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A reminder to 'be careful out there' is not a bad thing.

Never 'assume' that there is nothing in that area or other lane that is hidden by another vehicle, around a blind curve or over the crest of a hill.
The consequences of being wrong can be just too severe.
 

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Let us not forget when looking at motorcycle deaths, not much protection as compared to a car, heavy car, light motorcycle. Any significant car/motorcycle collision and the m/c driver pretty much bought the farm.
 

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2018 Honda Gold Wing
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Most riders I come across can ride really fast on straight roads...but they can't go around a corner without slowing way down..they never practice going around a corner at max lean angle so they know how the bike feels if it touches down in a tighter corner so they wont be startled when a floorboard or something scrapes and makes noise and then let the bike straighten up in that split second and run off the road.
Ive known 3 riders over the years who lost their life because they rode faster than their skill level and crashed in a curve.
 

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2018 AirBag
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Funny thing about riding with others or being seen by others...If they're going faster than you are their an idiot, if they're going slower than you are you're an idiot. My fave, ride your own ride...then later at the lunch or dinner table there is talk about the fast group and the slow group. How many have been pressured into wrecking?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Funny thing about riding with others or being seen by others...If they're going faster than you are their an idiot, if they're going slower than you are you're an idiot. My fave, ride your own ride...then later at the lunch or dinner table there is talk about the fast group and the slow group. How many have been pressured into wrecking?
Always wondered if the CB group ride added some unnecessary stress to the riders. Never missed the CB on my bike.
 

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Funny thing about riding with others or being seen by others...If they're going faster than you are their an idiot, if they're going slower than you are you're an idiot. My fave, ride your own ride...then later at the lunch or dinner table there is talk about the fast group and the slow group. How many have been pressured into wrecking?
I have seen/experienced that as well, and know of one such fatality on the Blue Ridge Parkway a few years ago. Less skilled rider trying to keep pace with a very skilled hotshot who would brag about running 70-80 mph on the BRP. Less skilled rider ran off the road into a tree, and that was it. Suddenly it wasn’t such fun anymore....

As a footnote to that, the skilled rider sold his pride and joy and quit riding last year.
 

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Lots of riders get pressured to ride faster than their skills...Ive seen it the Blue Ridge..mostly cruiser riders...I come up on them and instead of moving to the right and letting me past to enjoy my ride they speed up and make mistakes in the corners showing they are over their head...usually by the third corner they move to the right and let you pass...myself I always move to the right and let the lighter faster bikes enjoy their ride.
 

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I just took the GWRRA Advance Rider course yesterday. I've been riding on/off for the past 50 years, on a variety of cruisers and one sport bike. This is my first Wing and I took the course thinking a "refresher" never hurts and I wanted to learn more about this specific motorcycle. I really wasn't expecting to learn anything I wasn't already aware of.

Before I took the course I considered myself a skilled (whatever that means) rider. I've had more than a few close calls in those fifty years and managed to make it home without a bad outcome. I "must" be skilled because I'm a survivor, I've survived the long haul. An honest rider will admit they've had experiences that they survived as much by luck as skill. Think encountering the unexpected, riding when tired, riding after dark at higher than sensible speeds, riding too fast on blind curves for the thrill and the occasional wildlife encounters, to name just a few.

I was quickly humbled yesterday. I quickly learned I'm not the skilled rider I thought I was. I learned a great deal about the Wing and I learned what I clearly need to work on. No, I didn't drop my Wing but I was more challenged on the obstacle course than I thought I would/should be. I also learned that the Wing can be dropped (no, not me) at slow speed without getting damaged (Hat Tip to Mother Honda-that's pretty impressive).

I'll spend some time pondering 'what happened?' yesterday. I thought I was better. Maybe I used to be. I'm also older than I used to be, weaker, with slower reaction times, less stamina and possibly less attentive or more easily distracted.

We've all heard the technical terms. Counter steering. Trail braking and the like. Not everyone will admit that they don't really understand them or how to correctly employ them.

I can't explain it and yet I cannot deny it. The bike (ANY bike) will go where you are looking. If you aren't looking where you need to be, your trajectory WILL be off. Do that on a curve at speed and things can quickly get ugly. If something distracts you while tucked in that curve, you may have no time or opportunity to correct.

so, was the dead rider less skilled or dumber than the one who was quicker and arrived alive ? what difference does it make? Dead is dead. If you are the rooster who thinks he's smarter or better, think again.

I know conversations or printed articles about safety can be dry and boring. And how many actually go out and practice those skills? I for one haven't done so as much as I should. Then there is the variable of the bike. How well do you really know your machine? (I've only got 5,000 Wing miles under my belt and I learn something most every time I take it out). You may have been a hotshot in your thirties on that shiny crotch rocket so you must be a legend on your Wing. Or maybe you have multiple bikes in your stable (I do), each with unique handling/riding characteristics that require different riding techniques (think panic stops). A lot of things to consider. And nothing to take for granted.

