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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I gave the procedure a try, and it just wasn't going to happen. I have to hand it to those that can work in tight spaces without being able to see what they are working on. I made a couple of feeble attempts at getting my ratchet in there, and there was no way it was going to happen.

So I figured since it only takes me about 20 minutes to take off the top shelter, I might as well just do that, and pull the tank. The bike is nearly 8 years old, and the weather is still too lousy to ride, so I might as well do some PM while I am at it.

From reading the procedure, it appears not all Wings are equal. I was only able to lift the tank about 1/2 inch. Others appear to be able to raise theirs quite a bit more. Also, everyone says that the biggest impediment in getting the tank out is the battery box. I had to also remove the relay tray, and still had a hard time because my main harness over where the fuse box is located kept jamming the tank. I thought I was going to damage the tank or the fuse box mounts when I pulled it out. I did use Stu's trick of spraying the tank with silicone before removing it.

Just thought I would share my thoughts. I still don't have it back together yet, but except for the tank, the rest of the job has been pretty easy. For those contemplating just refilling the suspension preload adjuster, and not messing with the shock/spring, the job is a piece of cake.

By the way, if you have a bike as old as mine, you may have a hard time getting the set screw out of the shock. Mine was seized pretty bad. I snapped one allen wrench, and twisted another one. I ended up getting it out by soaking it with rust dissolver for about 20 minutes, then using a 2mm insert bit in a 1/4 inch handle
 

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Shock and spring replacement

I replaced the rear spring on my 03 a few months ago. My gas tank was about half full and came right out with a little twist. The battery box didn't move very much and I didn't use any silicone spray. After replacing the spring dropped right back into place. I guess it's true that they are not all the same.
 

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Did mine (01) before I totalled it and was tedious but not hard. Just lots of STUFF to take off/disconnect. Watched Fred Harmons video before I did it and worked great.
 

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Removing rear shock

I work at a trike shop building Hannigans and we always remove the rear shock without removing the tank. Here are some pictures showing the proceedure. You have to modify the socket and it has to be a very thin walled socket. You reach up from the bottom and place the socket on the extension then put it on the nut.
http://picasaweb.google.com/dickgam...?authkey=Gv1sRgCIzsusLuvdK5cQ&feat=directlink

I've never done this on a fully assembled bike, but think it would still work. Note that there are some instructions under each picture when you blow it up.
 

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Larry

Your better off removing the fuel tank anyways IMO. That way you can inspect everything and do a good cleaning.

I just tore my bike down again to finally put those rubber donut bushing baack in that go into the fairing sub frame. I found them on the floor after I had the fairing off the bike. You were the one who identified the bushings a few months back...thank you. It was a pain and it didn't seem to make a difference with them back in, but I feel better knowing they are back where they are suppose to be instead of sitting on my shelf in my garage. :p
 

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Removing the fuel tank adds about 5 minutes to the job and maybe another 5 in replacing it. If you have to remove and replace the shock spring anyway, using the upper shock mount on the bike to bolt on the lower shock clevis is a neat Stu Oltman tip for using the bike as a work bench.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That was my thinking as well Roadie. I have never had a coolant leak or a ground problem, but it still doesn't hurt to go over everything after all this time.

Yeah, that was me that identified the bushing. I still haven't put mine back in yet. Thanks for the reminder. I may tackle that one this weekend as well. It is strange how that works. I didn't take the time to identify the bushing when it happened to me, but the moment someones else has the same bushing left over, then I research it.:shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Removing the fuel tank adds about 5 minutes to the job and maybe another 5 in replacing it. If you have to remove and replace the shock spring anyway, using the upper shock mount on the bike to bolt on the lower shock clevis is a neat Stu Oltman tip for using the bike as a work bench.

prs
LOL, I didn't use Stu's trick. I have this nice new shop with a great work bench, and this was my first big project, so I was determined to use the bench for something other than just holding parts. I got out the vise and did the whole thing on the bench.

I admit, that is a clever idea.
 

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It is strange how that works. I didn't take the time to identify the bushing when it happened to me, but the moment someones else has the same bushing left over, then I research it.:shrug:
It is funny how things work...for me when I found the bushings on the floor right after I just got done putting the bike back together after my frame change. I spend about 4 days going over in my mind on where that bushing could have gone..and then there was the answer in your post. I felt kind of dum that I didn't fiqure it out on my own. :p
 

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LarryM,
Check the 3 clamps on the hose from the waterpump (it turns down and goes to a wye) as 2 of the 3 on my 2005 were loose. They only allowed a small amount of coolant to weep but I could smell the occasional wiff of antifreeze. I had to pull the rear shock to get access to 2 of the clamps due to their orientation. So, it may be a good thing to pull the tank...

Safe Riding,

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Rick. I did give them a tightening. There was a slight amount of residue that indicates at some point some anti-freeze had leaked out, but it couldn't have been much. I don't think I have ever had to top off the resovoir.

I eneded up with a much bigger problem that would have required pulling the tank anyway. The shock didn't fit. I had to grind some metal off the top shock mount to get the shock to line up. It kept binding up.

I ended up having to loosen the battery tray. I couldn't get the tank back in no matter how hard I pushed or wiggled it. The moment the battery box loosened up, the tank just fell in place on its own.

Next time I will loosen the battery box first. It only takes a couple of minutes to pull a battery, and it should be disconnected before doing a job like this anyway. I doesn't make sense to skip the step, especially due to the grief it can cause.
 

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I did a spring replacement on the rear shock last night and it was tougher than what is being described here. I have an airbag model and the bag gets in the way. I have and watched Fred's videos. I used silicone spray and moved the battery box over as well. After I got it past the bag and tipped up, what I found that helped was removing the fuse box under the seat that was blocking it from twisting enough to release it. For me it was much longer than an addl 5 minutes but next time I will know where the choke points are.
 

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I had my suspension replaced with Wilbers shocks. The mechanic did not remove anything but the saddle on top of the bike. He removed the rear shock from the underside of the bike. He did have to remove the left exhaust. 20 to 30 min of work. To remove the upper bolt of the shock, he lifted the tank a little bit.

Eric
 

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When I did my 01 a few weeks ago the tank was in and out no problem. I did take the batt box out before even trying to lift the tank. I did it with about a third of tank of gas in it.
 

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Rear shock spring compressor

Does anyone have a Rear shock spring compressor tool that they will lend out?
i need to replace my spring and bought the tool but it was the wrong one. It was the compressor tool for the progressive shock spring
Let me know
Thanks
 

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I was hoping to have it for our chapter tech day this Sunday
 

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Shock and spring

Does anyone have a Rear shock spring compressor tool that they will lend out?
i need to replace my spring and bought the tool but it was the wrong one. It was the compressor tool for the progressive shock spring
Let me know
Thanks
I have the progressive tool and it works just fine on the stock shock
 
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