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Anyone trying this on a 2018-19 DCT. I'm using rain mode, still haven't touched a peg, much less all the way around.


Just curious what others are experiencing.
 

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This thread has motivated me to start working on my slow speed maneuvering. With that said, I ordered and installed some Peg Savers. Thought I'd pass along how I marked the holes. Using the steps outlined in the pics below I got the holes accurately drilled first time without the need to enlarge an off-center hole.









** Tadpole - Thanks for catching my error. I reposted with the correct 5/16" size.


Wish mine went this easy, the first peg was a learning curve. I had to widen the hole a little because it was difficult getting it centered.

What helped me the most was using a reamer to widen the hole. The second peg went perfectly and the reamer helped my progress as well!


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One thing I’ve found that has improved my skills even more is putting little or no weight on the bars. The bike is more flickable and I’m less apt to move the controls.

Also the brake really helps get the turns tighter. Throwing in rear break in a circle in first gear is a little unnerving at first. But I’ve been learning to trust it more and more. Left turns are easier right now. Something difficult about using the rear brake in right circles that’s difficult, but I’m getting there. My break is hard to feather even though i upgraded to a bigger kury break pedal.



Still have a lot of trouble keeping the weight on the clutch side light, especially during the slow cone weave. This is still one of the most difficult RLAP exercises.

Any advice for keeping a steady clutch?



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Discussion Starter #244
Stay out of 1st gear. Please reread the beginning of the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #245
Anyone trying this on a 2018-19 DCT. I'm using rain mode, still haven't touched a peg, much less all the way around.


Just curious what others are experiencing.
dct is different. You can not replicate the lesson plan on a dct.

That being said... some video was posted last week to fb of me dragging while 2up on a 2018 dct.
 

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Discussion Starter #246
One thing I’ve found that has improved my skills even more is putting little or no weight on the bars. The bike is more flickable and I’m less apt to move the controls.

Also the brake really helps get the turns tighter. Throwing in rear break in a circle in first gear is a little unnerving at first. But I’ve been learning to trust it more and more. Left turns are easier right now. Something difficult about using the rear brake in right circles that’s difficult, but I’m getting there. My break is hard to feather even though i upgraded to a bigger kury break pedal.



Still have a lot of trouble keeping the weight on the clutch side light, especially during the slow cone weave. This is still one of the most difficult RLAP exercises.

Any advice for keeping a steady clutch?



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I need to reprogram you. Forget RLP.

Please reread the beginning of the thread and follow the plan.
 

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I need to reprogram you. Forget RLP.

Please reread the beginning of the thread and follow the plan.

DJ, even Jerry tells GW riders to use 2nd gear when doing his exercises. First gear on a GW is too "touchy".


And I think your method of doing circles is a better way of learning to decrease your turning radius and learning to lean the bike farther over and turn the handlebars more in a turn.


I'm obviously not an instructor, but I feel Jerry's weak part of his instruction videos is not emphasizing the "turning of the bars" more. He's what I mean: A motorcycle turns by leaning ...this only PART true. Yes, it WILL turn by leaning, but it will not very SHARLY by JUST leaning. To turn a bike tightly, like a U-turn on a street, you have to lean the bike AND turn the handlebars at slow speed to make that tight a turn. Do you not?
 

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If you do not turn the bars at low speed you will not turn. If you only lean at low speed you will fall over.

I think a better statement is that on two wheels at anything above, don't know exactly but let's say 20 mph, you lean by turning.
 
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The Motorman contends that simply turning your head and eyes, the handlebars will follow.

Coupled with leaning the bike, clutch friction zone and a little rear brake, you make the turn.

When I finished my class he told me to practice without using the rear brake.
From what I understand the new motor officer course eliminates rear brake use after day 1. Not sure if that is true or not.
Because my street is narrower than the norm (20.5 ft.), it forces me to make tighter u-turns and circles.

That being said, I'm dumping RLAP for now and relearning using DJFire's technique. Motorman's class is good training, but if you don't bring a Harley to his party, he kind of leaves you in the weeds. (JMHO)
I think I can do better when the instructor is actually a GW rider.
 

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The Motorman contends that simply turning your head and eyes, the handlebars will follow.


