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Discussion Starter #1
I converted my dim lights to HIDs with DDM Tuning's kit. Tried to install a Signal Dynamics modulator on the brights, but received an incorrect wiring harness two times & got a refund. Besides, the yellow brights and white HIDs on the dim side looked kind of goofy together. So I decide to convert the brights to HID also.

I ordered another DDM kit and, as anybody who has dealt with DDM knows, they don't stock parts in San Diego, lights are shipped directly from China. I installed them and one bulb is definitely much dimmer than the other three bulbs. DDM says the only way they will warranty it is if I "take a picture of the light beam" and send it to them showing the inferior beam. I tried that & it occured to me that there is no way to isolate the bright beam without the low beam being on next to it, & therefore no way to comply with their procedure.

In the meantime, not wanting to wait forever to get this problem resolved with DDM and wanting to have backup parts on hand anyway, I order a set of two bulbs from Forte Motors, the company in Los Angeles that sells their kit on EBay that several people on this site have ordered from. I placed the order at noon on Tuesday and by 10am Thursday, I have the kit in my hands. Terrific service.

I unpack the kit and, per their instructions, hook up the ballast, starter & bulb and test it before I actually install the bulb into the housing. I tested it by touching the two leads directly to my battery terminals and it lights up like a country churchhouse. All is well at this point.

So I install the bulb into the bright housing, hook up all the other wires again, insert the two leads into the bike's headlight connector, make sure the bright switch on the handlebars is in the correct position, turn the key to the ON position, and NOTHING. My other 3 HIDs are illuminated, but this new one flickers one time when the switch is first turned on, then stays off.

I end up trying the 2nd new bulb from Forte and got the same result...one flicker when the key is first turned on, then no light at all from the bulb. I tested the bike's headlight feed and got 12 volts, no problem there. It's like my bike won't "recognize" this HID system when installed through the bikes wiring harness, but the HID lights up with no problem when hooked up directly to the battery. Does anybody have ANY idea what could be going on here? Otherwise, I'm stuck until I can get some resolution from DDM and get another one of their bulbs from China.

PLEASE HELP
DOUG
 

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low voltage

Doug, you've got a low voltage problem. Yes, when you tested the voltage to the plug you got ~12 volts. But that was with no load applied. You've got a higher resistance contact/relay/plug in the circuit, so when it is drawing the higher amperage necessary to fire the circuit the voltage drops too low to be able to be used for the HID.

This is just a quick response to get you started. I've got to leave for that terrible 4-letter word to earn gas money. :evil:

But someone more familiar with the circuit will come on and give more info. Also, use the search function and look at some of the previous threads concerning high-beam wiring. The high beams are powered via two separate paths, one being through the handlebar switch and the other through a relay under the seat as I recall. Seems like handlebar is the left one, relay is the right one. Definitely don't hold me to that, I don't have time to get my service manual out.

However, try swapping your high beam relay out with one of the other ones in the relay panel. Also, hook a voltmeter up to the primary side of the HID ballast and monitor voltage when you try to light up the lights. MAKE SURE you hook up to the 12 volt side, or your meter will be toast as the secondary side is several thousand volts to fire the bulb.

I have the HIDs on low beams and use a Kisan modulator on high beams, works well for me. There are times it takes a few firing cycles for one of my low beams to kick on due to a voltage drop I haven't tracked down yet.

So here's some info to get you started, good luck to ya.

Edit: If you haven't done this already, try firing the lights with the engine running. The ~14 volts from the alternator really helps get the things working versus the ~12 volt battery by itself.
 

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I recently installed 2 sets of HIDs from DDM Tuning. One in the low beams, the other in the fogs.

The foglights could be a little hesitant to fire up when just turned on, especially if the bike was not running. They fire right up when the bike has been running for a few seconds.

Apparently they are somewhat voltage sensitive. I think another factor is that their light-off current is quite a bit higher than their running current. The very light gauge Honda wiring has a bit of trouble providing the initial higher current.

