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After Allen's tip over, I imagine he was wishing he had a Brit bike for awhile.
I missed that ride (but heard about it) I can only wish / that I was with you guys that day..........( I still think about Allen quite often/I miss him) ...most of all I kinda miss your "both disagreements" I also miss our breakfast get togethers, and watching Allen pour salt all over his food....and his drinking of beers instead of coffee....That man SAVED MY LIFE! ( and got my motorcycle back to safety) If it wasn't for Allen, I'd not only be dead, BUT I not have a motorcycle either..............
Miss yea Allen!
Ronnie
 

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Hell, I started out riding a Honda 50cc scooter (at 16 yrs old) and after even after 53 years of always having a bike in my garage... We all will have a problem or two, in some point of our lives...
Heck Riding with Larry (greyhound) last season, I went down w/o even knowing what happened :ROFLMAO: ( Larry remember that horrible day?? :eek: (sorry again!)

Ronnie
Yeah - I remember the sound of your wing behind me suddenly making sounds like it was going down the road on its side rather than on its tires. Then the impact of your front tire on my rear fender.. Remember it well. Fortunately, it was slow speed and nobody got hurt. We continued and completed the planned ride. Still a secret from certain people...
 

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One of my Harley friend took an advance riding course a couple years ago, he was preaching to me the other day that a rider should only put his left foot down at a stop and keep his right foot on the rear brake. This is so that he can take off quickly in case of some distracted drivers may rear end him. My friend also said he is doing this left foot down only about 90% of the time, the both feet down at stop is a “rookie move”.
I said to him, I don’t care if it is rookie move or not, if I drop the bike, then it is real a rookie. I keep my right hand on the front brake and can roll on just as fast as if I wasn't.
Kenny
Both feet down is no "rookie move" at all. It's the best way to balance the bike, bar none. And I can take off as fast as anyone from a standstill. All I have to do is roll on the throttle. I always keep my eye on what's behind me at a stop. I have BOTH feet down, bike in gear with clutch pulled in, and right hand on front brake lever, with thumb on the grip. If I need to pull away quickly, my right thumb rolls the throttle, my left hand lets out the clutch, and "away we go". Feet then go on the floorboards as we start rolling. It's all so quick that it seems as if it's ONE SINGLE MOVE.

Can I stop with just the left foot down? YES. But WHY? What's the advantage? To me, There sure seems to be a lot of non-advantage with it. Now if you have legs like tree trunks, I guess balance isn't a problem with only one foot. My legs aren't tree trunks so that doesn't work for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Woo.... did someone rattle your cage?!
;)
In the tale of the scorpion and the frog, somebody has to be the scorpion...
 

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When I come to a stop, I try to be pointed at an exit. I've tried the "only left foot down" thing, but depending on the slope of the road surface and the direction of exit I sometimes want the bike to be upright, and I'll put both feet down. In fact I'm more comfortable having the bike balanced and upright, knowing that if someone is coming up fast from behind there are a lot of things that need to happen at once to get out of the way.

I've practiced taking off with the bike upright using both feet down and the handbrake, and I've practiced taking off with the left foot down using the foot brake. Currently, I'm faster taking off from an upright position because I don't have to focus on re-uprighting the bike before letting out the clutch and twisting the throttle.
 

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I learned to balance a bike years ago One Foot Down riding my 79 Shovel with Foot Clutch. Balancing on one foot seemed impossible to me at first. I practiced and became very good at it and this has dramatically improved my overall riding skill on other bikes (especially low speed maneuvering).

I find the 2018 DCT very easy to balance compared to the F6B and Harleys I've ridden. Every time I come to a stop I practice coming to a stop and putting only my left foot down to maintain my balance skills. Straight ahead stops are no problem on the 2018 using rear brake only. If you are grabbing front brake, the bike can have a tendency to fall off to the left or right.

To develop balancing on one foot skills I did the following; Start in the Garage, engine off, bike upright, both feet on the ground, sidestand up. Put your right foot on the right peg and balance the bike on your left foot for as long as you can. Repeat the process with the other foot. Repeat this process for about 2 minutes every time before taking the bike out.

Once you start getting comfortable with balancing the bike on one foot in the garage, add this step to your practice. While balancing the bike on one foot slowly turn the handlebars full Left and then full Right. You will feel the weight of the bike shift slightly as the bars are turned. This exercise will further sharpen your sense of balance.
 

