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I've given up. Half the switches on the handlebars on my 02 either stick, work intermittently, or, in the case of the turn signals, barely work at all. For the past year I really did some soul searching as to whether to get a new '12 or fix the problem on the '02.

For the past two years I've religiously sprayed and cleaned them, used a hair dryer to heat them when they stick in the cold (like reverse which means you are f'ing stuck!), or had the dealer work on the switches. The switches alone can't be replaced! This is ridiculous!

So, I've given up and decided to replace the entire switch assemblies on both sides. The parts alone are $400 plus. But, the engine, tranny, and everything else runs extremely well so I can't really justify buying a new Wing based on reliability.

This seems to be a real topic of discussion among 02 and 03 wing owners, especially in this month's issue of Wing World with Stu Oltman. So, the question is, has anybody else experienced this level of frustration with an older Wing and come up with the same decision as me?
 

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'01 with 180k miles... Every switch works like new. Only the hazard light switch has ever been disassembled. The rest have been kept up with a bath of contact cleaner, wd40 and then contact cleaner again to wash the wd40 out at every oil change. Every switch gets cycled every week. If it seems a bit sticky, it gets another "treatment" bath and a barrage (20 or 30 cycles) of use until it clears up. Non-use is the enemy. it works for me... YMMV
 

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Honda is using grease that dries out and becomes booger like, especially in cold temperatures. This was becoming an issue on my '02 also but I wrecked it before the repair became imperative. I have been watching alot of interesting techniques on TV to get material into tight spots using vacuum. I would have used this approach if I had the chance. Worse thing that happen is it dose not work. Use heavy plastic stuck together with double sided tape around the entire assembly. put in some gasoline or other solvent that won't harm the plastic and apply a vacuum to pull it into every nook and cranny. This will soften up the old grease. Then do it again with dielectric grease in there instead of solvent. Remove plastic and clean the exterior mess up.
 

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I hose mine down in WD40. there is a small gap between the button and the casing. I cycle the buttons after many times. Lately I have been using spray grease in a can. I think it works better than WD 40 as it last longer. I have never had a problem in the winter with it and every couple months I put the spray tube between the button and casing and spray like crazy while working the button.
Probably the better but not easiest would be to crack the case of the buttons and spray inside very well but I tend to take the easy fast route for repair.
My emergency flasher stick as well so i just opened the box housing it behind the button cover and hosed it with a shot of spray grease. Not a problem since. some may not like the spray grease idea but it works and offers not problems later.
Once you get all the buttons working a monthly "tune up" of them and your problems are solved. It makes me wonder why Honda doesn't design them better.
 

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Once a year, usually before a long trip when prepping the Wing (01), I remove all the switches from their mounted location and spray them liberally with contact cleaner. This removes any visible contaminants and dries very quickly. I then spray them very liberally with Tri-Flo lubricant which, when dried, leaves a teflon coating on all surfaces.

I have yet to experience a problem since using this method of cleaning and lubricating.

Tri-Flo can be purchased at bicycle shops.
 

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Sticky Switches

OK, here is what I did. My mute, and cruise control switches kept sticking so I went to the Honda shop and bought a can of Silicone Spray Anti-friction coating. I never took my switches apart but used the spray straw and spray the inside of the switches real good. I kept working the switches for a long time while the bike was sleeping during the winter months. If they would stick, I would spray them some more. Now, they don't give me any problems at all. No sticking!
I think the grease they used could gel and cause the switch to stick. I hear that WD-40 will do the same and cause some sticking, that's why I went with silicone spray instead of the WD-40.
I hope this will help you on your sticky switches. It is better to spend a couple of dollars and try it, than $400 for new switches.
Let me know how you make out.
Good luck!

Rosy
From NH
 
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Move down south to warmer climates! Try Texas! We've been roasting down here and switches never stick! :lol:
 
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