I plan on doing the high beams later this summer. Plan on using the DDM 5000K's again, so they all color match.
 

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The voltage for the left and right high beams comes from different sources. It will cause no end of trouble, the easy fix is to build a HID harness wired directly to the battery. Use one of the high beam sockets to trip the HID relay on and off. Don't try to run the HID ballast via the high beam sockets. If you don't want to build your own harness, order one here...

http://www.retrosolutionsllc.com/servlet/the-247/HID-XENON-WIRING-HARNESS/Detail




 

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Discussion Starter #5
I followed SSNCOB's advice and started the bike and after a few minutes, the errant bulb lit up. I thought my battery was fully charged, but maybe not; I put the slow charger on it and will try again later. At least I know the bulb is not bad.

Larry, what you're recommending sounds good, but is over my head. I'm not much of an electrician. Using one of the harnesses you're talking about, would I still be able to use the dimmer switch on the left handlebar?

Thanks to both of you guys for helping
Doug
 

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Larry can provide the specifics, he has more experience in this area. But yes, you still use the high/low beam rocker switch on the handlebar.
 

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Larry can provide the specifics, he has more experience in this area. But yes, you still use the high/low beam rocker switch on the handlebar.
Correct.. all the HID harness does is provide power direct from the battery, this eliminates the low voltage issue inherent with the OEM wiring. High beam switch works exactly as before, except it turns the HID harness relay on which fires off the ballast. Connecting the harness is pretty straight forward. Ballast connections, battery connections and then a connection to the H7 high beam socket.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, I've ordered the harness from Retro Solutions to run the high beam HIDs directly from the battery via a relay. Forgot to get an estimated delivery date, will do that Monday.

One more question: When installing this harness for the high beams, it is supposed to go to the battery. Would I lose any current if I hooked it up to an unswitched terminal in an auxiliary fuse block instead of directly to the battery posts?

Doug
 

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Pulled out the TM and looked at the high beam wiring circuit. It is split. The left high beam has its feed wire goes into the dipper switch, out of the switch is split off into 4 paths, one to the left high beam, one to combination meter (for the high beam indicator light), one for the fog light relay (if fitted) and the other into the trigger circuit for high beam relay.

The right high beam is triggered by the switched circuit of the high beam relay.

I guess Honda did it this way so that if the high beam relay were to fail, you would still have at least one high beam (the left). If the switch goes, you're SOL.
 

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One more question: When installing this harness for the high beams, it is supposed to go to the battery. Would I lose any current if I hooked it up to an unswitched terminal in an auxiliary fuse block instead of directly to the battery posts?Doug
As long as the auxiliary fuse block is one of those add-on terminal blocks that is fed from the battery, no - you will not lose anything (as long as the aux fuse block has a decent size wire gauge feeding it).

If you are talking about the auxiliary connection located on the main fuse block, no - it will not work. That is a 5 amp fused circuit meant for small current items like a gps, cell phone, etc.

There is a thread floating on this board that has a schematic of a light relay activated by the oil pressure switch (like the headlight aiming control is). That way the lights don't try to come on unless the engine is running. I personally don't have it installed, but it is an option for you while you are installing the new harness.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I received the new harness this morning. At first it looked like pile of snakes, but I eventually figured out where everything goes. The grounds (there are two of them) don't go to the battery, but instead have to go somewhere close to the ballasts. So I've go to find a bolt somewhere hopefully without drilling. And the next challenge is how to run the harness without removing the shelter. Initial observation indicates it can't be done.

I jury rigged the harness and the bright HIDs illuminated instantly so at least I know that it solves the low voltage problem.

And yes, I was talking about an auxiliary fuse box with a 10 gauge wire feeding it.

Thanks again to you guys for steering me in the right direction. I would have never figured this out by myself.

Doug
 
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