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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK Motorgeeks, educate me. I've looked at a bunch of posts and videos regarding speed bleeders specifically for a 2018 DCT. Numero uno............DO NOT assume I know anything at all. I know very little. BUT, I want to learn. Educate me. Please DO be SPECIFIC.

I should tell you, I've already changed out my brake pads using the Fredster's videos. This post is about the future.

Do I have this correct ?? The speed bleeder simply screws into the current bleeder the bike came with. For a 2018 DCT, 5 bleeder spots ?? I would need 5 of these 'bleeders ?' Just snug it up, no torque values necessary ??

The new bleeders allow me to simply open the valve ONCE ( 1/4 , 1/2 turn ) while bleeding but squeezing the brake pedal and/or lever several times until the liquid runs clear ?? Color good/new fluid, no bubbles at all. It does away with having to open/close, open/close, open/close the valve over and over ?? Just open it ONCE while I squeeze the brakes to my heart's content ?? For me, getting these bleeders is a no-brainer...... IF this is all there is to it. Am I missing anything ??

All the while MAKING SURE that the resevoir does not run dry ?? Also, keep the reservoir cap ON so the system stays more vacuum packed/less chance of air getting in ??

Other than being neat/no spillage of fluid onto parts.................... what else am I missing or need to know ??

Very important obviously.................I saw on THIS site the part # for THIS bike is "SB8125." I also saw "SB8125L. What's the difference IF there is one ??

Remember......... I'm still learning............... NOTHING is too obvious or simple for you to tell me. It may be obvious to you. Probably not for me.

Thanks.

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I would leave the reservoir cap off. IMO, putting the cap on/taking it off again and again just multiplies the chances of drips and spills, not to mention it makes it harder to know when you need to add fluid. There is absolutely NO CHANCE of air entering the system as long as you don't let the reservoir get empty.

This thread may help you.
 
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Hoopdc, I see you've already read the numerous other posts on this topic so I'll just add a couple of things they don't mention.

1. Speedbleeders actually replace the existing bleeder nipples. They screw into the hole in the caliper after you completely remove the existing one. A little fluid will leak out while you do this so have a damp rag handy.

2. Yes, five bleeders required for the DCT (six for the M6).

3. Yes, just snug them up so they don't leak. They are a cone shape going into a precision cone shaped hole so they seal easily but it is high pressure there. The manual says 4 ft/lbs for the original bleeders but Speedbleeders have thinner walls so stay below that figure.

4. SB8125L is the one recommended on the Speedbleeder site. The "L" just indicates that it is slightly longer than the SB8125. Some folks here say the "L" is too long but many of us have installed that model with no problem.

5. Yes, open the bleeder 1/2 a turn and then you can slowly pump the lever or pedal in and out. You still need to attach a plastic hose going into a container unless you want to make a mess. But the idea is that it won't suck air back in on the release stroke.

6. You have to remove the reservoir cap, diaphragm, and little plastic plate - and leave them off throughout. You don't want any vacuum. I usually open the bleeder and give the lever/pedal a couple of pumps to ensure the reservoir is not overly full before removing the two screws and cap.

7. Pump away (slowly) until the reservoir is almost empty. Don't push it too close. Then refill with new fluid and repeat (a couple of times) until you see the fresh colour appear at your plastic tube.

8. Don't overfill the reservoir when done. Just to the line cast inside the reservoir or to just above the window. You still have to replace the plastic spacer and diaphragm and they need space. Ensure the diaphragm is collapsed (folded) and not extended. Make sure the lip on the cap sits inside the diaphragm all the way round before tightening it.

9. Wipe around the cap with a damp rag when done. There always seems to be a little fluid seepage when you tighten the screws.

10. Know which circuit (lever or pedal) leads to which bleeder. Info is on other threads but hand lever goes to the upper bleeders on the front calipers and the foot pedal goes to the lower front bleeders and the rear caliper.

Finally, given your inexperience (good on you for admitting that), you might want to get someone in your area to help/show you the first time.
 

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I just bought the speed bleeders too so I hope to install sometime later this month. Thanks for all the info,
I wasn't sure what the difference was between the original and the SS ones so I just got the original ones. I got a bag to catch the old fluid but I didn't know if I need more than 1 bag
Also I did not get the thread sealant and after I ordered I wondered if I should have?

