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Last year marked one of the worst riding seasons in more than 10 years, with 42 motorcyclists killed on OPP-patrolled roads. Thirty-seven of the 42 fatal motorcycle crashes investigated by the OPP involved no other vehicles.

Interesting stat but not entirely surprising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well there's been about half a dozen to a dozen or so decent riding days in Ontario this year ( I'm in the most southern point) and there's been 4 fatalities already. Not a good trend but on my two rides this year I saw some stupid activities taking place by folks on two wheels.
 

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Lumping motorcycles in one category is useless data. I'd be interested in seeing age group and model/type to provide some further clarity.
That's easy...Rockets - speed and H.D. riders - drinking, New riders and old riders...
 

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Last year marked one of the worst riding seasons in more than 10 years, with 42 motorcyclists killed on OPP-patrolled roads. Thirty-seven of the 42 fatal motorcycle crashes investigated by the OPP involved no other vehicles.

Interesting stat but not entirely surprising.
Are you familiar with the "Hurt Report"? It was published in 1981. Yes, it's an old motorcycle crash causation report and the numbers have changed. However, I believe the findings remain relevant today. Yes, I'm aware there have been other reports. The actual report is quite lengthy but here's a link to the overall findings and is a fairly quick read. List of findings in the Hurt Report - Wikipedia
 

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Last year marked one of the worst riding seasons in more than 10 years, with 42 motorcyclists killed on OPP-patrolled roads. Thirty-seven of the 42 fatal motorcycle crashes investigated by the OPP involved no other vehicles.

Interesting stat but not entirely surprising.
This year we are all going to have to be careful. I ride year round but some don't and riding is a skill that can get rusty pretty quick. Your brain thinks you are still as "good" as you were last year, whatever that skill level actually was.
 

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I have had a couple of near misses in the last 2 years. One was my fault, one was not.
The one that was my fault was that I was going up on the inside of a van waiting to turn left. The reason he was waiting was because a car was coming towards him from the opposite direction and was going to turn left in front of him.
I could not see that car.

Luckily I missed the car that turned into a side street in front of me. Stupid move on my part, no excuse, a bad decision at the end of a long days ride. The other near miss was a guy on a riding lawnmower that suddenly appeared from behind a parked vehicle. He went straight across the road without looking for traffic. I barely missed him with the back brake locked up and he just went on his way like nothing happened. I caught up with him and gave him heck and he couldn't have care less.
 

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Lumping motorcycles in one category is useless data. I'd be interested in seeing age group and model/type to provide some further clarity.
Sort of. MCs definitely less safe as an entire category.
But to your point, it seems I'm forever educating those who are scared to death of MCs about the influence of alcohol, lack of a MC endorsement, and the experience factor in who actually is most likely to crash, and be killed.
It never matters...they just believe what they want, you know?
 

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The other near miss was a guy on a riding lawnmower that suddenly appeared from behind a parked vehicle. He went straight across the road without looking for traffic. I barely missed him with the back brake locked up and he just went on his way like nothing happened. I caught up with him and gave him heck and he couldn't have care less.
Was he working on lawns or was he a repeat offender who lost his license but used a mower to get around? If the former, he's just a jerk. If the latter, that is why he couldn't care less.
 

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That's easy...Rockets - speed and H.D. riders - drinking, New riders and old riders...
About summs it up. The additional group that I would include are the folks that slam on the rear foot brake solely leaving 50+ ft of rear wheel skid when a car turns left in front of them, excluding their 90% of the braking efficiency tool called the front brake. Very few practice emergency braking, and it truly can save your life.
 

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I know a guy who was a BIG BOY, riding a Fat Boy...somewhere he heard or believed if he used the front brake the bike would flip over. I tried to convince him that was wrong. I even grabbed my front brake showing him...No not me. At the end of his warranty period he took his bike to H.D. for a check up. They had to replace the front brake system because he NEVER touched them! Fact!
 

