs
 

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I can personally attest to that! I am about 255#, riding alone on Tour model with (for time being) stock suspension. I scrape either peg on occasion, but on sharp curves at spirited speeds the OE suspension compresses to the bottom. In that state, the Mick-O-Peg mounting block cap makes contact almost immediately after the peg touches down. In my hair raising experience, that not only lifts the front, but lifts the front and rear almost equally and the bikes "floats" toward the outside of the curve. Im my case, I still have enough tracton to push up onto the tires and avoid the hill side and thank Heaven there was no oncomming traffic. The MOP cap bears a scar to remind me. The previous model was similar or even worse as its OE springs sacked-out early in life. Progressives front and rear helped; Traxxion even better. I will Traxxion again (either with Fred or Max).

prs
I'm very glad you kept things under control and rode through your touch down.

Does the MOP mounting block reduce the lean angle significantly or does the Tour just have less cushion between the pegs touching down and other hard parts scraping? I know on my Goldwing the pegs will fold quite a bit before anything else touches. I also know I would get into lots of trouble with stock suspension on a 1832.
 

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Obviously there is a big difference in what we both consider "routine" turns and curves. I now have the full Traxxion suspension upgrade on my 2018. But before I had the upgrade performed, I travelled cross-country, including riding the mountains of the continental divide, and NEVER scraped anything on routine turns and curves. I guess you could scrape your foot pegs and crash bars on the Tail of the Dragon, but those turns far exceed normal turns and curves.
 

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Does the MOP mounting block reduce the lean angle significantly or does the Tour just have less cushion between the pegs touching down and other hard parts scraping? I know on my Goldwing the pegs will fold quite a bit before anything else touches.
"Does the MOP mounting block reduce the lean angle significantly" The MOP mounting blocks are attached to the forward engine guards like most aftermarket highway pegs. Point being, other highway pegs may limit lean angle some as well.

With the bike on the center stand, you have the option of rotating the MOP mounting block before clamping it down to the engine guard. The block can be mounted so that the outer face of the block is perpendicular to the floor or rotated upwards to a maximum angle of 35 degrees relative to the floor. As the block is rotated upwards your available lean angle is increased.

In my case I find the pegs provide the best positioning and comfort with the blocks rotated full up at 35 degrees which just happens to provide the greatest ground clearance. This mounting position IMO does not significantly limit lean angle. I wear a size 13 boot so the touch down sequence in a sharp turn would be: Boot begins to drag, Rider Peg begins to drag, MOP Mounting Block begins to drag.

If you want to have the bikes maximum design lean angle available to you, then you probably don't want to mount anything to the front engine guards.
 

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I'm very glad you kept things under control and rode through your touch down.

Does the MOP mounting block reduce the lean angle significantly or does the Tour just have less cushion between the pegs touching down and other hard parts scraping? I know on my Goldwing the pegs will fold quite a bit before anything else touches. I also know I would get into lots of trouble with stock suspension on a 1832.
Comparing the previous model of Goldwing to the present, each in stock form; I do not think there is a significant difference in hard part clearance with suspension compressed at speed in hard turns. The previous edition could be greatly improven in that degree of compression with some rather inexpensive suspension modifications and improved a bit more with some rather lavish modicications. I plan on some rather lavish modifications to my 2018. If I were to venture a good guess, I think the stock set-up on the new model rides with a little more clearance than does the previous, given fresh stock suspension; but its close. Both ride precariously close to full compression with stock suspension.

prs
 

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Comparing the previous model of Goldwing to the present, each in stock form; I do not think there is a significant difference in hard part clearance with suspension compressed at speed in hard turns.
I would agree. I don't notice much difference in ground clearance between my 2013 F6B and my now 2018 DCT.

I can definitely say the 2018 is all around more agile and stable. The steering of the F6B in wide sweeping turns at higher speeds was a bit sensitive. Over steer just a tad and you could loose your line through a turn. With the 2018 you lay it over into the turn and it just seems to lock itself into that line.
 

