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In the past I have had what I believe you guys call "sudden battery' failure". This has always happened with a Yuasa battery, between 8 months and 2 years old. Does anyone know if they have solved this problem or is there a battery available that has eliminated this problem. I usually replace the battery every 2 years "regardless" and it is time on the 02.
 

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The Yuasa's with the Sudden Battery Failure were wet lead acid batteries, the battery in your 1800 is a different technology, the newer batteries aren't generally considered to have that problem. This style battery should last longer if it is taken care of properly. Your battery should have a long life if kept charged with a good automatic battery charger like the Battery Tender Plus or the Yuasa automatic.
 

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The battery on my 02 died when the bike was 3 months old. One day it worked fine and the next it wouldn't start the bike or even light the lights.
 

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battery

My oem battery is 34 months old on my 01 wing and is still going strong, i will probably replace it before the riding season begins.
JD
 

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The battery on my 02 died when the bike was 3 months old. One day it worked fine and the next it wouldn't start the bike or even light the lights.
More than likely it was caused by your dealer not properly activating the battery before the bike was delivered, dealers often skip this important step. The information below is from Yuasa's FAQ.

What can cause a new battery to fail soon after installation?

If a new battery becomes unserviceable within a few days or weeks after its installation it may be due one or more of the following reasons:

1. A faulty charging system.


2. A short circuit in the electrical system.


3. Battery terminals are dirty or not properly connected.


4. Excessive ignition off drains or high parasitic drains.


5. Electrical capacity of the battery is insufficient for size of the vehicle.


6. The battery has been inadequately activated, dissipating its strength from the outset.

7. The battery, after being filled with acid has been left too long without initial charging, and has been allowed to become sulfated.

http://www.yuasabatteries.com/faqs.asp?action=1&id=15
 

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Yuasa battery life....

I have always had long life with the Yuasa batteries I have ever had with well over two years of abuse (even up to 4). Abuse meaning letting the electrolyte level getting way low (a cell at 1/4 full) before servicing. I always wondered how long they would have lasted if I took care of them.......
 

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I suspect that many dealers may pass on the charging of a battery during the initial setup and merely add the sulfuric acid. You can get about 2/3's of it's intended power (and life) without the charge and it can seemingly pass muster without it. All for the sake of speed and time in a busy service department setting up many bikes. But in order to achieve 100 percent of a battery's intended capacity it must be chargered after adding it's fluid for the first time. This also is true for replacement batteries where you add the sulfuric acid to the cores.

DaleC
 

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Maintenance Charger?

I have read many times that people use Battery Tenders or other such systems to keep their batteries in good condition. I’m a little confused. Is the alternator not keeping the battery charged enough from riding? Why wouldn’t one need to “maintenance charge” their cage’s battery?

I ride my bike just about every day and have never detected any conditions that I would relate to a low battery power. Someone help me understand.

TIA
 

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Craig, the guys that are talking about using battery tenders are the ones (like me) that live in the northern states where you can't ride every day during the winter months. I still don't use one, as there is usually enough good days for me to ride once in a while. Riding every day should keep yours charged up just fine.
 

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My stock '02 Yuasu battery gave up the ghost with less than a year on it. Dealer wouldn’t cover it. Bought a Deka battery, because of reviews.

On a hot summer day, pulled into to get gas and went to restart the bike. At first I got all of the usual indicators, headlight, console lights, etc. Hit the starter switch and the bike went completely dead. No lights, no console indicators. Absolutely nothing.

Always carry a miniature Voltmeter with me and measured the battery to be about 10 volts with the key off and about 5 volts with the key on. No blown fuses.

Had the bike towed to my dealer and they called several hours later and asked me what was wrong with the bike, because it started just fine.

I got on the boards and discovered that the battery probably overheated a weak internal connection with the onset of the starting current and caused a temporary open.

Venco Wings sent me a new battery free of all charges.
There’s nothing like being that "one in a million" person when it's your bike.
 

