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Transmission shifting is a mechanical operation. When the components are made properly, either its in gear or it isn't. Mass production of components that are cast and have not been through a final finishing process will have too much variance. All it takes is a lazy shift and if all the parts don't align perfectly, it will not hold. I've had an 01, 04, 06 and '10. The 2010 ghost shifted before I had gone 25miles after leaving the Dealer when I bought it new and probably a half dozen times after that. The others never did it.
 

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Reason it occurred again, immediately after rebuild, was due to an improper, and incomplete repair, by a less then knowledgeable TECH.
i came to this conclusion after reading diligently almost every post on this forum for the next few years, especially those concerning shifting problems, and when it comes to who to believe on this forum, Greg will not lead you far from the Golden path when it comes to Goldwing Transmissions.
After looking at pictures posted by Greg, and looking at my repair list of parts installed, during repair, it was obvious that not enough parts had been replaced.

Shift firmly and completely and you will probably ride it for many trouble free miles.

Bob
Had you considered contacting Honda with your discovery. If all these transmission problems are cause by rider error, you could have saved Honda millions of dollars in their warranty repairs by telling the customer that "it really is their fault." Also, Honda changed their gear design in 2014 from a hi/low dog design, to an all-tall-dog design, for 4th and 5th gears, and maybe all that was not needed, and your in site could have save them add'l research and development money. Hopefully in the future, when you catch thing like this, alert them and steer them on a better coarse.

Sorry for the sarcasm, but could your knowledge be short sided ??? After all, you are only looking at pictures and going by personal experience of one motorcycle. I'm not trying to downplay that, but your personal experience is based on only your motorcycle, or a few. When Honda redesign 4th and 5th, I'm sure they did that considering warranty projections on thousands and not based on a handful, or just 1.

At least in my mind this brings us back to a rider who has had 3 new GL1800s. The first 2 didn't have transmission problems but the 3rd one did. Are you saying that while riding his 3rd newest one, that his shift habits must have changed ??? And if so, and this is probably the most important point of all of this, should a transmission by design, be so delicate that the slightest change in shift habits, will change its life expectancy from say 10,000 miles to 200,000 miles. Keep in mind that a better design would be one that is extremely forgiving especially when considering that riding habits from rider to rider can be very different, and from GoldWing to GoldWing even more so when one considers that many get triked, pull trailers, and occasionally all that plus carry 2 very over weight people.

When thinking about that, consider this ... when the GW was first being developed, prior to GL1000 days, Honda spent 2-years developing their own drive shaft. It had to survive an accidental downshift into 1st gear at 35mph. For you, would surviving a 15mph test have been acceptable, or would a better design, one that has higher requirements, such as 35mph, have been a better choice. After all Honda's reputation is on the line too. Building faulty or "delicate" products will lead to a faulting reputation.
 

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I can only speak from experience. Not an engineer or Honda mechanic. My buddies and myself have not had these issues on our 13 F6B's. I have 58k plus and they have similar mileage. I bought my bike new. Two things I have done in this area is first I bought the Kuryakin Mini Boards which allow some adjustment so I have the left one set back all the way and tilted down a notch to allow more room under the shifter. Other is I use Rotella T6 full synthetic since new. Its a great bike and I hope you get many enjoyable miles. Just so you know....not all 13 F6B's have the issue and it may not be as prevalent as some would think.
 

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Other is I use Rotella T6 full synthetic since new.
I tried Rotella T6 on my first oil change.
I kept it in the bike for 1 week.
The 1-2 shift was so clunky that I thought there was something wrong with my trans.
Went to Amsoil full syn for 1 year after that.
The shifting was nice and smooth, no 1-2 clunk, UNTIL the oil was around 3k miles in use and/or the ambient temps were above 80F and the bike had been ridden for more than a half hour.
I went back to straight dino 10W-40 after that, no more syn, and no issues whatsoever.
 

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Honda redesigned some of the internals of the GW transmission for the '14 model year.
You should be having no issues with your F6B unless it has been abused, or you have big feet and wear big work type boots.
I know a guy in FL who went through 3 transmissions on his '13 F6B, all because he drove it like a sport bike.
He loved speed shifting.
I have driven a '14 and it was snick-snick smooth compared to my '13.
That being said, technique and footwear are critical to clean shifting.
I have a size 13 foot, and early on I knew footwear was critical.
You must lift the shift lever straight up at 90 degrees when upshifting.
If your boot is too high (thick), pressure will not be applied to the shifter straight up at 90 degrees, but on an angle.
I have found the best boot maker for me is Alpinestars.
Work boot type footwear is a no-no if you have big, wide feet.
This angular loading of the shift lever will result in imperfect and/or missed shifts.
I have found that upshifting at 2.8k - 3k rpm will result in a nice clean shift.
I find preloading of the shift lever is unnecessary.
Also, you don't need a full pull on the clutch lever while shifting.
Pulling half to 2/3 of the travel of the clutch lever allows for a cleaner shift, which will be smoother than using a full pull.
Rolling off the throttle rather than fully closing the throttle during shifting will also make for a smoother and cleaner shift.
Above all, NEVER speed shift. (wide open throttle and no clutch), but by the sounds of your riding style, that is a non-issue.