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Obviously there is a big difference in what we both consider "routine" turns and curves. I now have the full Traxxion suspension upgrade on my 2018. But before I had the upgrade performed, I travelled cross-country, including riding the mountains of the continental divide, and NEVER scraped anything on routine turns and curves. I guess you could scrape your foot pegs and crash bars on the Tail of the Dragon, but those turns far exceed normal turns and curves.
Much of our West Virginia roads are just naturally comparable to a barrel of fish hooks or a can of worms. So my normal may be pretty much a nightmare to what some rides are acustimed to riding.

prs
 

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Much of our West Virginia roads are just naturally comparable to a barrel of fish hooks or a can of worms. So my normal may be pretty much a nightmare to what some rides are acustimed to riding.

prs
I've ridden Old Route 60 (Midland Trail) from Charleston, WV East to Route 220 North up to Altoona, PA a couple times. It's miles and miles of twisties and by the time you approach Altoona you are grateful to God to see a straight patch of pavement that is at least 100 yards long. It's a long day but I recommend the ride.
 

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I think part of the problem is quite a few blokes sit like a statue while riding, or worse push down on the bars and lean away from the inside of the curve keeping their body more or less vertical.

There are many posted photos on this site like in the Dragon that demonstrate this....

If you move your head to the inside of the curve your shoulders will follow. Thus you decrease the required lean angle for that curve.

Im not suggesting you totally get a knee down but simply by moving your head and upper body to the inside makes a hell of a difference.

You will never get these lard backside bikes to corner like, say a 675 Daytona , but a small and easily achieved change in riding posture and position while cornering .........

Give it a go.
 

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Much of our West Virginia roads are just naturally comparable to a barrel of fish hooks or a can of worms. So my normal may be pretty much a nightmare to what some rides are acustimed to riding.

prs
You have some fine roads in West Virginia PRS
 

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I've ridden Old Route 60 from Charleston, WV East to Route 220 North up to Altoona, PA a couple times. It's miles and miles of twisties and by the time you approach Altoona you are grateful to God to see a straight patch of pavement that is at least 100 yards long. It's a long day but I recommend the ride.
That part of 60 (Midland Trail) where Kanawha meets Fayette is very popular and very twisty, but nice wide pavement, well kept, and banked curves. 219,220, and 221 are all good MC ride along the Appalachians.

prs
 

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strongly considering a new touring gold wing. One of the things that I notice is that there is usually scraping taking routine turns and curves. Do you have issues with the scraping? Is it alarming to do so or is it rather light and the foot pegs move up slightly. Am I correct in that it is the pegs? Has anybody considered going up in tire height?
Thanks in advance!!

Bob
2019 DCT Tour stock suspension set to rider + baggage. I’ve ridden aggressively at times and only scraped my highway pegs which I think I have mounted too low anyway. Doesn’t concern me much. Never scraped any stock parts.
I’d scrape the rider pegs often on my ‘04 but the pegs would spring up and absorb it.
 

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The pegs fold up a bit before you start to grind the head guards (and you have a little plastic there before you hit hard parts. I just use the pegs as my indicator that I'm going fast enough and to not push it anymore. Last summer I was scraping pegs pretty regularly even at 160 lbs and not loaded. I'm guessing if you are heavier and loaded you'd be riding a bit lower. Either way, the pegs are your indicator.

If you want to push more than that, you should look into a sport touring bike like the Yamaha FJ, you could get a bit more spirited on that. I decided to go with the Goldwing because I didn't want the desire to go fast on the street. I have a ZX10R for the track where I get my adrenalin fix, the 'wing is my magic carpet ride.
 

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dragging pegs is perfectly fine. Myself and others do it all the time. It can be a little alarming at first but you soon get past that. I drag so much at the track that I've started lifting my foot off the peg while it drags around the corner. It was starting to grind a hole in the side of my new boots. Sounds way different having the peg skim along the asphalt with any weight on it. My advice would be, proceed with baby steps and have fun.
 
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