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I think some of you have no damn business on a GW. You better go get yourself a 250cc dirt bike and ride the **** outta it before you get on the street !!
I don't think your comments were addressed to me personally, but I will attempt to answer you truthfully:
Riding skill is one thing. Physical limitations, types of riding preferences, and motorcycle configurations are another.
I understand what you're saying about keeping up with riding skills. I think that's what everyone here is trying to accomplish.
Sorry Racer, but in a lot of groups I rode with, many thought Gold Wingers or dirt bike riders weren't "real" bikers.
Problem is: Some of us thought THEY weren't real motorcyclists, because they just approved of riding ONE kind of bike, in mostly city driving, to and from the next bar!
Look, I get your point - I think you meant well. It really is frustrating to see a lazy butt riding (or driving) like a fool. We're all friends here.
Yes, if I am forced to ride in the damned city, I use all of the recommended techniques - but I'm an old, broke-down, retired truck mechanic. I can't do cross-country tours 2 up anymore. I don't like city drivers, thinking they're "experts" trying their best to run me off the road. And yes, I get tired and sore at the end of a longer ride.
I can't stand tall, tipsy, crappy little dirt bikes. Just me. They are useless for touring, unbalanced, and way overpriced for what little you get. I like Harleys, but I know what a lot of GoldWingers think of them. My Heritage is way easier to stop and balance ALL DAY LONG. It's just not easier for me to ride, all day long! I have my F6B for that.
As a "graduate" of the Experienced Riders Course, I know proper technique. I've ridden and owned a hell of a lot of bikes, for a hell of lot of miles over the years. I think people are simply acknowledging old injuries and age catches up to all. I think discussing stopping skills and problems honestly, is a good thing! Cheers -
 

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Riding skill is one thing. Physical limitations, types of riding preferences, and motorcycle configurations are another.
This. I can't put both feet down on the Multistrada (other than on toes). It's one or the other. So I shift my butt and plant my left foot at each stop.
I want my muscle memory to be the same at every stop. I do NOT want to have a momentary mental lapse whether I'm on the MTS or GW, and end up dropping the bike because I used the wrong technique.

Also, there's lots of hills out here, I prefer to have my right foot on the brake, release clutch until it's slightly pulling against the brake, then release brake and proceed.
This is MY preference why I do left-foot-down at every stop. My preferences do not have to be your preferences.
 

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I don't think your comments were addressed to me personally, but I will attempt to answer you truthfully:
Riding skill is one thing. Physical limitations, types of riding preferences, and motorcycle configurations are another.
I understand what you're saying about keeping up with riding skills. I think that's what everyone here is trying to accomplish.
Sorry Racer, but in a lot of groups I rode with, many thought Gold Wingers or dirt bike riders weren't "real" bikers.
Problem is: Some of us thought THEY weren't real motorcyclists, because they just approved of riding ONE kind of bike, in mostly city driving, to and from the next bar!
Look, I get your point - I think you meant well. It really is frustrating to see a lazy butt riding (or driving) like a fool. We're all friends here.
Yes, if I am forced to ride in the damned city, I use all of the recommended techniques - but I'm an old, broke-down, retired truck mechanic. I can't do cross-country tours 2 up anymore. I don't like city drivers, thinking they're "experts" trying their best to run me off the road. And yes, I get tired and sore at the end of a longer ride.
I can't stand tall, tipsy, crappy little dirt bikes. Just me. They are useless for touring, unbalanced, and way overpriced for what little you get. I like Harleys, but I know what a lot of GoldWingers think of them. My Heritage is way easier to stop and balance ALL DAY LONG. It's just not easier for me to ride, all day long! I have my F6B for that.
As a "graduate" of the Experienced Riders Course, I know proper technique. I've ridden and owned a hell of a lot of bikes, for a hell of lot of miles over the years. I think people are simply acknowledging old injuries and age catches up to all. I think discussing stopping skills and problems honestly, is a good thing! Cheers -
Its was not directed towards you. The point of my post, is that people have no business starting out on a 900lb bike. Get a small bike like a dirt bike that you can learn all the required techniques of riding somewhere in the dirt where you can dump it and learn from your mistakes. I would trust an 16 yr old thats been riding for 2 years on an MX track more than I would a 50yr old that took a course on an parking lot going around cones. Don't get me wrong, courses are great, but there is a lot lacking. Like what to do when the rear kicks out etc. Stuff you can only learn through experience.
 

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I learned to balance a bike years ago One Foot Down riding my 79 Shovel with Foot Clutch. Balancing on one foot seemed impossible to me at first. I practiced and became very good at it and this has dramatically improved my overall riding skill on other bikes (especially low speed maneuvering).

I find the 2018 DCT very easy to balance compared to the F6B and Harleys I've ridden. Every time I come to a stop I practice coming to a stop and putting only my left foot down to maintain my balance skills. Straight ahead stops are no problem on the 2018 using rear brake only. If you are grabbing front brake, the bike can have a tendency to fall off to the left or right.

