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My Wing has never had anything but a car tire on it since the day we bought it. A friend who was riding behind me this weekend, commented that I looked like I was working way to hard while riding the twisties. When we got home, he told me to come over to his place. He has a spare wheel with a MC tire mounted up that he would let me try. We switched it out yesterday, and I felt like I was being drawn to the light. Riding in the track was smooth and steady, with little to no wander. Corners were smooth and easy, with little effort required to stay at speed and in the track. I also felt like I wasn't so worn out when I got home. It's got me thinking about picking up a spare wheel and mounting a MC tire up for the tight twist and turns of our local rides, reserving the Pirelli for the long road trips around the Northwest with the trailer. The Force is strong with this one!
 

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Grasshopper, only you will know what is right for you. Be flexible in your thinking
 

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Depends on uour riding style and the tire you use. Example: a Kumho is a very stiff, square sided tire. Great for slab riding. Follows uneven surfaces badly, tries to push the bike over when coming to wheel ruts at intersections. Tends to resist the twisted. BUT, my older riding partner preferred that tire because it helped him keep the bike upright during stop and go traffic.

I prefer the Yokohama avid envignor. All the safety and benefits of a run flat, with a rounded profile that works well in the twisties. So maybe you might want to try a different tire?

If you're ever in my neck of the woods, I've got a couple of different tires. Including a 704/709 available for test rides. No charge, plenty of local twisties to try them on...
374274
 

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Arkansas Ridgerunner
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This gets me to thinking back on the reason I made the switch in the first place. I ride a lot of twisty curvy roads and the thing that I hated about the MC was the noise and vibration. After about 2-3 thousand miles the rear tire would began to sing. Then it would begin to buzz and before it was gone it turned into a pretty good vibration. At the time I tried several different brands and found they all had that problem. Some were more pronounced than others.

My CT experience was so much smoother than the MC. The other benefits such as the runflat capability came later.

Having said all that, its your bike and you got to do what trips your trigger!!

On another note, I have three rims. They come in very handy when trying out different tires and using them for different purposes!
 

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Arkansas Ridgerunner
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"in a dark place we find ourselves , and a little more knowledge lights our way " :rolleyes:
I think, often we find ourselves wondering around in the dark, trying not to bump into the wall!! 😄 😄😄😄😄
 
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I have been DDS for about 66,000 miles, have worn out 1 Dunlop WS, 1 Pirelli SC, 1 Bridgestone DG, and now on my 2nd DG. Worst experience was the Dunlop, which required a lot of work to tip in, going into curves. Best experience was the Pirelli, but it wore out in 10,000 miles. Overall, I prefer the DG and, over time, had convinced myself it required no effort whatsoever for tip in. I also learned to counter steer as if second nature, which reduces tip in effort. I especially appreciate the safety of run flat technology, and appreciate the CT's extra mileage.

Then I recently bought a Suzuki V-Strom, and the difference is night and day. It does not require any tip in or counter steer, and seems to just follow the curves almost by itself. I know the GL and Strom are two completely different bikes, but also believe some of the difference is between car and MC tires. When this DG wears out, I plan to remount the old Dunlop MC tire on the Goldwing, at least long enough to wear it out. I am willing to bet the Goldwing will handle a lot more like the Strom, with a MC tire on its rear. Even so, all things considered, I still prefer CT on the GoldWing. But will no longer be able to convince myself it actually makes the bike handle better than with MC tires.
 

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When I bought my 2012 from a guy it had an MC tire on it. I had 100,000 miles on car tires on my 07. I rode the MC tire till it wore out and replaced it with a Runflat car tire.
I noticed the difference also. I liked the way the bike just rolled into the corners. Not enough to make the switch back to round tires though. I still prefer the car tire for mileage and traction, especially in the rain. The difference in handling isn't enough to make me go back.
 

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IMHO, this conversation needs to go back to a few basics about motorcycle riding: risk management and riding style. Let's look at each. Of course, the points raised here are not all-inclusive, as you might have other considerations.

RISK MANAGEMENT
Regarding tire choice, you have to look at the pros and cons of each tire you consider. We all know there are differences between different motorcycle tires (MTs), as well as between car tires (CTs). Then there are differences between MTs and CTs. Let's look at the strengths and weaknesses of MTs and CTs.

MT Strengths
Profile and weight allows for easy corner entry / exit

CT Strengths
Load ratings allow for safer two-up riding and towing
Tire availability, especially when away from home
Run considerably cooler, preventing heat-related failures
Runflat CTs help you get to a place of safety
A catastrophic loss of runflat tire pressure is survivable
Relatively significant grip on wet or dirty surfaces

MT Weaknesses
Load ratings result in the motorcycle frequently being unsafely loaded at or above the total tire ratings
Generally only available at motorcycle shops
When under stress from loading or hard riding, MT temperatures can lead to heat-related failures
A flat MT pretty much locks you into the failure locale
A catastrophic loss of MT tire pressure is generally a bad event
Relatively low grip on wet or dirty surfaces

CT Weaknesses
Profile and weight requires more rider input to enter / exit corners
Depending on profile, CTs can tend to follow ruts and uneven tracks
Non-runflat CTs pretty much lock you into the failure locale
A catastrophic loss of non-runflat CT tire pressure is generally a bad event

RIDING STYLE
The riding styles of Gold Wingers varies widely, from simple cruisers to sport-bike canyon carvers, and everything in between. One isn't any better or worse than the other, it is just a matter of personal choice and sometimes locale. Since any particular riding style will ultimately be somewhere between these extremes, let's look at the extremes a little closer.