 

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If you have not purchased your SpeedBleeders yet, shop for the shorter version; Shinhopples is a good source. The shorter ones give more clearance at the calipers for attaching the drain hose. For technique, follow the method Fred shows on your video purchase, except you will only have to loosen each bleeder once for the sequence. The check valve in the bleeders are fairly reliable, but as a "belt and suspenders" attitude, I make sure to course the drain hose directly upward several inches before bending it over to course down to my collection jar. That way I am assured that no air will be near the bleeder opening.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I would leave the reservoir cap off. IMO, putting the cap on/taking it off again and again just multiplies the chances of drips and spills, not to mention it makes it harder to know when you need to add fluid. There is absolutely NO CHANCE of air entering the system as long as you don't let the reservoir get empty.

This thread may help you.

Thanks !!! Makes common sense to me also that no air will get in if it isn't left to run dry. AND .... there is no air in there already somewhere I can't see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hoopdc, I see you've already read the numerous other posts on this topic so I'll just add a couple of things they don't mention.

1. Speedbleeders actually replace the existing bleeder nipples. They screw into the hole in the caliper after you completely remove the existing one. A little fluid will leak out while you do this so have a damp rag handy.

2. Yes, five bleeders required for the DCT (six for the M6).

3. Yes, just snug them up so they don't leak. They are a cone shape going into a precision cone shaped hole so they seal easily but it is high pressure there. The manual says 4 ft/lbs for the original bleeders but Speedbleeders have thinner walls so stay below that figure.

4. SB8125L is the one recommended on the Speedbleeder site. The "L" just indicates that it is slightly longer than the SB8125. Some folks here say the "L" is too long but many of us have installed that model with no problem.

5. Yes, open the bleeder 1/2 a turn and then you can slowly pump the lever or pedal in and out. You still need to attach a plastic hose going into a container unless you want to make a mess. But the idea is that it won't suck air back in on the release stroke.

6. You have to remove the reservoir cap, diaphragm, and little plastic plate - and leave them off throughout. You don't want any vacuum. I usually open the bleeder and give the lever/pedal a couple of pumps to ensure the reservoir is not overly full before removing the two screws and cap.

7. Pump away (slowly) until the reservoir is almost empty. Don't push it too close. Then refill with new fluid and repeat (a couple of times) until you see the fresh colour appear at your plastic tube.

8. Don't overfill the reservoir when done. Just to the line cast inside the reservoir or to just above the window. You still have to replace the plastic spacer and diaphragm and they need space. Ensure the diaphragm is collapsed (folded) and not extended. Make sure the lip on the cap sits inside the diaphragm all the way round before tightening it.

9. Wipe around the cap with a damp rag when done. There always seems to be a little fluid seepage when you tighten the screws.

10. Know which circuit (lever or pedal) leads to which bleeder. Info is on other threads but hand lever goes to the upper bleeders on the front calipers and the foot pedal goes to the lower front bleeders and the rear caliper.

Finally, given your inexperience (good on you for admitting that), you might want to get someone in your area to help/show you the first time.

AussieBoy,

YOWZA !!!! I feel like I've just "read" one the Fredster's videos !!! Thank you for such an in-depth answer. I will heed ALL of your recommendations especially, for me, #s 6 and 7 which I hadn't given much thought to. I love that you even mentioned # 5. Hey.................I was aware but I can eaily see a 1'st timer not really thinking about a hose. Yes. To great seasoned mechanics like "us," it is a no-brainer.
;););)

Thanks again so much !!!

# 2.

p.s. this post reminds of a guy I once asked a question regarding another bike of min years ago. His reply wa something to the effect of "well first, you 'pull' the tank." I stopped him right there !!
And how does one "pull/remove" the tank ?? Of course. This is why the Fredster's videos and replies like yours are valuable AND much appreciated !! Step-by-step is what's needed. Of course.

p.p.s. I really hope one day I can return this favor to you and others who have helped this # 2.
 

