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This morning I was attempting to remove the set screw that is in the rear shock. The one you must remove before removing the clip that holds the spring in place. After a lot of force the allen wrench slipped. I now have it soaking with WD40. Any advice would be welcome.
Thanks in advance
Boomer
 

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In the past, if I had an allen head screw strip out, I was able to use a torx bit to bite and remove it. I would then replace it asap, obviously.
 

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In the past, if I had an allen head screw strip out, I was able to use a torx bit to bite and remove it. I would then replace it asap, obviously.
I'll try this later today or tomorrow. I have doctors appointment now. Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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Boomer, try some heat on it after soaking overnight. You should be able to use a soldering tool if it has soft goods that might be damaged using a propane torch. The aluminum should expand much faster than the set screw if you can use the torch. The torq bit is the way to go just hammer it in good.


Billy
 

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Any time I have trouble removing a fastener, I apply heat to it. Depends on the size and placement of the fastener as to how much heat and how it is delivered.


For small fasteners in locations where using a flame is a problem, I have used a soldering iron or a soldering gun. That technique worked well on delicate parts, like electronic parts. When I was a radio technician in the Air Force, I used that technique several times on aircraft radio capacitive tank rotors, with socket headed set screws, that needed to be replaced on a rotating shaft. But that is very small scale.


In the last 15 years or so, I have used direct flame application from something as small as a butane torch up to and including an oxy/acetylene torch.



What I am saying is, heat works.
 

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I'd soak it with a penetrating oil. Worst case senerio is having to purchase a used shock assembly. Because there is some sort of a seal in that upper hydraulic tensioner assembly, be careful when using heat.

The only thing the small allen screw does it secure the position of that tensioner assembly from rotating, which because of hose routing, is critical.
 

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I'd soak it with a penetrating oil. Worst case senerio is having to purchase a used shock assembly. Because there is some sort of a seal in that upper hydraulic tensioner assembly, be careful when using heat.

The only thing the small allen screw does it secure the position of that tensioner assembly from rotating, which because of hose routing, is critical.
Thanks Greg and everyone else that made suggestions. I was afraid to apply heat and it was too small to use a torx on it. It was only a 2mm allen.

I ended up drilling it out and re-threading with a different size set screw.
 
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