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I just took my owners manual with me to buy motor oil for my first 2012 oil change (4K miles). The manual says 10W-30, SL or better, and not "energy conserving". Seems simple enough. However, I flipped to the back of nearly every jog of oil in the store, and only found one or two that was blank in the bottom of the logo. Eighty percent of the bottles had "Resource Conserving" and a few had "Energy Conserving". What's the difference between energy and resource conserving? Can I assume resource conserving oil is safe to use?
 

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Use Honda 10w30 or 10w40 and you will have no problems. 10w30 for cars may lead to clutch issues. Many use Rotella but, there seems to be varied opinions on shifting and clunking in the transmission. I have had two GL1800s, change oil more often than necessary (3000 miles) and neither has had shifting issues. Have always used Honda oil.
 

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I have always been a dinosaur oil user (Castrol GTX when I could) until last year when I did a coast to coast in a hurry and knew I would need to change around Chicago.

I don’t like stealerships to do anything unless I have to so I decided to try Synthetic Rotella T6 oil so I could do more miles with less changes. I changed in Chacgo at a friends house, drove all over Gods creation, and did it again in Denver at a friends house with the same, when I got back to Connecticut I decided I will just keep using it.

I’m not a picky kind of guy, the bike runs great, shifts when I tell it to & I go 7000 miles between changes.

Life is good! :shrug:
 

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You do not want to use oil that contains Molybdenum or Moly. It has friction modifiers in it that are bad for wet clutches...causes them to slip.

"Energy Conserving" usually means it does contain Moly

There are many threads on this, here is one...

http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105422
 

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This is a dumb question and I could try to look it up, but you guys give better explainations. You talk about the clutch being affected by the type motor oil you use. Am I to take it that the motor oil also bathes the clutch? Please educate me. Thanks.
 

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This is a dumb question and I could try to look it up, but you guys give better explainations. You talk about the clutch being affected by the type motor oil you use. Am I to take it that the motor oil also bathes the clutch? Please educate me. Thanks.
.

Yup. Unit construction engines share the same oil in the trannies/clutch as in the engines. Must work pretty well as they have been doing it for 50 years or so.
 

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I just took my owners manual with me to buy motor oil for my first 2012 oil change (4K miles). The manual says 10W-30, SL or better, and not "energy conserving". Seems simple enough. However, I flipped to the back of nearly every jog of oil in the store, and only found one or two that was blank in the bottom of the logo. Eighty percent of the bottles had "Resource Conserving" and a few had "Energy Conserving". What's the difference between energy and resource conserving? Can I assume resource conserving oil is safe to use?
You did the right thing by reading your owners manual. Per the manual, use a 10W-30 or 10W-40 that does not say energy-conserving or resource conserving. There are very few automotive oils in 10W-30 that are not energy conserving. There are a few 10W-40's. If you buy motorcycle oil, like Honda, Yamalube or Mobil 1 4T, you will pay a little more, but it will be formulated correctly for your engine, gearbox and especially clutch.
 

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use oil - any oil as it is all oil
Bad advice... most automotive oils that are 10W30 are "energy conserving" and you should not use them in a motorcycle.

You can use 10w40 oil, I've never found one that was "energy conserving", I've used Penzoil 10w40 many times before without problem. I decided to change to 10w30, so, I buy Honda brand now. I use Penzoil 10w40 in my KLR, as well as in my CBR 1000 RR.

This is a dumb question and I could try to look it up, but you guys give better explainations. You talk about the clutch being affected by the type motor oil you use. Am I to take it that the motor oil also bathes the clutch? Please educate me. Thanks.
As stated, yes it does. Pull off the oil fill cap on my KLR and you are looking right at the clutch...
 

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Marketing works wonderfully. You ever seen a Yamaha or Honda oil refinery?

You did the right thing by reading your owners manual. Per the manual, use a 10W-30 or 10W-40 that does not say energy-conserving or resource conserving. There are very few automotive oils in 10W-30 that are not energy conserving. There are a few 10W-40's. If you buy motorcycle oil, like Honda, Yamalube or Mobil 1 4T, you will pay a little more, but it will be formulated correctly for your engine, gearbox and especially clutch.
 

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J.D., yes that is a problem, as you have noticed, and this is a problem that is becoming more difficult for motorcycists every year. We may come to a point sometime in the near future where we will no longer be able to take advantage of the lower price of automotive oils.

Here's the problem. As someone pointed out earlier, Moly is the substance that is bad for a wet clutch. Unfortunately, oil manufacturers normally will not disclose their formulations, for competitive reasons. So there isn't any way to tell what oils have moly in them.

As you found out by reading your owner's manual, there is a way to be assured that an oil DOESN'T have moly in it. Moly is used exclusively in energy conserving oil. There are some energy conserving oils that do not have moly, but there is no way to be certain. So the best course of action is to just stay away from any oil that is labeled energy conserving.

You can look for the JASO MA certification, which means the oil has been certified for wet clutch use. But most oil manufacturers don't spend the money for JASO MA certification. That means there are a number of automotive oils out there that are perfectly fine for motorcycles, but just haven't been certified.

