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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have had my 2012 GW for two months now. Today for the second time and in the exact same spot at work I pulled up to stop to back into concrete parking spot. Had handlebars turned to the right and bike fell over to the right. No damage landed on side guards. Got help to pick it up. If this happens enough times should I replace side guards because they get bent? Very embarrassing. Also I do not know what is exactly happening? Any and all help greatly appreciated.
Love yours. D
 

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I'd suggest that you only come to a Stop, with Wheel Straight Ahead and No Leaning.


Beyond that, I find it V-E-R-Y helpful to hang your legs down (feet just skimming the pavement) for the last remaining ~10ft or so... As that enables you to still have some Steering/Lean Control while "Shifting your Weight" (that occurs with the leg movement).


On (lighter) sportbikes I always tried coming to a stop like a gymnast, just B-A-M!!!!... Both stopping and planting feet at same time. But the the wing, I find that a Longer Transition (before the Stop) is manditory, and results in a graceful ending.


I would not replace the crash guards unless you visually observe Cracking to occur. You can bend steel quite a few times (over a short distance) before it breaks.
 

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trike it out!
Best move I ever made!!

Ronnie
 
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I'll go the opposite of what Alex says. Keep your right foot on the peg and use it for your rear brake. DO NOT USE YOUR FRONT BRAKE WITH THE WHEEL TURNED AT SLOW SPEED. If you can make the turn and get the wheel straight or almost straight do that before you take your feet off the pegs. Remember to turn your head and keep your eyes up.
 

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I'm gonna be UNCLEJOHN for a moment...…..quit going to work.:grin2:
 

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I'd suggest that you only come to a Stop, with Wheel Straight Ahead and No Leaning.


Beyond that, I find it V-E-R-Y helpful to hang your legs down (feet just skimming the pavement) for the last remaining ~10ft or so... As that enables you to still have some Steering/Lean Control while "Shifting your Weight" (that occurs with the leg movement).


On (lighter) sportbikes I always tried coming to a stop like a gymnast, just B-A-M!!!!... Both stopping and planting feet at same time. But the the wing, I find that a Longer Transition (before the Stop) is manditory, and results in a graceful ending.


I would not replace the crash guards unless you visually observe Cracking to occur. You can bend steel quite a few times (over a short distance) before it breaks.
:agree:
 

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Backing up is like having the rear brake on when you release the starter-reverse button. So if the front wheel is turned, I believe this is your issue. A sudden stop and over it goes. Need to have a lot of leg support on the side the wheel is turned to. It's just the technique used.
I always back up with the front wheel straight. However I rarely have a situation where I need to back up. But it's a great feature on the Goldwing.


Corventure Dave
 

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I have had my 2012 GW for two months now. Today for the second time and in the exact same spot at work I pulled up to stop to back into concrete parking spot. Had steering wheel turned to the right and bike fell over to the right. No damage landed on side guards. Got help to pick it up. If this happens enough times should I replace side guards because they get bent? Very embarrassing. Also I do not know what is exactly happening? Any and all help greatly appreciated.
Love yours. D

Put handlebars on that thing. A steering wheel is just dangerous! :surprise:

A drop is unlikely to cause any damage to the crash bars. Using the front brake only when handlebars are turned will take the bike down. Keep the bars straight until you have it on the side or center stand.
Learn the proper technique to lift the bike
 

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Do your swing to place the bike for the reverse manoeuvre but finish the swing with the front wheel straight for a foot or so. The bike will be upright and balanced just as it is in a straight line stop. The Wing is a difficult bike to stop slowly, there's plenty of threads about that, so, make the swing, straighten up and stop firmly. Put it into reverse and swing the bars to align with your parking spot. When reversing, leaning the bike to the opposite side to the turn can sometimes help with stability.
 

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How tall are you? If you're vertically challenged, it's not a matter of if you'll have a tip over, it's a matter of when, and now that has been answered. So you can follow the options provided above and adjust the way you approach your parking spot, or adjust the bike to accommodate your stature. I'm 5'8" and have had to suck up my ego a few times. I recently installed a lowering kit on my Wing, and since then haven't had a single problem in the parking lot, doing U-turns, starting, or stopping. A mere 3/4" changed the way I look at my bike and the way it handles. I'm not saying it's the perfect solution or it's for everyone, but it's an option. As to the crash bars, that's what they're there for. Unless you tag the pavement at speed, they should be fine. Good luck and ride safe.
 

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I'll go the opposite of what Alex says. Keep your right foot on the peg and use it for your rear brake. DO NOT USE YOUR FRONT BRAKE WITH THE WHEEL TURNED AT SLOW SPEED. If you can make the turn and get the wheel straight or almost straight do that before you take your feet off the pegs. Remember to turn your head and keep your eyes up.

I agree with this. My driveway is very steep and I have to back out and turn the bike about 90 degrees to go down to the street. Looking up and only using the rear brake have prevented me from falling over. Also as I come to a stop at lights for the last bit I release the front and complete the stop using only the rear brake. Good luck and keep practicing.
 

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I recommend signing up for a MSF riding course.

They're teach you good techniques.

After I took a long break from riding, I returned and took a Basic Riding Skills course by MSF to install good habits.

I learned several new techniques and that I had some bad habits too .

I also witnessed first hand what happens when a rider doesn't have a straight front wheel when you turn. He was riding a small Honda Rebel 300cc bike and he executed a slow speed turn and hit his front brakes hard. Over the handlebars he went. Luckily and only skinned his knee and ripped his pants.

Take a course when you have time. I'm looking forward to an intermediate street riding course in the spring.
 
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As some have mentioned, a front wheel in the turn position and the front brake does not work, it will get you into trouble almost every time.
 

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5 rules to riding a 2-whl 5th gen. Here is the good news about these rules. 5th gens fall over, and if you don't learn these rules here, it is guaranteed that you'll learn them out there.

1. They only like pavement ... stay off grass and dirt.
2. If you go into a curve to hot, push harder !!! Never stand them up.
3. Always when at 0mph, be sure your bars are straight.
4. To park them, unless on a MSF coarse, never use your kill switch. Be in gear with clutch in, come to a stop, kill the engine by lowering the side stand, let clutch out and allow Wing to roll to take slack out of drive train, then set stand.
5. Can't remember :(
 
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