I don't think he said it way. He said "the motorcycle will go where you look". NO it won't. There's a lot more to it than that. IF you've ever seen a person do a left u-turn with "head & eyes" looking back over their RIGHT shoulder, you'll know that statement isn't true. I don't need a "trick phrase" to teach me to do something that the instructor wants me to do, but he doesn't know how to convey it to me correctly. I'm smart enough for it to be explained to me , AND understand it without that crap.


Here's the thing. Jerry's a friend of mine and has been for a long time. And he has taught a gazillion folks to ride their bikes better. I applaud him for that and I hope his business keeps growing leaps and bounds.



And he taught me to do ALL the exercises in that RLAP course. I just want to be able to turn in less than 24 ft, and right now, I can't do it and it pi$$es me off beyond belief! LOL!



But he makes claims that you can do that in about 8 hrs or less. Well then why does it take the cops from Monday Morning to sometime during Thursday before they "GET IT" ? That's where I have a small problem with some of Jerry's statements. It's the "COP" in him.



I'll confess though. I have put in hours of practice for years, and I still can't get over that feeling of the bike falling over on me. It's that feeling where when you are learning, you put your foot down real quickly because you feel the bike is staring to fall. That's what happens to me when I try to turn too tightly. And it scares me, I'll admit. And I don't want to tear up my bike practicing this tight 18ft u-turn when I obviously am missing some part of the puzzle.



I guess I'm going to have to get a local motorman to do some one on one time with me. Plus find some stuff to tape up my fairing so it doesn't get all banged up. I could care less about the crash bars. All the scratches to them are on the underneath of them and not seen.
 

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Try the GWRRA Advanced Rider Course. It was terrific!
 
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I did my ARC course in Sport mode 1st & 2nd gear, no issues! I am used to the snappy throttle in Sport mode and I practice a LOT!! Anytime you cruise in to a parking lot full of bikes & pull off a very tight circle, every rider is watching! Believe me . . .
 

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Hey Joe, I found keeping my head up, and exaggerating this, I’m able to lean further and also keep an eye of what’s going on. If i look down at all when im leaning it throws the bike of balance. I feel like the same things you do trying to stay balanced athletically apply here. If Im standing on one foot I try to look straight ahead and head up. I’ve been learning that riding the motorcycle relies much more on your peripheral vision. When I do cone weaves and I look straight ahead, even up, the cones feel more spacious. As soon as I look at them I have less room. I practice being aware of peripheral vision when I’m riding in traffic too. The moment I look at an obstacle I go towards it, but when I’m calmly aware of it in my periphery it I avoid it better:




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Man O Man! I can't thank you enough. You have explained the concept of "you look down, you're going down" in a manner I can understand, and how it applies to slow speed skills. You said looking down in a turn throws off the balance of the bike. NOW THAT MAKES SENSE!

I have seen so many videos of Cops at their Skills Competitions where they are definitely looking down at the cones in some of those pattern exercises. So that, to me, debunks the "look down, go down" theory. And when I saw it happen in every one of those videos at different locations, I asked why are we taught that? I didn't understand. Well, they could actually ride some ff those patterns with their eyes closed because they have done it so much.

But YOUR explanation is the first I have read that really explains WHY we are taught that way. It helps ME to understand the "why" of something if I am to learn.
 

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DJ,

In 2004 and 2005 I watched Jerry "Motorman" Palladino demonstrate Slow Riding and Control on a Gold Wing and on his Harley Davidson at the Honda Homecoming in Maryville, OH.

He produced the Ride Like a Pro Video's over the years.

It was very interesting to watch him perform.
 

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I have seen so many videos of Cops ... looking down at the cones in some of those pattern exercises.
Just to add, these guys are pros, their skills are so high and their control so automatic, that they can do that without a problem. They are riding patterns where they sometimes have less than an inch of tolerance, so they are looking EXACTLY where the tires are in relation to the cones.

Kind of like a pro baseball player who can ignore most of the rules we learned about how to catch a ball, because they have such a highly developed level of skill. They can catch balls over their shoulders, jumping in the air, climbing a wall, looking with one eye, starting the run before the ball's in the glove, etc, all the stuff that would have had us running laps.
 

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Where has DJ fire been? Have not noticed any post in awhile.
Life happened...

Sorry folks, I have been away for a while.

The gold goldwing is no mas thanks to a deer last year. I am ok... didn't even put the bike down but am now on a new 2016 and am getting it dialed in but she has much to do as yet.

Please consider this bump a friendly reminder to drag a peg today! 😇
 
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