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Good day to all,
I have many questions regarding my new Goldwing. If I were a steak one might describe me as being well marbled (flirting w/ 400 lbs).
My previous bike was a VTX. The day I purchased the X, I set the suspension to its highest level in an effort to minimize metal to asphalt. It worked well and I rarely noticed any bottom-outing (sp).
Now with the Wing I tend to set it for the stiffest suspension for the same reasons. My interest lies in how the stiffness of the suspension compliments (or deteriorates) handling. This question is not necessarily aimed at my supersized physique but more-so toward the physics of the suspension.
Thanks much!

Terry
 

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kellyty:
Good question. I believe the answer you are looking for is two fold. First, your right, having the bike bottom out is not good for the suspension or the suspension parts. But secondly and I think more important is the pitch relationship between the rear end and the front end. Think of it this way. Ever see one of those pickup trucks loaded down with whatever in the back. The rear end has bottom out and the front end is pointed at the sky !!
From a stability point of view the front has very little friction between the tire and the road surface so in this case controllablity is greatly reduced. Also, when braking is applied not enough of the weight can transfer from the rear brakes to the front which helps greatly in stopping. Conclusion. Linked braking system with the hydraulic anti dive unit on the front of the goldwing is what makes for a safe motocycle from a stability standpoint and braking capability during a maximum effort stop.
 

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kellytk,

I would contact the folks at Traxxion Dynamics and have them explain a solution that would meet your requirements. They are knowledgeable and used by many folks on this board. I would trust what they have to say. Good Luck and enjoy the ride. http://www.traxxion.com/
 

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You need heavier springs at a minimum. Traxxion
 

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Hey Terry, first congrats on the new Wing. Second, as from someone who knows, a lighter load would be best. Push yourself away from the table, ingest no more than 1,200 calories per day, walk 2+ miles a day, & you can lose some weight. It won't cost you any more for extra accessories for the suspension, & save you a bunch of money on the grocery bill. I'm not being a smarta$$, just trying to help you to enjoy the ride, & the Goldwing will appreciate it. I started out on my quest on February 23 (9 weeks tomorrow 4/27), & as of this morning, I've lost a whopping 43 lbs. I'm not one of the lucky few ,that needed to lose 50 lbs, to get to normal. NO, I was 310 lbs., with high blood pressure, shortness of breath when walking just a few feet, & couldn't buy jeans at Wal~Mart any more. Just 9 weeks later, I've dropped 4 pant sizes, 3 shirt sizes, & I can even see my toes(among other things), when standing straight up. I have a long way to go, but I plan to be under 200 lbs by Christmas, & to be at my fianl goal of 175 by Valentines day, 2010. IF I CAN DO IT, ANYONE CAN DO IT! Good luck, & ride safe!
 

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When you increase the suspension setting it does not make the suspension stiffer it only changes the ride height
 

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When you increase the suspension setting it does not make the suspension stiffer it only changes the ride height

I'm not sure this is true. Can you explain how?


John
 

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When you increase the suspension setting it does not make the suspension stiffer it only changes the ride height
This is hogwash. Maybe there is something wrong with your bike but on my current 08 and previous 01 GL1800, I can certainly tell that the rear suspension is riding firmer the higher I set the preload number. But you are partially right, the ride height does increase as the preload number is increased.
 

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When you increase the suspension setting it does not make the suspension stiffer it only changes the ride height

:agree: :agree: :agree: :agree: :agree: :agree: :agree: :agree: :agree:



The preload adjuster just "expands" raising the rear of the bike
 

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Lets try to explain this:

The spring rate will not change with the preload as per the explanation below.

Spring rate is the amount of force that is required to compress, extend, or twist a spring one inch. Usually spring rate is measured in pounds per inch.

Constant rate springs deflect the same amount each inch. An example would be: 200 lbs. = 1 inch deflection, 400 lbs. = 2 inch deflection, 600 lbs. = 3 inch deflection, and so on.

When you add preload, as in the above example you shift the load capacity of the spring to a higher value. ie: you need more weight to make the spring move the same distance.
So if you need 200 lbs to compress the spring 1" without preload,
and you then add 1" of preload, you now need 400 lbs to make it compress 1".
So the ride becomes stiffer, but the spring rate remains the same.

The Wing has a hydraulic adjuster and uses little numbers, but the principle remains the same.

Ref to http://www.springworks.com/faq.html

Trev.



 

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I suggest that you also pay very close attention to your tires. Inflate them to max recommended two-up pressure and check them regularly. You are riding at the Honda recommended two-up weight (that is your choice, so I have no comment on that). At 900 lbs, the tires on this bike are running at about the limit of the present state-of-the-art it appears. Otherwise, we would be seeing greater lifetimes and fewer failure reports. You might want to check the Darksiders sub-board and ask if any are in your weight range or ride two-up frequently. Also beware that the footpegs can drag on a GL1800 with damage only to the peg slider nuts (as long as you don't grind them off), but any further gets into hard parts that tend to lever the tires off of the pavement. Raising the rear (you do know that it only adjusts the rear?) suspension will raise the ride height by changing the spring base and thus give more room to compress the spring before rear suspension components bottom, but it does not change spring rate or shock damping. It also does not change the front suspension at all. You probably will need a bit stouter set of front springs from Traxxion, Proressive, Race Tech, etc. to be happy there. To change shock damping, the suggestion to contact Traxxion is right on. They may have other suggestions, also. You should be OK on moderate twistys with the Honda stock setup and high suspension numbers as long as you watch the tires. Keeping up with some of these guys on the board would require a visit to Woodstock, however.;) I would also suggest you keep the extra saddlebag and top case loading to a minimum.
 
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