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Agree - straight front wheel while stopping is very important - but sometimes not an option. Also agree that use of front brake in that situation can result in extreme embarrassment. A late friend of mine (Roadrunner1800) once made that mistake knowing beforehand it was potential trouble while doing a turn-around - but having a brain cramp - ended up on his ample belly on a sloped Burger King parking lot with his Gold Wing muffler guard on top of his foot trapping him until a good Samaritan helped get him released. Three of his toes were purple for a long time after that and and since it was his right foot - shifting was excruciating. I met him in that lot soon after his "release" for a ride that we did go on to complete. He was very embarrassed but good natured about his "rookie" mistake.. Allen was a good riding partner and I miss those times.
Larry, I also miss those good O' days, myself................[especially the Allen vs. Larry) part of it! ;)
As you know, Allen, saved my life, (and Uncle John) I also miss riding with Allen (Roadrunner 1800) [He was totally one of a kind for sure!]

Ronnie
 

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Agree - straight front wheel while stopping is very important - but sometimes not an option. Also agree that use of front brake in that situation can result in extreme embarrassment. A late friend of mine (Roadrunner1800) once made that mistake knowing beforehand it was potential trouble while doing a turn-around - but having a brain cramp - ended up on his ample belly on a sloped Burger King parking lot with his Gold Wing muffler guard on top of his foot trapping him until a good Samaritan helped get him released. Three of his toes were purple for a long time after that and and since it was his right foot - shifting was excruciating. I met him in that lot soon after his "release" for a ride that we did go on to complete. He was very embarrassed but good natured about his "rookie" mistake.. Allen was a good riding partner and I miss those times.

It just became apparent to me that I should have said "since it was his LEFT foot" - not right foot. Who shifts with their right foot??? 馃榿
 

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I have a similar issue, but it is with taking off after a stop. My front wheel seems to want to go left or right instead of straight when i take off. Its very noticeable to me and I have been trying to figure out what I am doing to cause this. Dont think its a bike issue as it can go either left or right. Thought I might be pushing on one one side of the bar when I started accelerating but have been watching that and dont think its the issue.
 

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Interesting video on YouTube posted recently from MCRider on this exact topic.

I am a rear brake only, left foot down. Practicing with the rear brake is the key to any low speed maneuvering, imo.
What if the left side surface is significantly lower than the right?
 

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Go to a big wide open parking lot and practice coming to a stop. Like mentioned earlier try and balance all the way to a complete stop. Learn to judge the stopping distance so that your not coming up to the stop point to fast, slow down ease into the stop and look strait ahead and try to keep your balance feet on pegs until stopped or as close to it as you can and with practice you can literally be stopped with no feet down while balancing and then place feet down. If you can do this in the parking lot it will then raise your street game. When you master this then it鈥檚 time to practice emergency stops. Take a good motorcycle class and I guarantee you will learn at least one thing that could save your life.


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Discussion Starter #27
Interesting video on YouTube posted recently from MCRider on this exact topic.
Yeah, that's what got me more inclined to work on this. Did you notice he didn't use his Wing in the demo videos? Hmmm.
 

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One of my Harley friend took an advance riding course a couple years ago, he was preaching to me the other day that a rider should only put his left foot down at a stop and keep his right foot on the rear brake. This is so that he can take off quickly in case of some distracted drivers may rear end him. My friend also said he is doing this left foot down only about 90% of the time, the both feet down at stop is a 鈥渞ookie move鈥.
I said to him, I don鈥檛 care if it is rookie move or not, if I drop the bike, then it is real a rookie. I keep my right hand on the front brake and can roll on just as fast as if I wasn't.
Kenny
 

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Discussion Starter #29
One of my Harley friend took an advance riding course a couple years ago, he was preaching to me the other day that a rider should only put his left foot down at a stop and keep his right foot on the rear brake. This is so that he can take off quickly in case of some distracted drivers may rear end him. My friend also said he is doing this left foot down only about 90% of the time, the both feet down at stop is a 鈥渞ookie move鈥.
I said to him, I don鈥檛 care if it is rookie move or not, if I drop the bike, then it is real a rookie. I keep my right hand on the front brake and can roll on just as fast as if I wasn't.
Kenny
Your friend鈥檚 comments parrot the MCRider advice, IIRC. Thing is, you can keep the bike in gear with both feet down. Since I got rear-ended 1.5 years ago I always heed that advice. But as I see it it is mostly unrelated to 1 or 2 feet down.
 