In the end, you have three choices. You can stick with motorcycle specific oil, which is unreasonably expensive. Or you can limit yourself to oils that have been JASO MA certified. Or you can give yourself the widest selection of oils possible by just looking for the energy conserving label. The method of selection that you choose will all depend on how much legwork and research you are willing to do.

Online lists of suitable products are usually outdated a week after they are published, because formulations change quite often. That makes those lists less helpful. You have to check the labels every time you shop for oil.
 

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I just took my owners manual with me to buy motor oil for my first 2012 oil change (4K miles). The manual says 10W-30, SL or better, and not "energy conserving". Seems simple enough. However, I flipped to the back of nearly every jog of oil in the store, and only found one or two that was blank in the bottom of the logo. Eighty percent of the bottles had "Resource Conserving" and a few had "Energy Conserving". What's the difference between energy and resource conserving? Can I assume resource conserving oil is safe to use?
In this context 'resource' should be considered the same and 'energy', and be avoided.

With the advent of E85, and Turbo engines using E85, the new standard ''resource conserving'' was introduced so I can be further confused with selecting oil for my modern automobile.


...louie
 

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Buy recommended weight from a motorcycle shop besides they have other things that might interest you
 

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Resource Conserving is the new label that API has recently approved and my understanding is that now it is going to be placed on all viscosity oils. In the past, you could get certain viscosity oils (like 20w-50 or 15w-50 or 10w-40) that were not labeled as Energy Conserving, and thus didn't have moly in them. I believe this is all going to change, and soon you won't find any automotive oils that are not labeled as "Resource Conserving".

I have not yet been able to determine if all oils labeled as "Resource Conserving" will have molybdenum disulphide in them but my suspicion is that they will, since this is a big part of what makes them get better gas mileage.

http://www.imakenews.com/lng/e_article001747038.cfm?x=bgSkfQK,bcTct9Wq

http://www.api.org/certifications/engineoil/new/upload/1509techbull1complete.pdf

2.3.2.5.2 Resource Conserving in Conjunction with API Service Category SN
API Service SN engine oils designated as Resource Conserving are formulated to help improve fuel economy and protect vehicle emission system components in passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, vans, and light-duty trucks powered by gasoline engines. These oils have demonstrated a fuel economy improvement (FEI) in the Sequence VID test at the percentages listed in Table 1 when compared with a baseline oil (BL) used in the Sequence VID test. Additionally, these oils have demonstrated in the tests listed in Table 1 that they provide greater emission system and turbocharger protection and help protect engines when operating on ethanol-containing fuels up to E85.
Many previous S-categories made reference to “Energy Conserving,” but this reflected an emphasis on fuel-economy performance alone. Resource Conserving in conjunction with API SN focuses on fuel economy, emission system and turbocharger protection, and compatibility with ethanol-containing fuel up to E85.
Starting October 1, 2010, oils that have passed the tests at the limits shown in Table 1 and are properly licensed by API may display “Resource Conserving” in the lower portion of the API Service Symbol in conjunction with API Service SN in the upper portion. The fuel economy and other resource conserving benefits obtained by individual vehicle operators using engine oils labeled Resource Conserving may differ because of many factors, including the type of vehicle and engine, engine manufacturing variables, the mechanical condition and maintenance of the engine, oil that has been previously used, operating conditions, and driving habits. Before the October 1, 2010, introduction date, oil marketers may license oils meeting Resource Conserving in conjunction with API Service SN as Energy Conserving in conjunction with API Service SM.
 

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At this point, we don't know how"resource conserving" affects a motorcycle engine's requirements. It may just be an extension of the energy conserving standard. So we should probably say away from it until Honda addresses it in owner's manuals.

To be eligible for the resources conserving label, a multi-grade oil must be 0w, 5w, or 10w. You will not see a resource conserving label on a 15w or 20w oil, which will still leave a lot of choices for quite some time. If you use a 15w-40 or 20w-50 oil, you have nothing to worry about.
 

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Hey JD, what oil do you use in your '05? Use that in your 2012 - it's the same engine.
I agree that your approach makes sense. The engine has been unchanged in 10 years. The problem is that oils have changed.

As an example, The 01 and 02 owner's manuals did not state anything about avoiding energy conserving oil. At the time, even though EC oils had been out for a couple of years, manufacturers did not know about their detrimental affects on clutches. They began including the exclusion of EC oils in later models.

My point is that if Honda further clarifies their recommendations on later models that have the same engine, it is probably a good idea for owners of earlier models to also follow those guidelines. That is what I did. Up until I read about the EC oil problem, I had used Castrol GTX for many years, not paying attention to the starburst label.
 

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I've used nothing by Mobil 1 (automotive, not motorcycle specific) in my motorcycles for the past seven years. Two Goldwings, one ST1300, FJR and Concours. It does not say "engergy conserving" or any such language, and I've never had a problem with it.
 
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