To develop balancing on one foot skills I did the following; Start in the Garage, engine off, bike upright, both feet on the ground, sidestand up. Put your right foot on the right peg and balance the bike on your left foot for as long as you can. Repeat the process with the other foot. Repeat this process for about 2 minutes every time before taking the bike out.

Once you start getting comfortable with balancing the bike on one foot in the garage, add this step to your practice. While balancing the bike on one foot slowly turn the handlebars full Left and then full Right. You will feel the weight of the bike shift slightly as the bars are turned. This exercise will further sharpen your sense of balance.
I also use one foot but I actually found it easier than two feet. It takes that last second wobble out of the process.

Could just be my 61 yr old body's muscle memory from my dirt bike riding days.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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This. I can't put both feet down on the Multistrada (other than on toes). It's one or the other. So I shift my butt and plant my left foot at each stop.
I want my muscle memory to be the same at every stop. I do NOT want to have a momentary mental lapse whether I'm on the MTS or GW, and end up dropping the bike because I used the wrong technique.

Also, there's lots of hills out here, I prefer to have my right foot on the brake, release clutch until it's slightly pulling against the brake, then release brake and proceed.
This is MY preference why I do left-foot-down at every stop. My preferences do not have to be your preferences.
I agree, a tall bike, or at a hill (or, whenever it feels appropriate), using the left foot down and holding the brake with the right, is the proper technique. If you're on the balls of your foot at every stop, then yes you should lean left and plant left foot. As you said, sometimes bike configuration becomes the dominant decision factor.
 

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Its was not directed towards you. The point of my post, is that people have no business starting out on a 900lb bike. Get a small bike like a dirt bike that you can learn all the required techniques of riding somewhere in the dirt where you can dump it and learn from your mistakes. I would trust an 16 yr old thats been riding for 2 years on an MX track more than I would a 50yr old that took a course on an parking lot going around cones. Don't get me wrong, courses are great, but there is a lot lacking. Like what to do when the rear kicks out etc. Stuff you can only learn through experience.
I can't disagree with anything you just stated.
 

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I would encourage all Gold Wing riders to at least consider taking the MSF Experienced Riders Course. When I took it, I was with my Gold Wing Group. We were told, it would specially geared towards Gold Wings. There was 2 days - one in class, and one on the asphalt with our bikes. As the instructor went around the room, asking about everyone's prior riding experience, nobody had less than 10 years on a bike.
I remember talking to my fellow Wingers about, "I'll be damned if he thinks I will drop a GoldWing, just to do any aggressive slaloms, or fancy maneuvers". We all agreed, assuming the stuff he taught dirt bikers or sport bike riders, would be different than what he taught us.
The day of the bike exercises, we all nervously gathered with our Goldwings.
This instructor shows up with a Yamaha Venture - the '90's one with the V-max engine and all plastic body. He gives us a demonstration of what we would do. We looked at each other, wide-eyed as we heard mufflers and scraping pegs on some of his more aggressive maneuvers. His point was clear - we had no excuse! He said we didn't have to ride as aggressively, but that police regularly did this course to improve their skills. It was challenging, but well taught.
At the end, we all passed. We all got together at our next meeting and everyone said how on their next rides after the class, they noticed a real improvement in ability and confidence. We all agreed it was well worth the cost and time.
If you have the opportunity, take the ERC. BTW - nobody dropped their wing!
 

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I have never had an issue stopping on my F6B or GW. I am not bragging, but I read this entire thread intrigued, wondering what I am doing right and do not even realize it. My technique is the same as Pilot Alan's ... front and rear brakes about 50/50 all the way down to about 15 mph, then just rear. Eyes up and over the top edge of the windshield the entire time (roof of car in front of me). The bike comes to a stop completely under control and I can even sit there on two wheels/no feet down for a few seconds or even all the way through the stop. I put my left foot down after all downshifting is complete. I keep the clutch in and right foot on the brake. Left foot back on the peg as I am letting the clutch out.

Many have mentioned eye position. I wonder if this is the most important factor in a clean stop. I know that whenever my eyes are not looking where I am going or want to go, stability is sacrificed, at any speed. Leg length may be a factor as well. I have a 33" inseam and legs are in good shape, so I have no problem holding up the GW with one leg, even if on an uneven or loose surface.
 

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I also use one foot but I actually found it easier than two feet. It takes that last second wobble out of the process.

Could just be my 61 yr old body's muscle memory from my dirt bike riding days.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
I too use one foot while stopping. I use both brakes to about 5 mph then just the rear and my left foot down. Once stopped I'll use both feet down.
 
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