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2021 6 speed Wing, 2021 Kawasaki Z900RS, 2019 Road Glide
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Me.....I've banged up against the speed limiter on my BMW (101 MPH) while making a multi-car pass on a two lane rural road.
 
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Me.....I've banged up against the speed limiter on my BMW (101 MPH) while making a multi-car pass on a two lane rural road.
Based on that response, it is assumed you were riding a non-BrenTune K1600 GA. What was your experience with high speed instability often dismissed as "dirty air" on user forums? Considering the ride, but do not want the cotton ball experience again. TIA.
 

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Me. Have hit the limiter a few times in the 7 months I've had my 21 DCT tour.
 

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2018 Honda Gold Wing
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Doesn't really matter to me...I lost my desire to see the top speed years ago...still love fast acceleration thru a few gears in short bursts, but no desire to see high speeds again. I think in 15 years with my 2003 wing I seen 110 mph once. I don't think I've seen much over 90 mph with this 2018.
 

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Doesn't really matter to me...I lost my desire to see the top speed years ago...still love fast acceleration thru a few gears in short bursts, but no desire to see high speeds again. I think in 15 years with my 2003 wing I seen 110 mph once. I don't think I've seen much over 90 mph with this 2018.
there isnt much over 90 to see, ;)
 

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You guys can have all that fun, I don't mind.

Having experienced a wobble @115mph entering a bridge while in a left-hand turn, on a BMW, that's something I can live without!
 

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2022 Blackwing Tour 6sp, Harley CVO Ultra - NW Chicago Burbs
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I'd strongly vote to remove it, whether or not I have any interest in going that fast any longer than necessary.

That said, this brings up an interesting question. I know there was a vendor mentioned here doing engine performance programming. Evidently, they were threatened by the EPA or some Fed Agency, and told any mods that could effect emissions were not allowed. So facing the potential of some heavy fines, he abandoned this service. Surprising as there are all sorts of engine turners in the Harley arena.

My question is, why can't someone do programming for those items, like speed limiter, or other canbus options like turning off fogs with brights, that do not effect emissions? I know in the Auto world, you can do all sorts of custom config changes using programs like Carista. Seems they are not being harassed? Has anyone considered this angle?

Still don't understand how Dynojet and the others aren't getting harassed in the Harley world?
 

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2022 DCT Non-Touring
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I'd strongly vote to remove it, whether or not I have any interest in going that fast any longer than necessary.

That said, this brings up an interesting question. I know there was a vendor mentioned here doing engine performance programming. Evidently, they were threatened by the EPA or some Fed Agency, and told any mods that could effect emissions were not allowed. So facing the potential of some heavy fines, he abandoned this service. Surprising as there are all sorts of engine turners in the Harley arena.

My question is, why can't someone do programming for those items, like speed limiter, or other canbus options like turning off fogs with brights, that do not effect emissions? I know in the Auto world, you can do all sorts of custom config changes using programs like Carista. Seems they are not being harassed? Has anyone considered this angle?

Still don't understand how Dynojet and the others aren't getting harassed in the Harley world?
Oh, they are. All manufacturers of tuning hardware face EPA scrutiny. Here's an interesting read on the subject: The EPA Is Hunting Down Some of America's Biggest Tuning Companies
 

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2022 Blackwing Tour 6sp, Harley CVO Ultra - NW Chicago Burbs
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my bike already does this, from the factory.
Umm, I guess you missed the drift... I said why can't someone do mods for those items NOT emissions related, like speed limiter and fogs off with HB's. Meaning MODIFY or REMOVE those non-emissions related programming.

I hope this helps.
 