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I know a guy who was a BIG BOY, riding a Fat Boy...somewhere he heard or believed if he used the front brake the bike would flip over. I tried to convince him that was wrong. I even grabbed my front brake showing him...No not me. At the end of his warranty period he took his bike to H.D. for a check up. They had to replace the front brake system because he NEVER touched them! Fact!
:oops: I worked many motorcycle crashes where the rear wheel skid led the rider directly to the cars passenger side B Pillar at 90 degrees...just a portion of front braking would have prevented them all.
 

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About summs it up. The additional group that I would include are the folks that slam on the rear foot brake solely leaving 50+ ft of rear wheel skid when a car turns left in front of them, excluding their 90% of the braking efficiency tool called the front brake. Very few practice emergency braking, and it truly can save your life.
Back to the Fat Boy, once it had just stopped raining and I suggested locking up the front brake to see how the bike would react in a panic stop on wet roads. He had a fit saying now way would he use the front brake in the rain or practice. I locked up the front tire and just laughed !!!
 

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Get this. Last week an elderly women (maybe upper 80's) walked out in an intersection right in front of me. She did not even look. Hit the brakes hard and barely missed taking her out like a bowling pin. Scared the *&#$ out of me. I think the ABS works. I'm still shaking thinking about it.
 

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I was an MSF instructor for about 10 years, and I've always believed that the basic rider's course saved untold lives by getting the rider to know the basics of safe riding, basics that the self trained rider would probably learn on his own after about six months, or one full season of riding. But during that first season was when he was most likely to get himself hurt or killed just based on his lack of skill and experience. And despite filling every class roster that we could offer, I know that we only trained a small portion of those who bought a motorcycle for the first time, with most folks getting a quick lesson in their driveway from a friend or relative, or from the salesman at the place that they bought the bike, and then heading out onto public roads.

Maybe a factor nowadays is that bikes are bigger and faster than many years ago. There was a time that a 600cc motorcycle was considered a big bike. In fact, back in the mid 1960's when I first thought about motorcycling, a 450 was a BIG bike. Bikes that did not go as fast might have been safer than the bikes of today. Offsetting that might be that today's bikes have much, much better brakes than the old drum brakes of the old days. But it does seem that you can get into a lot more trouble now with a "starter" bike that has a 750cc engine and can do 0-60 in four seconds than the old 175cc Kawasaki that probably did 0-60 in about 10 seconds.

I will add that in my approaching 40 years of riding I have only had one crash, and that was totally by myself, seemingly due to a mechanical failure, not another vehicle, alcohol or lack of skill in a demanding situation. Close calls? Many over the years, but not so many as to make me give up on riding.
 

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I was an MSF instructor for about 10 years, and I've always believed that the basic rider's course saved untold lives by getting the rider to know the basics of safe riding, basics that the self trained rider would probably learn on his own after about six months, or one full season of riding. But during that first season was when he was most likely to get himself hurt or killed just based on his lack of skill and experience. And despite filling every class roster that we could offer, I know that we only trained a small portion of those who bought a motorcycle for the first time, with most folks getting a quick lesson in their driveway from a friend or relative, or from the salesman at the place that they bought the bike, and then heading out onto public roads.

Maybe a factor nowadays is that bikes are bigger and faster than many years ago. There was a time that a 600cc motorcycle was considered a big bike. In fact, back in the mid 1960's when I first thought about motorcycling, a 450 was a BIG bike. Bikes that did not go as fast might have been safer than the bikes of today. Offsetting that might be that today's bikes have much, much better brakes than the old drum brakes of the old days. But it does seem that you can get into a lot more trouble now with a "starter" bike that has a 750cc engine and can do 0-60 in four seconds than the old 175cc Kawasaki that probably did 0-60 in about 10 seconds.

I will add that in my approaching 40 years of riding I have only had one crash, and that was totally by myself, seemingly due to a mechanical failure, not another vehicle, alcohol or lack of skill in a demanding situation. Close calls? Many over the years, but not so many as to make me give up on riding.
Thank you for your service in both ways, but specifically as an MSF instructor. I took a class before I got my license and its the best thing I could have done for myself. The knowledge and practical slow speed handling was key to still being around today. It also made me a more (and better) defensive driver.
 
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