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Discussion Starter #1
Thinking of building my own and have a few questions.

Anyone built one and have pics or tips?

I believe the hitch needs to allow the trailer to move up and down, what about side to side? I assume the trailer wheel stays in the same plane as the bike wheel when cornering.
 

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The hitch that came with my Uni-Go trailer was just an everyday automotive type u-joint. It allowed the trailer to move up & down, turn right & left, but locked it to the bike as far as roll (lean ?).
Ken
 

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Single-wheel trailers

Single-wheel trailers have some positive things going for them. However, tongue weight is not one of them. Be very careful about weight. The single-wheel trailer puts a lot of stress on the hitch and extra weight on rear of the bike. Overloading can be a serious (and dangerous) problem. Just a caution. :shock:
 

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Grumpy Fart
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One wheel trailer

I built a saddle bag one wheel trailer but aborted the idea because of concerns about the stress that would be put on the Goldwing frame (and I was using a Rivco hitch). I'll sell you the parts cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What do you have? You aren't too far from me.


I built a saddle bag one wheel trailer but aborted the idea because of concerns about the stress that would be put on the Goldwing frame (and I was using a Rivco hitch). I'll sell you the parts cheap.
 

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The hitch pin needs to be a SOLID vertical pin.

The connection is a vertical tube over that pin, with a horizontal joint either ahead of, or behind it.

You CAN use a simple U-joint, but the problem will be realized when you lean the bike over in a tight turn. the U-joint has the axis of both joints on the same plane. This means that when ONE axis leans (the bike is leaning to the side) and the trailer is turned to one side or the other, the other axis is also forced to lean (forcing the trailer to want to lay over on it's side unless it is precisely in line with the bike). With the axis of the horizontal joint ahead of or behind the vertical joint, when the bike leans over, the horizontal joint will rotate around the vertical pin and the trailer will remain vertical.

Check out this hitch and trailer that I built for my friend Sean. This is "The Colgan Hitch." His idea and design, my welding and fabrication!

http://www.myspace.com/elraisuli/photos/11235727#%7B%22ImageId%22%3A11235731%7D



For this particular scooter, I modified the original intent of the hitch a bit so that the bike would tow either the single-wheel trailer or the traditional ball hitch trailer. The hitch pivots on grade-8 bolts at the ball hitch plate and the shock mount bolts, as well as at the two top bolts. When the rear suspension is compressed, the ball remains in line with the bike, but moves backward slightly and the ball mount plate rotates slightly backward with the geometry.




In order for the trailer to remain vertical when it is turned and the bike leans over (on the side stand, for instance) the two joints CANNOT be on the same plane.

In this photo, you can see that I simply welded two tubes together, at 90 degrees, so the axis of each tube was on a different plane. This SOLVED the tip over issue. It is up to you whether you want to place a tube spacer between the two tubes so that the vertical joint and the horizontal joint are farther apart, but it isn't necessary.









Once the proper bolt was selected, it was welded into place. A crown nut with a cotter pin or R-Hook goes through a hole drilled at the correct point so the nut will not back off when the trailer turns from side to side.



This is the shortened tongue! This tongue used to be 12 feet long, and had a brace at the front. the scooter towed a 17 foot canoe on top!

 

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I built one 2 years ago based on a Unigo chassis I found on another website. The tailer had no pod and being a sheet metal tech I built my own box from 6061-T6 aluminum. Here's a link to my build.

http://rides.webshots.com/album/575925469YzhDvU





After adding a steering stabilizer it became a very nice trailer behind the GSA. The addition of a longer drawbar would also have been a benefit, maybe next time.

Before its sale I logged well over 7000 trouble free miles. Amazing how well it tracked behind the bike. Followed the bike so well you couldn't help but look back at times to make sure it was still there.
 
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