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An even cheaper solution is to get a $10 to $15 speed bleeder valve in the hose. You don't risk cross threading a replacement while "quickly" changing each one.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not sure if this applies, but when pumping the brake lever on other bikes I have done, if I pumped it too hard or too quickly, brake fluid shot all over the handlebars. Be careful to do so… Slowly.

Agreed. I certainly did NOT 'know" that. However, COMMON sense seems to dictate this. At least to me it does.

I very much apprecaite the help.

# 2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just bought the speed bleeders too so I hope to install sometime later this month. Thanks for all the info,
I wasn't sure what the difference was between the original and the SS ones so I just got the original ones. I got a bag to catch the old fluid but I didn't know if I need more than 1 bag
Also I did not get the thread sealant and after I ordered I wondered if I should have?


I'm also wondering abiout the thread sealant. When I do buy the bleeders, I'm going to make sure they have the selant on them. As for the bag, on EVERY video I saw, it says the bags ARE reusable. For me, the bags look like a PIA. I just had the fluid empty into an old 1/2 gallon milk container when I bled my brakes which for me was my first time ever. I can see where using these bleeders is going to save a TON of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you have not purchased your SpeedBleeders yet, shop for the shorter version; Shinhopples is a good source. The shorter ones give more clearance at the calipers for attaching the drain hose. For technique, follow the method Fred shows on your video purchase, except you will only have to loosen each bleeder once for the sequence. The check valve in the bleeders are fairly reliable, but as a "belt and suspenders" attitude, I make sure to course the drain hose directly upward several inches before bending it over to course down to my collection jar. That way I am assured that no air will be near the bleeder opening.

prs

I have NOT purchased the bleeders yet. But, for me, this is practically a 'must.' Thanks for the heads-up on Shinhopples. ( funny name ) This info. is going into my personal "Goldwing" file.

I have the Fredster's videos. Have already bled the fluid once. The bleeders are for the future. What a time-saver !!! I WILL check out the long stems vs. the short ones. I'm getting conflicting opinions as to which are 'better.' My gut tells me it's a matter of preference. Also, the shorter ones give more clearance ?? Seems counter-intuitive to me. But, I will check it out.

Thanks for replying !!!!

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you have not purchased your SpeedBleeders yet, shop for the shorter version; Shinhopples is a good source. The shorter ones give more clearance at the calipers for attaching the drain hose. For technique, follow the method Fred shows on your video purchase, except you will only have to loosen each bleeder once for the sequence. The check valve in the bleeders are fairly reliable, but as a "belt and suspenders" attitude, I make sure to course the drain hose directly upward several inches before bending it over to course down to my collection jar. That way I am assured that no air will be near the bleeder opening.

prs

PigeonBoy,

I forgot to mention that I THINK Fred also mentions about bending the hose upward a bit. A nice tip. Thanks. But, I forgot to do it on my first bleed.

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Back during the winter, I purchased the speed bleeders and did the bleeding work. I followed Fred's step by step in his video (except for the opening and closing the valves multiple times on the factory bleeders). I only had 12,000 miles at the time. I also changed the front pads with EBC pads as they were about 75% worn out. I was really surprised in the difference in the brakes response. The brakes were more firm and crisp, I think even better than they were when the bike was new.
 

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These are the ones I ordered, fit the calipers just fine.
Plus they are 8mm wrench size just like the stock size.
Used the stock rubber caps, worked just great.
Remove the exhaust shield above the rear caliper for more working room.
 

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An even cheaper solution is to get a $10 to $15 speed bleeder valve in the hose. You don't risk cross threading a replacement while "quickly" changing each one.
That would certainly do the same job. Just remember you'll need to put some sort of thread seal on the original bleeders in that case otherwise they can suck air past the threads. Of course that means removing the bleeders to put the sealant on them!

Hoopdc - Speedbleeders come with sealant already applied. It seams to last many operations so you won't need to buy the seperate sealant at this time.
 

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Plus one on ordering from Luther, at Shinhopples. You are guaranteed to get the right part. Careful if you try to order from Amazon (experience speaking, here); I plugged in the part number, and up popped a product. When I got the parts, they were the wrong size. I then ordered from Luther. I fully recommend the change to speed bleeders. Good luck

Ride Safe,
Jeff
 
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