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Any spark plug gurus out there who can look at these plugs and comment about my overall engine condition? The plugs are likely OEM with 24,000 on them. I changed them out b/c the manual said to; I wasn't having any obvious performance issues but who knows, maybe now I will realize how much better it should've been!
 

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2nd last pic show why I change 'em.

Electrode has eroded away leaving the 'curved' area near end.
Sharp edge seen on post of a new plug has been eroded to a rounded edge.


And, as cheap as plugs are, after taking them out to check, I'm not putting old ones back in.



FWIW, Honda suggests changing every 16,000 miles, or every other oil change.
 

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What is the gap setting on the photoed ones?
I don't know what they'd been set at when new but likely 1.0-1.10 mm, per factory specs. If you mean what are they as shown, I didn't measure them--just tossed 'em away.
 

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Any spark plug gurus out there who can look at these plugs and comment about my overall engine condition?
To me they look like they are all burning equal, and way past needing replaced.
 

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These engines tend to run cold and your plugs have been a bit cool, but that is the nature of this beast and I would stay with standard range plugs. Maybe twist that grip further and more often to help reduce head carbon -- then again head carbon has been reported to be common to the beast.

prs
 
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They look just fine for the mileage.
:nerd:
See the attached Spark Plug Post Mortem pictures.
Someone needs to tell Mr/Mrs google that most of those pictures do not, and never will apply to a GL1800.
 

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Why is that? Because an oil fouled plug on a Goldwing looks different that a oil fouled plug in other vehicles.
 

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Someone needs to tell Mr/Mrs google that most of those pictures do not, and never will apply to a GL1800.
FWIW, I didn't get them from either Mr. or Ms. Google. I've had them in hard copy, since long before Google was around. While they're not from Bosch, NGK or Denso, the hard copies I have, come directly from Champion Spark Plug and AC Spark Plug. But hey, what do they know?
 

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But hey, what do they know?
Those pictures are from a time long-long ago. I know this is hard to believe, but for decades, the internal combustion engine didn't have fuel injection and computer controlled spark and timing. Thus, many no longer apply, and unfortunately current pictures don't seem to exist.
 

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unfortunately current pictures don't seem to exist.
. . . . and that would be . . . . . let me guess . . . . . because dead Spark Plugs still die from the same causes and for some reasons their corpses still look the same?

LOL . . . Good Grief! Give me a break!

The technology on the Honda Goldwing such as: Speed/Density Fuel Injection (1968) with Three Way Catalytic Converters and O2 Sensors (1976) have been around on production vehicles for a long, long, long time as has the Electronic Ignition System (1972). Just because one is enamored with the Honda Goldwing doesn't make it special mechanically, electronically or chemically. In fact, in many ways, it's actually a bit dated compared to the current ICE competition.
 

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. . . . and that would be . . . . . let me guess . . . . . because dead Spark Plugs still die from the same causes and for some reasons their corpses still look the same?

LOL . . . Good Grief! Give me a break!

The technology on the Honda Goldwing such as: Speed/Density Fuel Injection (1968) with Three Way Catalytic Converters and O2 Sensors (1976) have been around on production vehicles for a long, long, long time as has the Electronic Ignition System (1972). Just because one is enamored with the Honda Goldwing doesn't make it special mechanically, electronically or chemically. In fact, in many ways, it's actually a bit dated compared to the current ICE competition.
Man ... you must be pulling a massive amount of 5th gen spark plugs. Please share pictures of 5th gen plugs that look like the ones in the chart.
 

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1. Look for black specks on the porcelain insulator under the center electrode. This would be evidence of pinging or detonation.

2. Look at the arm of the ground electrode and note where the color change on it occurs. The further out toward the end of the electrode, the hotter the engine is running (indicating lean). If the arm is discolored all the way to the end, that cylinder may be running extremely hot.

3. Inspect the insulator for any signs of blistering. Blistering would indicate a dangerously lean mixture. A normal tan/yellow coloration should be observed on at least one point on the insulator where it faces the intake valve. This would indicate a correct mixture and burn rate.

4. Inspect carbon build up at the end of the plug threads where it is exposed to the cylinder. Some carbon should be found there, but it should not be caked up or wet.

The fuel injection system of the Wing does a very good job of keeping the mixture correct, so the plugs in this bike normally look good when pulled, so most of the time you don't have to worry about it. As long as you don't have a mouse nest in the airbox, or a bad sensor you should be ok. This bike does exhibit some pinging in lower gears under load, so you may see some black specks on the insulator, but unless you find it really heavily speckled, don't worry about it. If you're worried about pinging, just go up one octane grade in gas.

I've pulled plugs from literally hundreds of GL1800's and I've not seen any that were a cause for alarm. But I do recommend regularly replacing them because the electrodes will round off and they will go out of gap. Worn plugs will make the secondary electrical system work harder which stresses the coils and plug wires, and it will make the bike harder to start which puts added strain on the battery and starter, and it can also cause a slight drop in gas mileage. As cheap as plugs are, if you have removed them, you should just go ahead and replace them.
 
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