I would somewhat disagree with your comment about Honda's engineering being the best.
Their transmission design for the 01 to 13 model years attests to my statement.
There are other examples of Honda Goldwing engineering being directed more by the bean counters than the engineers. (cracked frame recalls, brake recalls, radiator redesign, alternator drive gear redesign, etc).

Sure, compared to some manufacturers, their bikes seem bulletproof.
But they are not.
Read the owner's manual regarding scheduled maintenance, do your recommended maintenance as scheduled, ride the bike as it was designed to be ridden, and you'll be good to go.
I believe your bike will respond appropriately, and your likely issue is shifting style, not mechanical failure, if the bike was not abused by previous owners.
What about the floorboard with the heel toe shifter, anybody use one of those do they help with smooth shift? thanks
 

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What about the floorboard with the heel toe shifter, anybody use one of those do they help with smooth shift? thanks
I use Kuryakyn Floorboards and Heel/toe shifter. I wouldn't claim it helps or hurts. It's just a preference thing that works well for me.
 

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I use Kuryakyn Floorboards and Heel/toe shifter. I wouldn't claim it helps or hurts. It's just a preference thing that works well for me.
I see nothing wrong with a heal-toe so long as inspecting it's action becomes part of servicing the Wing every 4,000 miles. Unfortunanly for most, that becomes the "catch." Most won't know how to properly inspect its movement.
 

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I see nothing wrong with a heal-toe so long as inspecting it's action becomes part of servicing the Wing every 4,000 miles. Unfortunanly for most, that becomes the "catch." Most won't know how to properly inspect its movement.
Hi thanks for the Quote as long as the up/down movement (full range movement) is still working and not falling apart I would think that's all there is to inspect
 

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My history is British twins from '65 to '78 and, considering that horrible technology, never had a transmission problem or maybe my expectations were so low, never noticed. In 1978 I bought a new Goldwing and operating that bike was a completely new experience. I never had a transmission failure but often clunked gears and missed a shift periodically. In 1995 I went with VT1100C2 Honda Shadow ACE and put a heel/toe shifter on. I kept stalling it. After a year I stopped stalling it. That bike is so smooth I didn't even know what helmet clunking was. Now I have added a 2018 Goldwing and my shifts are terrible. Missed a few shifts and sounds bad. I went to a large dealership and rode some older and newer Goldwings and about the same shifting so in my case it may be me.

After 25 years with the VT1100, I was so accustomed to the throttle/clutch/shift/clutch/throttle that the switch back to Goldwing has been difficult. What I am doing that seems to work, is to forget my earlier procedures. I am actually using the really low rpm shift points in the manual (to 2nd at 20km to 3rd at 30km up to 6th at 60km). What this is making me do is to learn how to ride this motorcycle. I also am using the 2018 ECON mode that has a throttle response closer to the VT and would recommend that for newer riders. I think that my problem, rather than transmission, has been throttle response. On my VT throttle is on or off while on these multi cylinders the throttle response is not as subtle and that may be an issue.

So my advice would be to find a dealer that has some demos and try to see if other GLs are similar.

G.
 

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Hi thanks for the Quote as long as the up/down movement (full range movement) is still working and not falling apart I would think that's all there is to inspect
That's only part of it, but it is more about side-to-side movement. Since there is no spec, most will not know when a heal-toe has reached side-to-side limits.
 

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I see nothing wrong with a heal-toe so long as inspecting it's action becomes part of servicing the Wing every 4,000 miles. Unfortunanly for most, that becomes the "catch." Most won't know how to properly inspect its movement.
Yes, I was having problems shifting at one time (not ghost shifting) and it took a while to finally realize that it was falling apart at the pivot point. I had to remove it and tighten it up. Put some blue Loctite on it. And it's been fine ever since. I have the same thing to install on my new 2017 and I'll be making sure that is taken care of from the start and make sure there's no binding.
 

