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Discussion Starter #1
I know, it's probably been asked before, but trying to search comes up with too much info not related - at least when I try. So, I'd appreciate any informed replies to the question: When the ambient temperature is 100 + degrees, perhaps as high as 115-120, should I reduce the "cold tire pressure" from 42psi (I normally run both front and rear at 42 psi)? I understand that if it's going to be that hot during the day, my "cold tire pressure' will be taken at a higher than usual temperature. So, I guess I'm really asking, should I make some kind of adjustment when the differential between the ambient temperature in the morning, when I check the "cold tire pressure," and what is expected as the days progresses, is significantly greater than say 20-25 degrees?
 

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A good question and I do not know the answer, last summer on the highway all day,speed about 80 and temp in the mid To high 80s,upon stopping for the day immediately took the rear tire pressure it was at 52 psi were normaly it's 42 so the pressure must vary greatly dependent on temp
 

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Well, you and I both are a bit over inflated according to Honda; but the answer to your question is NO. Tire heat is for the greatest part generated intrinsically. The flex of the tire materials results in heat. Less air equals more flex and more heat. Blow-outs most commonly occur on tires way underinflated. Do not exceed the side wall listed max pressure, but more air in the tire leads to less heat. The tire pressure is supposed to be set at the specified temp.

prs
 

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IronMan
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WHEN THE RETREAD COMES OFF ..... IT GOT TO HOT !!:shock::joke: AND ALSO WAS WONDERING GUYS WITH NITROGEN IN TIRES DOES HEAT CHANGE THERES ALSO ??
 

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According to Honda The correct pressure is 36 front and 41 rear, I think you should switch to the correct pressure .
 

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IronMan
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:roll::roll:IS THAT ON THERE DUNLOP :shock:;)
 

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Should you Tire Pressure

Great question. I run E3's at 42lbs too. The pressure was suggested by a long time GL 1800 friend who stated tires would last longer and handling would improve over factory suggestion. I am a new owner since September 2013 so have been "learning" how best to handle the Wing with said pressure and it does ride and handle like a dream.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies. I think Pigeon Roost has got it right; what he says makes sense to me. As for the 36/41 versus 42/42, I'm going with what my mechanic (JBJ Cycles) suggests for my Bridgestones. With the Traxxion suspension, I think I've more than compensated for any supposed diminution in front-end handling by raising the tire pressure, and my front tire lasts 1000s of miles longer.
 

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Am running my E3s at 38 front 42 rear ,with beads did 8500 miles in 3 weeks when they were new ,front now showing slight cupping, will put the front to 42 and see how that works
 

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Over inflating the tire causes the center to wear faster :thumbup:
 

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There is a direct correlation of pressure to air temp. For every 10 degrees there is a difference of 1 psi. (Rule of thumb) The best pressures to run are what the manufacture has posted on the vehicle. The manufacture and the RMA (rubber manufacture association) jointly decide the best pressure based on a number of factors. For this reason I run the recommended pressures. Two items at play here, never take the tire pressure to the maximum stated on the tire unless that is the recommended pressure. Keep in mind that the tire size may fit numerous vehicles with different recommendations. Also moving away from the recommended pressure could impact the amount of contact patch the tire has. Adding more pressure could decrease the overall amount of tire surface hitting the pavement. Too little could cause additional sidewall flexing resulting in additional heat, the number one killer of tires.

Tires will de-laminate once the temp reaches the same temperature it was cured at. Again rule of thumb, most tires are cured around 350 - 400 degrees (new tires), retreaded tires can be as low as 210 degrees. A properly maintained tire, pressure and load, will never come close to these temps. Utilizing informed facts and not using "tribal knowledge" usually results in better results, but then someone has gotten "lucky" running or doing something outside the parameters now it becomes the "gospel truth".
 

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It was discovered in a topic about a year ago here that there is a misconception of what the term "cold tire pressure" means. It DOES NOT mean that the tires have to be cold. Cold is defined as the internal tire temperature being equal to the outside temperature, or ambient temperature.

