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Discussion Starter #1
I was trying to put an insert into one of the holes that was stripped in the valvecover area, where the chrome strip attaches, and seating the insert also broke thru the aluminum. So now I have a repair to do, luckily I got all the parts out of the inside, so shouldn't have any grinding noises. I am wondering what type of epoxy/sealant to use for this repair. I have the 2 broken pieces from the original hole, so my plan was to put a piece of something on the inside of the whole all the way around so I would have a backing to attach the 2 broken pieces I retrieved. So I have access to some steel for the backing, unless it is recommended I use aluminum, which I can purchase a strip at HD if needed. He suggestions would be appreciated.
Thank you
Mike
 

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Back in 81 I bought a 1976 Honda 750K that had a broken case at the drive sprocket from the chain that had broke. I had purchased this two part type of aluminum epoxy putty that I was able to mold, machine, drill and tap. I can’t remember the name of this stuff but it was pretty awesome and never had any issues with it.
 

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I was trying to put an insert into one of the holes that was stripped in the valvecover area, where the chrome strip attaches, and seating the insert also broke thru the aluminum. So now I have a repair to do, luckily I got all the parts out of the inside, so shouldn't have any grinding noises. I am wondering what type of epoxy/sealant to use for this repair. I have the 2 broken pieces from the original hole, so my plan was to put a piece of something on the inside of the whole all the way around so I would have a backing to attach the 2 broken pieces I retrieved. So I have access to some steel for the backing, unless it is recommended I use aluminum, which I can purchase a strip at HD if needed. He suggestions would be appreciated.
Thank you
Mike
I'm not understanding what you are trying to fix. Can you post a picture ???
 

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I would not use steel, dissimilar metals will cause galvanic corrosion.

I've had good luck repairing aluminum boats with AlumiWeld, that might be an option here.
 

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I'd just buy a new cylinder head cover and replace it. They are only about $300. You'll spend a lot of time trying to fix it and always be worried if it held or leaked. A new one is worth the peace of mind.
 

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devcon makes an aluminum epoxy:

JB weld makes a Marine Epoxy:

if you proficient in soldering/welding there are "magic" aluminum welding rods...but the material needing repair would have to be super clean:

hope this helps...btw I have used Devcon products with good results for decades
 

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If it is just the cover, I would order a new one and patch the damaged one for current riding. Just this morning I used two J.B. Weld products to repair an equipment joystick that is a heavy clam shell hand hold with several multi-function switches within. I cleaned the porus cracked fracture lines with detergent an water, then ethel alcohol. I then carefully worked J.B. weld into the porus fracture lines and assembled the clam shell. Once the expoxy glue reached initial cure stage I used J.B. Weld "Steel Stick", a firm putty blended with gloved hands. Sanded the outer area of that clam shell with 100grade paper and then applied a thick layer of the putty. The putty heats-up in a few minutes and takes a hard initial set in about 5 to 10 minutes. Very strong, rated to way hotter than you will need and also to high pressure. Got mine at Lowes. The part I saved is $370.00 plus shipping and would not be here until late next week. That equipment is on the job NOW in perfect working order. You could form a patch in your gloved hand, press it gently into/onto the hole as a slightly thicker patch then needed. Then use coarse sand paper to finish within an hour. You could even fake in the bolster (boss) for the screw hole to be drilled and tapped after a day. That way your can ride now and order parts after holiday weekend.

prs
 

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You can do 1 of 2 things. First, since the hole is covered by the lower cover, and all that really needs done is to ensure that the hole does not get worst, I would use a Dremal, or file, to smooth out the rough edges and let it go at that.

Or replace the cover with either a good used one of eBay, or with a new one.

Whatever route you choose, be sure to remove it and inspect the underside. You might be surprised at what you see. Once off, be sure to inspect what is under the cover such as the cam and cam cover.

Using a glue, or epoxy is not a good choice.
 

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There is a cover like this in my used spare parts bin... shoot me a PM if you’re interested. Mines not made of gold, like the new ones!
 

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The hole location is in the valve cover itself which is sealed to keep oil from leaking out. The lower decorative cover is not sealed. If you do not seal the hole, you'll have a massive oil leak. If this were my bike, I'd just replace the whole cover.

369459
 

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Discussion Starter #13
There is a part of me that agrees with you about replacing the cover. I probably would have done that, but I can't believe how long it takes to get OEM Honda parts. Last year you sent a message that you thought my problem may have been plugs and spark plug wire for my poor idling/running 2006 GL1800 7A Goldwing. I was thinking about that after you messages me, and decided that I should probably order some spark plug wires for my bike, since it might take a while to get them. A honda rep guy I talked to about getting parts timely, suggested a place in NC that he thought would take care of me.
It took 4 MONTHS to get all 6 or my spark plug wires. They don't come in a set, they are individual. I finally got the last wire to make my set complete in Dec 2019, original order August something 2019.
I still have the wires and have thought about putting them on, but it seems that you have to go a couple of steps past the "belly of the beast" to install them. So I may put them on someday.
Going back to cover, I am thinking I would possible waste a lot of good riding weather, we don't have her in Michigan anyway, waiting for this cover to come, so I decided to try and do a fix and see if this would work, and as a matter of fact I just got back from a test ride of my fix, and everything is clean and dry under the cover and the area around it.
It seems funny that those 2 holes in the bottom of the top cover are dead holes or whatever they are called and hold nothing except the chrome bolts that are make to look like they hold the chrome wraparound cover, but those bolts do not hold my chrome cover, the cover has 2 sided tape holding it to the other cover.
I apologize for being so long winded, I may change this cover out during......................
MMM "Michigan Maintenance Months" , but if it doesn't leak, I probably won't and spend the 282 dollars on something else
Thank you,
Mike
 

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I'm not sure why you take so long to get parts but I live in Texas and order OEM from Ronnies GW Mail Order Parts and get them within a week.
 

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Ditto on the use of JB-WELD, it’s amazing stuff. Also the other adhesive products. Just clean the parts meticulously first. Remember, nearly all of the airliners flying today are glued together....
 

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They don't come in a set, they are individual. I finally got the last wire to make my set complete in Dec 2019, original order August something 2019.
Honda had a back order on spark plug wires last year, lots of folks were having a hard time getting them, it wasn't just you. Normally parts won't take that long to get.
 

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You can do 1 of 2 things. First, since the hole is covered by the lower cover, and all that really needs done is to ensure that the hole does not get worst, I would use a Dremal, or file, to smooth out the rough edges and let it go at that.

Or replace the cover with either a good used one of eBay, or with a new one.

Whatever route you choose, be sure to remove it and inspect the underside. You might be surprised at what you see. Once off, be sure to inspect what is under the cover such as the cam and cam cover.

Using a glue, or epoxy is not a good choice.
Sorry ... let me retract what I said. I looked at your picture too fast. The cover your're showing holds in oil. In fact the lower part of that cover is there to drain oil back into the sump area. It must be replaced. No matter what the package of glue says, putty, or epoxy, all of that will be a waist of time. Such stuff will never expand and contract at the same rate the aluminum valve cover does. The cover must be replaced. Again, be sure to inspect the cam-cover under the valve cover.

If this repair were in my shop, and since I stand behind my work, I'd also order in a new valve cover gasket, and 5 of #25 in the fishe below. Be sure to silicone the area as shown in a Service Manual. Black RTV will work just fine. When you unbolt the cover, pay attention to how the cover bolts unscrew looking for ones that maybe bent.

369486
 
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