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2021 6 speed Wing, 2021 Kawasaki Z900RS, 2019 Road Glide
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Based on that response, it is assumed you were riding a non-BrenTune K1600 GA. What was your experience with high speed instability often dismissed as "dirty air" on user forums? Considering the ride, but do not want the cotton ball experience again. TIA.
I got the Bren tune shortly after that episode. My GA was a bit "squirrely" in dirty air i.e. - behind large trucks at highway speeds. I have experienced this phenomenon on other bikes I have owned as well, most notably a CVO Harley that I had. It was never enough to scare me or cause concern, just something to be prepared for when on the highway. I found a loose grip on the bars helped too. Once the stock tires wore out, I put a set of Dunlop Roadsmart IV's on it and the effect was diminished. I also had a 7Jurock windshield and Aerowings on it. After the Bren tune, I had it up to 145 with no issues. If you are concerned about speed limiters and turbulent air issues, you may want to consider a GT. I rode the GTL before I bought the Grand America and the wife and I both hated the seat. It put her way above my head and made a already top heavy bike even more so.
 
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Well,
I'm the "slow" one in the group. I have absolutely zero desire to do triple digit speed. I've done it a few times in my life and well, it did absolutely nothing for me. I don't get a big thrill out of it. Not to mention, I don't have the luck you folks do. I'd have a Highway Patrol emerge from a mailbox someplace while I was doing that kind of speed and he, OR SHE, would be on my A$$ before I could blink. You folks have fun at that speed. I myself could care less if the speed limiter was set at 90.
Scott
 
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Well,
I'm the "slow" one in the group. I have absolutely zero desire to do triple digit speed. I've done it a few times in my life and well, it did absolutely nothing for me. I don't get a big thrill out of it. Not to mention, I don't have the luck you folks do. I'd have a Highway Patrol emerge from a mailbox someplace while I was doing that kind of speed and he, OR SHE, would be on my A$$ before I could blink. You folks have fun at that speed. I myself could care less if the speed limiter was set at 90.
Scott
You may care if following a string of vehicles traveling below the speed limit on a two-lane road and you pull out to pass only to be met by oncoming traffic because your bike was restricted in its abilities. Been there. Not fun. No disrespect intended to you. You may be comfortable and content traveling 40 in a 60 zone following this group. Me, I'd like the ability to get around them without fear the bike was going to stop accelerating just when I needed it. No, I don't feel the need to run 120 down the interstate. I do feel the need to have the bike perform when I need it to. Just my opinion. YMMV
 

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Pay Wall.
Didn't realize. I use Firefox with uBlock Origin and DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials which blocks all that nonsense.

The text of the article:

While the EPA’s current interpretation of the Clean Air Act (CAA) creates hurdles for the aftermarket tuning industry at large, its consequences are further reaching, and may prevent enthusiasts from building race cars out of road cars. A group of enthusiasts aiming to protect our ability to build race cars have embroiled the EPA in a new lawsuit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. R&T spoke with both sides of this legal battle to better understand the stakes.
The EPA quietly tweaked the language of the Clean Air Act in 2016, which some argue changed the scope of the law entirely. Specifically, the language may prevent one from building a race car from any vehicle that carries a VIN tag. This has created massive issues for the companies responsible for dolling out off-road use parts, with several large brands forced into large financial settlements with the EPA over the past year.
“It doesn't matter what form of racing you want to participate in, that lifestyle is in jeopardy right now, and it has been in a serious way since 2016,” Performance Racing Industry President Dr. Jamie Meyer told R&T.

For background, the EPA released a 600-page document on heavy-duty road vehicles ahead of the 2016 language adjustment. Part of that statement included Proposal 40 CFR 1037.601(a)(3), which aimed to clarify the EPA’s position on these types of heavy machines. The language stated that the Clean Air Act’s nonroad engine and competition exemptions are not applicable to motor vehicles, nor have they ever been. That interpretation means race cars (which are considered “competition vehicles”) built from road cars (which are considered “motor vehicles”) are not exempt from the Clean Air Act.
Proposal 40 CFR 1037.601(a)(3) garnered a fierce response from the aftermarket, and the regulatory agency issued a more clearly worded follow-up. In this message, the EPA noted it wasn’t after individual racers or their vehicles, but rather the aftermarket companies selling race products that frequently end up on the street. In an effort to further quell enthusiast panic, the agency directly addressed its outright support of motorsports.
Based on that about-face, you’d expect the fervor to die down. But the aftermarket insists the announcement was little more than a PR move, as punitive actions by the EPA continued.