I didn't come here to preach, but to confess. I'm a legend in my own mind and thought I should have aced that obstacle course yesterday. didn't come close to doing that. I guess I could sell my bikes and wait to die in my recliner but I think I'll try working on my skill set some and see if that helps. The recliner isn't going anywhere. Till then, I have a couple rules I don't violate.

NO alcohol when on two wheels. NO exceptions. you may be a better man than me. good for you.
unless unavoidable, I don't ride after dark. the risks outweigh the benefits
THINK wildlife if riding at dawn or dusk. Someday I'll tell you about the three snarling rotweillers that charged me without any warning. I think I peed a little that time.
Make no assumptions. Scan in front and behind and then confirm.
I wish I could say I adhere to ATGATT. I do on the 'busa, not on the Wing. I need to rethink this.
I'm more aware of posted speed limits (I didn't say I don't exceed them). some may say I went and got old. I'd like to get older.

I had my eyes opened yesterday. if you haven't considered taking a skills or safety course, you might be surprised like I was if you opt for one.
 

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I just took the GWRRA Advance Rider course yesterday. I've been riding on/off for the past 50 years, on a variety of cruisers and one sport bike. This is my first Wing and I took the course thinking a "refresher" never hurts and I wanted to learn more about this specific motorcycle. I really wasn't expecting to learn anything I wasn't already aware of.

Before I took the course I considered myself a skilled (whatever that means) rider. I've had more than a few close calls in those fifty years and managed to make it home without a bad outcome. I "must" be skilled because I'm a survivor, I've survived the long haul. An honest rider will admit they've had experiences that they survived as much by luck as skill. Think encountering the unexpected, riding when tired, riding after dark at higher than sensible speeds, riding too fast on blind curves for the thrill and the occasional wildlife encounters, to name just a few.

I was quickly humbled yesterday. I quickly learned I'm not the skilled rider I thought I was. I learned a great deal about the Wing and I learned what I clearly need to work on. No, I didn't drop my Wing but I was more challenged on the obstacle course than I thought I would/should be. I also learned that the Wing can be dropped (no, not me) at slow speed without getting damaged (Hat Tip to Mother Honda-that's pretty impressive).

I'll spend some time pondering 'what happened?' yesterday. I thought I was better. Maybe I used to be. I'm also older than I used to be, weaker, with slower reaction times, less stamina and possibly less attentive or more easily distracted.

We've all heard the technical terms. Counter steering. Trail braking and the like. Not everyone will admit that they don't really understand them or how to correctly employ them.

I can't explain it and yet I cannot deny it. The bike (ANY bike) will go where you are looking. If you aren't looking where you need to be, your trajectory WILL be off. Do that on a curve at speed and things can quickly get ugly. If something distracts you while tucked in that curve, you may have no time or opportunity to correct.

so, was the dead rider less skilled or dumber than the one who was quicker and arrived alive ? what difference does it make? Dead is dead. If you are the rooster who thinks he's smarter or better, think again.

I know conversations or printed articles about safety can be dry and boring. And how many actually go out and practice those skills? I for one haven't done so as much as I should. Then there is the variable of the bike. How well do you really know your machine? (I've only got 5,000 Wing miles under my belt and I learn something most every time I take it out). You may have been a hotshot in your thirties on that shiny crotch rocket so you must be a legend on your Wing. Or maybe you have multiple bikes in your stable (I do), each with unique handling/riding characteristics that require different riding techniques (think panic stops). A lot of things to consider. And nothing to take for granted.

I didn't come here to preach, but to confess. I'm a legend in my own mind and thought I should have aced that obstacle course yesterday. didn't come close to doing that. I guess I could sell my bikes and wait to die in my recliner but I think I'll try working on my skill set some and see if that helps. The recliner isn't going anywhere. Till then, I have a couple rules I don't violate.

NO alcohol when on two wheels. NO exceptions. you may be a better man than me. good for you.
unless unavoidable, I don't ride after dark. the risks outweigh the benefits
THINK wildlife if riding at dawn or dusk. Someday I'll tell you about the three snarling rotweillers that charged me without any warning. I think I peed a little that time.
Make no assumptions. Scan in front and behind and then confirm.
I wish I could say I adhere to ATGATT. I do on the 'busa, not on the Wing. I need to rethink this.
I'm more aware of posted speed limits (I didn't say I don't exceed them). some may say I went and got old. I'd like to get older.

I had my eyes opened yesterday. if you haven't considered taking a skills or safety course, you might be surprised like I was if you opt for one.
You might find the M.C. Rider post from last Friday interesting. Parts of your story sound like a guy he had. Part of your story sound like me! Thank you.
p.s. "I'd like to get older" sound like words to live by. ;) Grandkids, retirement, SCUBA...LOTs of other things more important than a fast ride through a corner.
 

