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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For decades I have changed many tires, including car (old Studebakers), motorcycle, bicycle, riding lawn mower, etc. Back in the day, I even used to change BMW MC tires on their old, "safety rim", which many riders could not do. About 15 years ago, I bought a HF tire changer, with MT accessory, and it made car & motorcycle tire changing a cake walk. But even before the HF changer, I never met a tire I could not change; in a pinch, I could get by in the driveway, with only basic tools (couple of large screwdrivers or pry-bars, and rubber mallet).

The above was true, till 15 months ago, trying to mount a CT (Dunlop WS) on my GL1800. I used every tool and trick available, but even with my 16 y/o son's help, gave up after 2-3 hours. I have since been taking CTs to my brother's shop. But it is a 150 mile round trip, and he is not the tire changer, just the, "key" to the service. For numerous reasons, I wanna be able to change my own CTs on the GL1800, so am now gearing up for a 2nd attempt. For practice, I now have a worn out Bridgestone DG, still on the rim. If I can get it off and back on the rim, I will have confidence to order a new tire and do it myself. If not, then I won't.

In light of the above, I am asking for ANY input from ANYONE with first hand experience changing CTs on GoldWing wheels. For example, which side of the rim is easiest to work from, to get the tire off/on the rim? Again, any and all tips appreciated.

Thanks Much
 

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I change all of my tires by hand and with hands tools. The Wing MC rear tire was the hardest tire I have ever had to change because of the stiff side wall. I have never mounted a RF CT but I don't think it would be too hard except for the foam stuff on the inside. I did mount a CT on my Wing and it was easy. I digress, It does not matter which side of the rim except for the brake rotor being in the way or being damaged while working on the rim and tire. I use rim protectors (plastic clip ons) 4 of them so not to damage or scratch rim. I use 3 tire irons ( spoon type). It is important to have a long wavey tire iron because it can reach around the tire to the rim when spooning the tire initially on the rim or off the rim. Obviously, soapy water in a spray bottle is key for lubing the bead. I am not sure exactly which part of the install you are not doing correctly. The key to spooning the tire on the rim is keeping the bead pushed into the rim recess opposite the spoon on the tire. I use the spoons to break the bead by inserting the spoon between the bead and the rim and pushing down. I use 2 or 3 spoons in combination to do this. I never had a tire I could not install. Dirt bike tubed tires are my specialty.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
UPDATE: Never mind, the deed is done!!! After the OP, I went into the garage, gathered everything up, and began. It was a perfect day, mid 60s and lots of sunshine, so I worked in the sunny driveway. I removed the old Bridgestone DG by myself. I put the first bead back on by myself, without even a single tool. But on the second bead I got stuck at the same point as last time. However, with my son simply holding one of the pry bars in place, I got the second bead back on in less than 10 minutes.

The most important tip is to slather the, "NO-MAR Tyre Mount Lubricant" onto all gliding surfaces: both lips and inside valley of the wheel, inside and outside both tire beads. After that, it is not much different from other tires. However, if not for the N-M lube, I doubt I'd have even gotten the old tire off.

Installing the second bead, I used 3 sockets to substitute for wooden and plastic blocks I've saw on youtube. They worked OK, but I now see why the ones for sale are tethered by a nylon rope; a couple of times a socket came out like a projectile, and I am just glad my son nor I were hit. So whatever I use next time will be tethered.

I realize the sun helped a lot today in keeping the CT more pliable, and a new CT will be even stiffer than the worn out DG of today. But with 3/4 of the jar of N-M lube remaining, I think I got this! Planning to order a new DG online today. :)
 

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Joe, I have mounted several car tires. I use the HF changer and a Mojo bar with two or three 1X2 wooden blocks. Let the tire sit in the sun for an hour or so, turning half way through. A hot tire is much easier to mount. Lube the bead with any tire mounting paste. Push the first bead on the wheel. Start the second bead with the Mojo bar. Run the bar half way around the tire. Now using a tire spoon, slide the wooden blocks between the tire and the wheel to keep the bead below the rim in the valley on the opposite side from the bar. Then run the bar around the wheel. The bead must be in the valley for the opposite side to clear the rim. The only tire I couldn’t mount successfully was the Yokohama.

Joe mounted the tire before I could finish typing! Congratulations!
 

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UPDATE: Never mind, the deed is done!!! After the OP, I went into the garage, gathered everything up, and began. It was a perfect day, mid 60s and lots of sunshine, so I worked in the sunny driveway. I removed the old Bridgestone DG by myself. I put the first bead back on by myself, without even a single tool. But on the second bead I got stuck at the same point as last time. However, with my son simply holding one of the pry bars in place, I got the second bead back on in less than 10 minutes.