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I have read many times that people use Battery Tenders or other such systems to keep their batteries in good condition.
I ride my bike just about every day and have never detected any conditions that I would relate to a low battery power. Someone help me understand.
Craig Moore
The answer is very simple, most of us can't ride that often, particularly in the winter time. In my area I can ride almost year round, but there are times in the winter when the weather can get too bad to ride, then the battery needs to be maintianed. If your battery is heavily discharged you need to put it on a charger to regain that charge, riding it isn't enough.
 

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I really got tired of fighting with the dealer on this one. They lost my repeat business, but do they really care? Probably not. Every dealer I've been to seems to have a very high turnover of service personnel. So, I think that their "culture" is basically corrupt to begin with.
 

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I have no idea of how much $$$ these cost, but I saw a report on them the other night on Corbin's Ride On, and they looked impressive.
The Odyssey battery costs about twice as much as the battery in your bike, and it uses the exactly same technology as your stock battery. About 3 years ago Wing World did a battery test of the available maintenence free batteries, the Odyssey battery cost twice as much as the most expensive battery in the test, among the batteries in the test..the Odyssey battery came in dead last. It had the poorest performance of all the batteries tested, it was so bad they thought it might be defective, so they went out and bought another one, it gave the same results.

I love to watch that story on the Odyssey, they talk about they only use the very best materials, and then they give the punch line: "We use medical grade battery acid", one of the funniest jokes I have ever heard, that guy just took any credibility he had and threw it in the trash can!

At the time of that battery test, the Westco came out the winner, the DEKA came a little later and was tested to compare to the other batteries, Stu said the DEKA had the best performance of any battery he had ever tested.

http://www.eastpenn-deka.com/products/small_engine_power.html
 

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Maybe these will help you understand...

http://www.yuasabatteries.com/motor_battery.asp

http://www.yuasabatteries.com/electricity.asp

One correction, Wingman. The Westco did not come out on top. It was the Yuasa and it's house-branded clones - the Sears Die Hard and Interstate - that came out on top. The Westco was very acceptable, and we deemed the Champion marginally acceptable. Just after filling (before charging), one example of the Champion became very hot and boiled acid out of the safety vent.

The Oddysey battery that we tested was an application for the GL1500. Rather than the 21 amp-hour rating of the standard GL1500 battery, the Oddysey was rated at only 16 amp-hours. That's likely the reason for the poor performance on the timed load and multiple start tests.

Another problem we had with it was what the manufacturer claims as one of the big advantages; it can take a large inrush current and can be recharged hundreds of times. Because we don't have total-loss electrical systems, the number of available recharges is irrelevant; the key lies in not having the battery go flat in the first place. And actually, it NEEDS a larger current to charge it, larger than your voltage regulator will permit at or above 13.5 volts. We were unable to recharge the Oddysey above 13.5 volts with any of the motorcycle battery chargers tested. Only when we attached a 6-amp automotive charger did the battery voltage rise above 14 volts. We felt this phenomenon, which Oddysey is well aware of, would result in these batteries being in a permanent state of partial discharge in actual use. And because they were only 16 amp-hours to begin with, we felt that unacceptable.

Naturally, we heard from several owners of these $169 marvels claiming they were the best battery they'd ever used. Maybe so, especially if they'd previously been buying $29.95 specials from J.C. Whitney. Regardless of price, we felt all of the other tested batteries were better suited for automotive service. Had we been testing batteries of equal capacity for trolling motors, wheelchairs, or uninterruptable power supplies, the Oddysey likely would have topped the list.

We followed up some time later with a test of the DEKA product. Yes, we found it could sustain more engine start loads before dropping to our terminal test voltage, though the advantage wasn't earth-shaking. The big advantage of the DEKA is that it's factory filled and initialized, eliminating problems that result from improper preparation. The Westco shares this advantage.


Stu
 
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