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My daughter just bought a GL1100 from the next door neighbor, she has never ridden anything bigger than a 125. She is taking the basic two day training course in our state next month. We are completely going through the bike and servicing all the brakes, shocks and tires to make sure they are 100%.
We live in a rural area so a lot of wide open spaces to learn on. I have a complete set of cones for us both to practice on a closed course before hitting the road. I definitely have concerns having my daughter riding but we are going to do everything we can to make sure she is as prepared as possible.

Thanks for this post, it's good to evaluate our riding skills and the risks we take to enjoying this great pastime.
Happy trails!
 

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I just took the GWRRA Advance Rider course yesterday. I've been riding on/off for the past 50 years, on a variety of cruisers and one sport bike. This is my first Wing and I took the course thinking a "refresher" never hurts and I wanted to learn more about this specific motorcycle. I really wasn't expecting to learn anything I wasn't already aware of.

Before I took the course I considered myself a skilled (whatever that means) rider. I've had more than a few close calls in those fifty years and managed to make it home without a bad outcome. I "must" be skilled because I'm a survivor, I've survived the long haul. An honest rider will admit they've had experiences that they survived as much by luck as skill. Think encountering the unexpected, riding when tired, riding after dark at higher than sensible speeds, riding too fast on blind curves for the thrill and the occasional wildlife encounters, to name just a few.

I was quickly humbled yesterday. I quickly learned I'm not the skilled rider I thought I was. I learned a great deal about the Wing and I learned what I clearly need to work on. No, I didn't drop my Wing but I was more challenged on the obstacle course than I thought I would/should be. I also learned that the Wing can be dropped (no, not me) at slow speed without getting damaged (Hat Tip to Mother Honda-that's pretty impressive).

I'll spend some time pondering 'what happened?' yesterday. I thought I was better. Maybe I used to be. I'm also older than I used to be, weaker, with slower reaction times, less stamina and possibly less attentive or more easily distracted.

We've all heard the technical terms. Counter steering. Trail braking and the like. Not everyone will admit that they don't really understand them or how to correctly employ them.

I can't explain it and yet I cannot deny it. The bike (ANY bike) will go where you are looking. If you aren't looking where you need to be, your trajectory WILL be off. Do that on a curve at speed and things can quickly get ugly. If something distracts you while tucked in that curve, you may have no time or opportunity to correct.

so, was the dead rider less skilled or dumber than the one who was quicker and arrived alive ? what difference does it make? Dead is dead. If you are the rooster who thinks he's smarter or better, think again.

I know conversations or printed articles about safety can be dry and boring. And how many actually go out and practice those skills? I for one haven't done so as much as I should. Then there is the variable of the bike. How well do you really know your machine? (I've only got 5,000 Wing miles under my belt and I learn something most every time I take it out). You may have been a hotshot in your thirties on that shiny crotch rocket so you must be a legend on your Wing. Or maybe you have multiple bikes in your stable (I do), each with unique handling/riding characteristics that require different riding techniques (think panic stops). A lot of things to consider. And nothing to take for granted.

I didn't come here to preach, but to confess. I'm a legend in my own mind and thought I should have aced that obstacle course yesterday. didn't come close to doing that. I guess I could sell my bikes and wait to die in my recliner but I think I'll try working on my skill set some and see if that helps. The recliner isn't going anywhere. Till then, I have a couple rules I don't violate.

NO alcohol when on two wheels. NO exceptions. you may be a better man than me. good for you.
unless unavoidable, I don't ride after dark. the risks outweigh the benefits
THINK wildlife if riding at dawn or dusk. Someday I'll tell you about the three snarling rotweillers that charged me without any warning. I think I peed a little that time.
Make no assumptions. Scan in front and behind and then confirm.
I wish I could say I adhere to ATGATT. I do on the 'busa, not on the Wing. I need to rethink this.
I'm more aware of posted speed limits (I didn't say I don't exceed them). some may say I went and got old. I'd like to get older.

I had my eyes opened yesterday. if you haven't considered taking a skills or safety course, you might be surprised like I was if you opt for one.
Where does one find more information on a riding program? I went looking for the riding program and their site was confusing.
 

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Google "motorcycle riding safety course <your state>."
 

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Get this. Last week an elderly women (maybe upper 80's) walked out in an intersection right in front of me. She did not even look. Hit the brakes hard and barely missed taking her out like a bowling pin. Scared the *&#$ out of me. I think the ABS works. I'm still shaking thinking about it.
Sorry it happened, but I do like the bowling pin part.
 

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Was he working on lawns or was he a repeat offender who lost his license but used a mower to get around? If the former, he's just a jerk. If the latter, that is why he couldn't care less.
I arrested a guy for DUI on a lawn mower!
 
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