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That's the technique taught here in the UK and the way I learned and whilst I can normally make it happen, on my GW it is not guaranteed. On my Rocket and Suzuki it's easy enough. It's that last split second possible fall to the right that needs to be covered on the GW. It's a bit of a mystery but I do wonder if it's because the brake pedal action is vertically down on the GW and I'm occasionally a little heavier on the pedal and tilt the bike whereas it's a push away on the other bikes. I have purchased another bike but it's in lockdown at the dealer, when I finally am able to get it it'll be interesting to see how it deals with stopping.
 

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To cause the bike to favor the left foot down learn to give a tiny bit of push to the left grip at the last moment. It's important to completely square the handlebars with the shoulders while braking to the last foot or two and at the last moment a tiny amount of countersteer will 100% of the time guarantee the bike will favor the grip you push. If the stopping conditions such as slope or uneven pavement favor the right foot then the countersteer will be the right grip.
 

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To cause the bike to favor the left foot down learn to give a tiny bit of push to the left grip at the last moment.
When I bought the GW, it leaned right at stops about 1/3rd of the time.
Just sayin what worked for me, I found that extending my left foot as I slowed through about 2-3mph, my bike favored the left every time.
 

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I need to work on my stops with the GW and am looking for advice
All advise given is good, but I find my physical condition determines my stopping ability/skill. When I am fresh and starting out, I make very smooth, controlled stops. After I've been riding awhile, I find I spend more time determining my stopping strategy. Towards the end of a long ride (especially with my passenger on board), I find myself "Bobbling & Wobbling" at stops. If it is a hot, humid day, this becomes much more evident.
At these times, I apply equal braking, and creep to the stop, with both feet extended. Every bike I've owned over 800 lb's. Has given me this issue. Every bike I've had under 700 lb's hasn't. I think a lot of the problem is fatigue, coupled with weight vs. balance.
 

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To cause the bike to favor the left foot down learn to give a tiny bit of push..... at the last moment a tiny amount of countersteer will 100% of the time guarantee the bike will favor the grip you push. If the stopping conditions such as slope or uneven pavement favor the right foot then the countersteer will be the right grip.
Oh, I like that one, I'll deffo give it a try. It's weird how this is only a problem on a Goldwing.
 

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It just became apparent to me that I should have said "since it was his LEFT foot" - not right foot. Who shifts with their right foot??? 馃榿
Who shifts with their right foot.......I do when riding my BSA. Enough said....!!
 

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I have a similar issue, but it is with taking off after a stop. My front wheel seems to want to go left or right instead of straight when i take off. Its very noticeable to me and I have been trying to figure out what I am doing to cause this. Dont think its a bike issue as it can go either left or right. Thought I might be pushing on one one side of the bar when I started accelerating but have been watching that and dont think its the issue.
Try leaving a little more room between you and the car/truck in front of you. This will allow you to take off at a steady speed without having to slow down again because you're coming up to the rear of the guy in front of you. Not having to roll off the gas then back onto it will keep your wheel straight. If you have to slow down as to not rear end the guy in front of you you won't turn the wheel. NO AFTER BURNER TAKEOFFS!
 

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I think some of you have no damn business on a GW. You better go get yourself a 250cc dirt bike and ride the **** outta it before you get on the street !!
 

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Hell, I started out riding a Honda 50cc scooter (at 16 yrs old) and after even after 53 years of always having a bike in my garage... We all will have a problem or two, in some point of our lives...
Heck Riding with Larry (greyhound) last season, I went down w/o even knowing what happened :ROFLMAO: ( Larry remember that horrible day?? :eek: (sorry again!)

Ronnie
 
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