Tire pressure should always be adjusted before you ride. This assures the tire temp is at ambient. The unfortunate problem with this is that you might take off in the morning when temps are at 50 degrees, and later in the day it could be 100. Once you have been riding, you can't readjust it because the bike would have to sit for a couple of hours in the shade to return to ambient again. That is just not practical.

I do not have a good answer for this dilemma, except to say that manufacturers know of this problem when the method for checking pressure was devised. The tire is built to withstand this discrepancy, and it is unlikely that tire temp could run away.

Absolute perfection is unobtainable with tire pressure. Stay within the tire's load rating and speed and you will be fine.
 

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According to Honda The correct pressure is 36 front and 41 rear, I think you should switch to the correct pressure .
When this gentleman speaks......................I listen
36/41 will be my tire pressure for now on!
Actually at Americade this week Dunlap tire folks will be there checking tires......... I can ask them!

Ronnie
 

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In simple terms........No you do not adjust the pressure.

Check the tires when cold or before the ride, then ride.

As the day heats up the rubber compounds in the tires get more and more flexible with the heat. The air in the tires support the bike or vehicle and as the rubber compounds become more flexible more pressure is required to support the bike and the sidewalls of the tires.

So it all works out as designed by the tire manufacturers .

In hot temps tires will get so hot they will feel sticky to the touch. However if you let out some air, they will only get hotter and at that point you do run the risk of tire blowout.

This is how most of the time riders get into trouble with blowout, either the tire is not properly inflated to begin with or on a trip or touring the country, for whatever reason a tire does gain a small leak and lose pressure so while beating it down the highway the tire blows due to heat buildup.

Heat is a real problem on any bike where the rear tire is confined up in a fender well, surrounded by storage bags, exhaust, and heat of a rear drive. Temperature at a stop on a hot day will be quite high.

This is why the new bikes have vents that exit the rear, to help some with the heat.
 

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When this gentleman speaks......................I listen
36/41 will be my tire pressure for now on!
Actually at Americade this week Dunlap tire folks will be there checking tires......... I can ask them!

Ronnie
There are many tales and fables on forums. One does have to learn to just grin.

Increasing tire pressure especially on the front only increases the harshness of the ride and decreases the surface footprint of the tire on the road, therefore decreasing traction.

You will find that the Dunlop folks also will have varied opinions that differ from their published guidelines. Just depends on who you ask.
 

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I run my tires at 42 R and 39-40F with Dyna Beads, no matter what the ambient temperature and have had great results for about five years now. My last 3 sets were E 3's and got 15K plus on all 3 sets. Riding two up pulling a camper to Alaska a last year I started out with new E3 tires and 9.4K miles later(arriving home) I still had about 40 percent of tread life. Just changed over to Stones and we'll see how that goes. Just my experience folks.

Fred
 

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For touring riding I put 39/41.

For sporty riding in the twisties I lower to 36/39


Reference air pressure; what about elevation change?

Or riding when its gets colder during the day?


Just check the air pressure in the morning and put in what you feel is the correct pressure & ride. Check every morning & adjust.
 

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There are many tales and fables on forums. One does have to learn to just grin.

Increasing tire pressure especially on the front only increases the harshness of the ride and decreases the surface footprint of the tire on the road, therefore decreasing traction.

You will find that the Dunlop folks also will have varied opinions that differ from their published guidelines. Just depends on who you ask.
What psi are you running in the front tire, trike?
 

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What psi are you running in the front tire, trike?
36 psi. I might suggest to to the Lehman Trike Website and read the words of some very experienced folks about tires and tire pressures on a Trike. Once in a blue moon one finds those who do know from experience rather than opinion and repeated tales that become fact as they become repeated. ;) I also installed a BT-45 the very first day I got it home. That made a great difference in holding the line of travel also.
 

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Here is a little experiment I did a week or so ago.
My little tire pressure experiment.
I've been running my Vredestein run flat at 26 psi. Now that the temps have have finally reached the mid to upper 80s, I have been noticing the tire temp on my TPMS has been running 113 at 30 psi. I upped the pressure to 28 psi and now at 30 psi my tire temp is 103. Ride not quite as smooth, but I like the lower temp. Oh in my little experiment the pavement should have been about the same as it has been sunny and 86° out and done the same time of day.

http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?488153-2-up-10-down

 
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