Cruising
Unless your bike is heavily loaded, it really doesn't make much difference which tire you run. But at the same time, don't underestimate the safety implications of riding a long time on stressed tires. Since cruising, by its nature, doesn't create handling situations that differentiate between MTs and CTs, there is not much to consider. However, there is a meaningful difference in mileage and tire cost, which equates to significant $$ savings with CTs.

Sport-Bike Canyon Carving
Conversely, this riding style constantly creates situations that differentiate between MTs and CTs. On dry, clean surfaces, both can perform well. MTs are a little easier to maintain good curve management. CTs require more diligent turn input. Because of differences in natural heat generation, there is some evidence that MTs may lose turning grip over extended periods of hard twistie riding. CTs do require more physical work to negotiate twisties, which can lead to rider fatigue and/or loss of concentration. However, on wet or unclean surfaces, there is no comparison. CT siping and contact patch provide better grip and rider safety. There is much rider evidence to justify this point.

No matter which tire is used, one thing that definitely impacts twistie speed is rider technique. For a variety of physical reasons, the typical cruiser technique of pressing down on the handlebar in the direction of turn is slower and can result in dragging hard parts on the road surface. This is definitely a safety issue. Moving one's body into the direction of turn actually increases lean angle and speed. I bring this topic up to highlight the fact that improved rider body control helps keep the good part of the tires in contact with the road surface, which is a definite safety point. While we are thinking about lean angle for a moment, let's clear up one typical misconception about CTs and lean angle: Unless you significantly modify a Gold Wing, you can't lean one far enough to get onto the CT sidewall. You will hit hard parts first.

CONCLUSION
My purpose in making this entry was to help riders remember why they make the choices they do. Some riders prefer the feel and nimbleness of MTs. Some riders prefer the various safety and financial advantages brought by CTs. Either choice involves recognition of the various advantages / disadvantages of the chosen tire. My hope is that we all know why we choose the tires we use and accept the associated risks.
 

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Bill, I got a question. I just saved this message to my bookmarks. I would like to make sure it is okay for any of us to use this info when trying to help some of the new guys that come along. This could be excellent information to refer back to ... after a time it will likely get lost in all the other information here.

A lot of excellent information all in one spot!! (y)(y)
 

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Bill, I got a question. I just saved this message to my bookmarks. I would like to make sure it is okay for any of us to use this info when trying to help some of the new guys that come along. This could be excellent information to refer back to ... after a time it will likely get lost in all the other information here.

A lot of excellent information all in one spot!! (y)(y)
Sure, I don't see why not. It is just a summation of things I have experienced in my riding life, as well as a TON of info from others that are far more experienced and skilled than I.
 
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Elrod I believe you nailed it, about as accurate and comprehensive as I've ever read. Thanks!
 

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I just read what you posted three times (not Because I couln't understand what you wrote, BUT Because it all made complete sense Thank you!

Ronnie
 

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Sure, I don't see why not. It is just a summation of things I have experienced in my riding life, as well as a TON of info from others that are far more experienced and skilled than I.
Thank you!! I think often important pieces of the Darkside discussion can fall off the wagon as we move forward. Your post does a great job of getting important items back in place.

Thanks for taking the time to put all that information together.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the replies everyone. I started this thread somewhat in jest, but some very good information has come because of it. Elrod, your input is awesome, and if I may, it points to a simple statement that's been around for years that pretty much sums it up. The right tool for the job! For the local rides around here, the MC tire makes sense, turns are easier, there's less wander in the lane, and after what should be a fun ride with friends, I'm not worn out. On the other hand, when Leslie and I are out on one of our 2 week plus vacation trips with the bike and trailer loaded and 2-3,000 miles + planned, the CT shines. It will handle the load, the ride is comfortable, being a run flat it won't leave us stranded alongside some hidden highway, I know it won't wear out because the temperatures suddenly soared or dropped, and when we come across that stretch of road that has become a dirt path because of construction, we're still safe and upright. I'll be adding a spare wheel with a 704 mounted to our accessories, which allows us to enjoy virtually everything good about our Goldwing.
 

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Bill, nicely done, you are gifted with the keyboard. I like to add one thought to all that. Motor tires are the best they can be when they are new and get somewhat less than best as they wear. Especially for slab riders. Tires squares off more as the motor tire is used up. The CT gets better as they wear for corner carving as they round the edges. On the slab, they are the same from start to the end of their life. As to getting tired riding curvy roads all day, I am not seeing enough of a difference to notice it. Maybe I don't ride hard enough to be qualified to answer that question.
 

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As to getting tired riding curvy roads all day, I am not seeing enough of a difference to notice it. Maybe I don't ride hard enough to be qualified to answer that question.
:oops: 😄😄😄😄😄😄😄😄😄😄:rolleyes:
 
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As to getting tired riding curvy roads all day, I am not seeing enough of a difference to notice it. Maybe I don't ride hard enough to be qualified to answer that question.
Now that's funny right there, I don't care who you are. You are super-skilled, such that you don't have to work at all to negotiate twisties faster than anyone else! You recall me being frustrated that I could not keep up with you and TravelinLite, even though he was smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee the whole time? Well, here we are 6-7 years later and I have not caught you yet! I have improved, but you are in another class. Do you even sweat? 🤣🤣🤣🤣
 
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