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Yes, I was having problems shifting at one time (not ghost shifting) and it took a while to finally realize that it was falling apart at the pivot point. I had to remove it and tighten it up. Put some blue Loctite on it. And it's been fine ever since. I have the same thing to install on my new 2017 and I'll be making sure that is taken care of from the start and make sure there's no binding.
What you're describing usually means that the housing is worn. To test ... remove the entire heal-toe assembly on the left side. Once off, verify that when the heal-toe shift lever is moved up/down, that it does not move the Allen pivot bolt on the back side. The pivot bolt should have no movement ... it must remain stationary. If movement, the mount it bad and a whole new heal-toe kit is required.
 

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What you're describing usually means that the housing is worn. To test ... remove the entire heal-toe assembly on the left side. Once off, verify that when the heal-toe shift lever is moved up/down, that it does not move the Allen pivot bolt on the back side. The pivot bolt should have no movement ... it must remain stationary. If movement, the mount it bad and a whole new heal-toe kit is required.
The bolt was falling off. Very loose. This happened years ago when the bike was 1 or 2 years old. I think it just wasn't tightened up right when it was installed. However this is a good reminder to inspect it and make sure it's still functioning properly.
 

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[
Had you considered contacting Honda with your discovery. If all these transmission problems are cause by rider error, you could have saved Honda millions of dollars in their warranty repairs by telling the customer that "it really is their fault." Also, Honda changed their gear design in 2014 from a hi/low dog design, to an all-tall-dog design, for 4th and 5th gears, and maybe all that was not needed, and your in site could have save them add'l research and development money. Hopefully in the future, when you catch thing like this, alert them and steer them on a better coarse.

Sorry for the sarcasm, but could your knowledge be short sided ??? After all, you are only looking at pictures and going by personal experience of one motorcycle. I'm not trying to downplay that, but your personal experience is based on only your motorcycle, or a few. When Honda redesign 4th and 5th, I'm sure they did that considering warranty projections on thousands and not based on a handful, or just 1.
So is this an argument of "if there wasn't a design problem then Honda would spare itself the cost of warranty repairs and R & D cost and just it on blame rider technique?"

This is answered by how Honda handled the brake recalls. If people had simply followed the maintenance schedule and did hydraulic fluid changes on time or mileage there wouldn't have been particulates in the old, stanky brake fluid to clog the return ports and lock up brakes, catch bikes on fire, and toss riders onto their heads. All it takes is a few high dollar lawsuits and "fixing" the transmission and redesigning master cylinders to be more tolerant of abject neglect is cheaper.
 

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So is this an argument of "if there wasn't a design problem then Honda would spare itself the cost of warranty repairs and R & D cost and just it on blame rider technique?"

This is answered by how Honda handled the brake recalls. If people had simply followed the maintenance schedule and did hydraulic fluid changes on time or mileage there wouldn't have been particulates in the old, stanky brake fluid to clog the return ports and lock up brakes, catch bikes on fire, and toss riders onto their heads. All it takes is a few high dollar lawsuits and "fixing" the transmission and redesigning master cylinders to be more tolerant of abject neglect is cheaper.
I would say most of that is true. I'm sure Honda saw they had a problem with their transmission and was analyzing the cost for warranty repairs. But there's also a flip side to that. Honda seems to be a company that's willing to maximize their learning curve from many things that they manufactures. Many problems the 5th gen had are examples ... the frame, the brake recall, the transmission, poor handling, etc. Many companies would have walked away from the transmission problem only learning that the high/dog design was a poor choice, and nothing more. In Honda's case they continued doing research and development searching for an effective way to minimize their issues. There is no such thing as a perfect product; however, if you've been in the GW world for a long time, when they launch a new model, often owners will say "just when they perfected that last one, they come out with a new one." To me it seems Honda get smarter by being smarter than all the other ... it seems to be their culture, and I greatly admire them for it.
 

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I did an informal/unscientific poll on another F6B site. I asked if anyone with a 13 F6B had ghost shifting or other transmission issues. Out of 19 replies, 14 reported no problems. Of the 5 who said they have had any issue at all, it was ghost shifting only. Of those 5, 3 were 13 models, one was an early 14 and the other was a 15. None of those who reported the issue felt the need to have further work done as it was a random, once in a while thing. Some reported it got better with more miles. Some also said they changed shoe type or added different pegs/boards to make sure they had solid shifts.
If I take the 15 model out of the mix....18 total, 14 no issue gets us to a 77.7% good with over 22% reporting they have encountered ghost shifting on the 2013. That is a pretty high rate which Greg had alluded to.
 

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I still don't think that most riders know what the ghost shifting that Greg alludes to really is.
It's not a missed shift because of boot size or improper operation of the shifter.
 

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I still don't think that most riders know what the ghost shifting that Greg alludes to really is.
It's not a missed shift because of boot size or improper operation of the shifter.
Some had mentioned they did not feel they had a solid upshift to 5th and thats why it may have jumped out of gear.
 
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