“Our position is that the EPA has a gross misinterpretation of this,” Meyer said. “You’re talking about a hundred-year legacy in the United States of modifying street-driven vehicles to turn them into race-dedicated cars. I find it quite insulting that the EPA can say that they support racing but they don’t support any form of tampering. Racing in this country is built on modifying street cars. Period.”
According to Racing Enthusiasts and Supplier Coalition (RESC) co-chair Jon Pulli, the new language surrounding exemptions is the crux of the issue. The language update virtually eliminated the former exemptions outlined in the original definition of a motor vehicle. These included exceptions for vehicles that lacked features associated with safe road use, or features that rendered its use on the street impractical or unlikely. Aftermarket shops have long considered race car builds to belong to the second category of exemptions.
The EPA argues in the lawsuit that the CAA has instead stated that individuals are free to build or purchase dedicated competition vehicles like Indy cars or stock cars.

Pulli points to that statement as a lack of understanding for what amateur racing really is, and believes if street cars cannot be turned into race cars, there is no longer a viable pathway to the sport. The EPA has undeniable authority to interpret the laws, but Pulli argues that the agency has instead taken to rewriting the laws without Congressional input. And while Pulli is a massive supporter of the work SEMA is doing in Congress with the RPM Act, the legislative branch takes its sweet time. Until a party is able to score some sort of victory in court, the EPA is able to continue setting legal precedent that it can use to further justify its actions.
RESC has made suggestions to the EPA on how to move forward in harmony. One such suggestion includes the concept of a new racing licensing system, from which the profits could be used to invest into greater carbon offsets. Pulli’s plans haven’t been well received.

“If you really want to fix the problem, tell us what the problem is and the industry will fix it,” Pulli told R&T. “They have no interest in that whatsoever, and it seems they just want it to be gone. I just want everybody to know what they’re doing. If you’re going to kill motorsports, let's kill it out in the public. You’re not going to do it behind closed doors.”
While the EPA has not said that is seeking to kill motorsports in general, it has been levying huge fines on some of America’s largest aftermarket companies. In the 2021 financial year alone, as noted on the EPA’s website, it has hit Xtreme Diesel Performance with $1,125,000 in civil penalties for selling off-road use parts. Idaho’s Premier Performance, which has “illegally sold devices allowing 3.5 million pounds of illegal emissions per year,” as the EPA puts it, has to pay $3 million. Even JEG's Automotive, known from the back windows of ratty Camaros across the country, was hit with $300,000 in penalties, and is expected to foot the bill for a supplemental environmental project involving school buses, totaling an additional $275,000. Advanced Flow Engineering seemingly got off light by comparison, having to fork over a sum of just $250,000.
As bad as this all sounds, it is important to note that the impacts of this current EPA effort shouldn’t be felt by current race car owners. While the EPA was unwilling to comment on specifics related to the ongoing lawsuit, the agency did provide the following clarifying statement for R&T:
“As a matter of enforcement discretion, the EPA’s longstanding practice has been not to take enforcement action against vehicle owners for removing or defeating the emission controls of their EPA-certified motor vehicles, so long as they can show the vehicles are used solely for competition events and no longer driven on public roads”

The EPA doesn’t perfectly mirror that sentiment in its legal filings for the lawsuit:
Motor vehicles, however, cannot become racing vehicles even if they are used solely for competition. They remain motor vehicles, “designed for transporting persons or property on a street or highway,” and continue to be regulated as such.”
That statement is also noticeably careful to leave out the companies that make racing conversions possible. Pulli himself is aware of this stance, and acknowledges a case like this isn't the aftermarket’s saving grace. He believes that SEMA and other organizations need to politically activate the enthusiast community. SEMA has made this a simple process via its website for the RPM Act, should you wish to voice your concerns. The two sides, which have entered the oral argument process, clearly need to find some common ground to stand on, particularly if preserving amateur racing is a real priority.
Credit: Road & Track, by Lucas Bell 2022
 
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