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I think i'm going to install them first, then go back and flush the system. The rear upper caliper doesn't look there is a lot of room to get in and out. Any suggestions? The others look easy, I have there bag and hose. plenty of fluid and towels and rags. Thanks in advance!
 

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Not worth the money. Many members have problems with them.
 

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It'll fit. Things to be aware of. Clutch bleeder doesn't actually need to be swapped out as it will gravity drain. I swapped mine out while I was there.

The speed bleeders have locktite on them. It's easy to not get them fully seated, or, to overtighten them and snap them. So, when installing the new bleeder, tighten it down, then back off a turn or so, then try reseating again. Take note of its position vs the previous setting, that will determine if you need to repeat.

Ensure you put plenty of towels over the plastic, brake fluid is toxic to the plastic. Minimize time the bleeder is removed to prevent air bubbles getting into the system.

You'll know when you've flushed out the old, fluid color will change to clear going into the collection bag.

Follow the manual for the sequence for bleeding, and don't let the reservoir go empty.
 

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Also, when done make sure you apply full pressure to the brakes to check for leaks.
 
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Not worth the money. Many members have problems with them.
I have never seen a post on here or heard from anyone that had problems with Speed bleeders. They make the annual job of bleeding brakes and clutch a 1 person project rather than a 2 person project.
Would you care to elaborate on your claims?


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I have never seen a post on here or heard from anyone that had problems with Speed bleeders. They make the annual job of bleeding brakes and clutch a 1 person project rather than a 2 person project.
Would you care to elaborate on your claims?


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Stay tuned ... on many Speed Bleeder thread someone usually comes along and post why they don't like them. You can also do an advance search.
 

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I have to say I read the posts about speedbleeders when they pop up. I would say the posts are over 90% positive. I can only remember reading 2 negative posts over the years. I installed them in the order that you are supposed to bleed. Then bled each one right after I installed them. Took about 45 minutes. The next time I bled all 7 in about 30 minutes.
 

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I installed them the last time I needed to flush the system, they worked great, made the process very easy and quick, that was probably about a year ago, no issues, I am keeping them.
 
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I have them and I like them. I use them on my Goldwing and the Harley. No issues what-so-ever. Highly recommended. Essentially it's just a regular Brake Bleeder with a one way check valve and some thread sealant. Worst case scenario . . . they work exactly the same as the original Brake Bleeders. If you're cranking down on them so hard they break . . . you'd have snapped the originals as well.

Do bear in mind that each Brake Caliper has two Brake Bleeders. To convert the bike, which has three Calipers (Two Front and one Rear) you'll need six of them.
 

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I recently flushed my brakes and clutch. I was going to install speed bleeders when I came across this gadget.
Worked great.

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That looks like a handy gadget to have in the tool box.
 

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just installed them on my bike. Took longer to install than to bleed. Getting to the clutch nipple was the hardest. had to remove the evap cannister or whatever its called.
Yup, that one is a royal pain in the behind,I did not like doing that one either, but it is done.
 

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I have always bled brakes the old fashioned way until last fall. I installed speed bleaders on my 17 wing, for my first time experience with the product. All I can say is, wow! Why haven't I done this before now? My wing's brakes and clutch have a better feel than even when it was new. Wlth the speed bleeder's, this chore was easier and more thorough than ever before. For now, I'm a new convert to the speed bleeder club.
 

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It'll fit. Things to be aware of. Clutch bleeder doesn't actually need to be swapped out as it will gravity drain. I swapped mine out while I was there.

The speed bleeders have locktite on them. It's easy to not get them fully seated, or, to overtighten them and snap them. So, when installing the new bleeder, tighten it down, then back off a turn or so, then try reseating again. Take note of its position vs the previous setting, that will determine if you need to repeat.

Ensure you put plenty of towels over the plastic, brake fluid is toxic to the plastic. Minimize time the bleeder is removed to prevent air bubbles getting into the system.

You'll know when you've flushed out the old, fluid color will change to clear going into the collection bag.

Follow the manual for the sequence for bleeding, and don't let the reservoir go empty.
It is not locktite. Why would anyone use a thread locking compound on a brake bleed nipple? It is a thread sealer. The thread sealer is there to prevent air passing the threads when you are doing the bleeding process.
If you snapped one off, you used way too much torque. I've added speed bleeders to eight bikes and I have yet to be so ham handed that one of them has snapped during installation or during subsequent brake fluid bleeding.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Ratcheting Double Box-End Wrench is what i should of used, would of cut the time in half. Also removed the rear reservoir from the engine,much easier to add fluid. Live and Learn, Tips for the next guy. Thanks again for your input!
 

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It is not locktite. Why would anyone use a thread locking compound on a brake bleed nipple? It is a thread sealer. The thread sealer is there to prevent air passing the threads when you are doing the bleeding process.
If you snapped one off, you used way too much torque. I've added speed bleeders to eight bikes and I have yet to be so ham handed that one of them has snapped during installation or during subsequent brake fluid bleeding.
Yes it is thread sealer, not locktite. Forgive the late hour typing.

No, I have not snapped a bleeder off. I have however had to get the remains out where the owner did snap them.

Now that we've cleared that up, the information provided is still worthwhile. Have a great day.
 

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Here is a very good thread about installing Speed Bleeders

yes it is possible to break them or cross thread them but most experienced mechanics will not have any trouble, I have them in my wing and they work great.
 
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