The most important tip is to slather the, "NO-MAR Tyre Mount Lubricant" onto all gliding surfaces: both lips and inside valley of the wheel, inside and outside both tire beads. After that, it is not much different from other tires. However, if not for the N-M lube, I doubt I'd have even gotten the old tire off.

Installing the second bead, I used 3 sockets to substitute for wooden and plastic blocks I've saw on youtube. They worked OK, but I now see why the ones for sale are tethered by a nylon rope; a couple of times a socket came out like a projectile, and I am just glad my son nor I were hit. So whatever I use next time will be tethered.

I realize the sun helped a lot today in keeping the CT more pliable, and a new CT will be even stiffer than the worn out DG of today. But with 3/4 of the jar of N-M lube remaining, I think I got this! Planning to order a new DG online today. :)
SOUNDS LIKE YA JUST NEEDED "3 " HANDS ! :serious::wink2:
 

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I change a lot of tires. I bought a BeadBuster. It has never failed to break the bead seal before dismounting a tire off the rim. Other must have tools are the Mojo bar, the NoMar tire paste, RuGlyde and the curved Motion-Pro tire irons the Prophet provided a link to. The NoMar tires irons also have occasionally saved the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I change a lot of tires. I bought a BeadBuster. It has never failed to break the bead seal before dismounting a tire off the rim. Other must have tools are the Mojo bar, the NoMar tire paste, RuGlyde and the curved Motion-Pro tire irons the Prophet provided a link to. The NoMar tires irons also have occasionally saved the day.
The HF machine I have has a bead buster, and it took about 30 seconds per side. I have tried the RuGlyde, but the NO-MAR lube is 10 times more slippery, and remains in place till the job is done. I understand the NO-MAR tire irons will not scar the metal wheels, which is a major plus. But the tire went on so easily today, my pry bars did not damage the wheels. At least none that I seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I ordered a Bridgestone DG online, which should be here this week. Will wait for the first sunny day, when my son is available to help mount it. Sure is good to not have to rely on others to do routine maintenance, nor have to drive 150 round trip to get a tire mounted.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And just like that, the new DG is now on the wheel, aired up and ready to go. It came today around 2PM, and by 3:30 it was mounted. Coulda done it sooner but had to wait for the wife to get home from work, needed a third hand. I did not use anymore N-M lube today, as there was still plenty on the rim from two days ago.

It looks like the N-M lube will take a long time to dry, if ever. It was just as slick today on the old tire, as it was when I applied it. So, after mounting the new tire but before adding air, I spent an extra 20-30 minutes wiping as much of that stuff off as I could. I used a pry bar to pry the tire away from the bead, and worked my way around each side 2-3 times, wiping the wheel and tire bead with a shop towel. Still, it only took 35 PSI to pop the tire onto the bead. Would have preferred the beads to be clean and dry, but then it would not have been possible to mount the new tire.

So now the deed is done, and I believe I can mount my own Run Flat CTs from now on. I make no claim to not scaring the wheel though. Not bad, but a gouge here and there. I know the NO-MAR tools woulda avoided scaring, maybe by next time I will have those on hand.
 

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For sure use the mojo lever and nomar lube. Don't use spoon bars. Mojo lever makes the job basically same as working with a motorcycle tire. Wood blocks as mentioned come in handy too. The nomar yellow thing tool is also good to have.
 

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This guy shows how easy it is.
/www.youtube.com/watch?v=PazLMQLtpMI
 

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For decades I have changed many tires, including car (old Studebakers), motorcycle, bicycle, riding lawn mower, etc. Back in the day, I even used to change BMW MC tires on their old, "safety rim", which many riders could not do. About 15 years ago, I bought a HF tire changer, with MT accessory, and it made car & motorcycle tire changing a cake walk. But even before the HF changer, I never met a tire I could not change; in a pinch, I could get by in the driveway, with only basic tools (couple of large screwdrivers or pry-bars, and rubber mallet).

The above was true, till 15 months ago, trying to mount a CT (Dunlop WS) on my GL1800. I used every tool and trick available, but even with my 16 y/o son's help, gave up after 2-3 hours. I have since been taking CTs to my brother's shop. But it is a 150 mile round trip, and he is not the tire changer, just the, "key" to the service. For numerous reasons, I wanna be able to change my own CTs on the GL1800, so am now gearing up for a 2nd attempt. For practice, I now have a worn out Bridgestone DG, still on the rim. If I can get it off and back on the rim, I will have confidence to order a new tire and do it myself. If not, then I won't.

In light of the above, I am asking for ANY input from ANYONE with first hand experience changing CTs on GoldWing wheels. For example, which side of the rim is easiest to work from, to get the tire off/on the rim? Again, any and all tips appreciated.

Thanks Much
Check with Len from Helotes
 
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