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Just got my first 1800, an 05. What do you recommend for suspension settings for two up (95% OF THE TIME) with total driver and passenger weight at 475 lb plus luggage?
 

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gopdebeek said:
Just got my first 1800, an 05. What do you recommend for suspension settings for two up (95% OF THE TIME) with total driver and passenger weight at 500 lb plus luggage?

Congrats on the 05 wing. I picked up a new 05 in October 06 and love it.

Are you still riding in BC??? You have the country side for riding. I'm planning a move to Vancouver Island in the next couple of years.

Cheers.

Zeebo
Ontario, Canada.

PS - regarding the suspension - I would be riding with 15-20. I also have my tires up to the max.
 

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gopdebeek said:
Just got my first 1800, an 05. What do you recommend for suspension settings for two up (95% OF THE TIME) with total driver and passenger weight at 500 lb plus luggage?
Friend, without any intention of offending you, I'm gonna give you a little tough love here. The max load capacity of your bike is 417 pounds. Motorcycling has inherent risks. But at 500 pounds with a passenger, you're gambling your lives by riding this motorcycle. And don't even think of adding luggage. I just finished modifying the suspension for a fellow and his wife who weigh just over 500 pounds combined. This, after they had a rear tire explode on their previous GL1800. That little episode resulted in a totalled bike and a helicopter flight for two to a trauma center. They're both lucky to be alive, and they know it. The improved suspension will keep them from bottoming out - almost, but it won't do a thing to prevent another tire failure. If you're going to ride the bike loaded like that, it's critical to your safety that you insure the tires are always inflated to the maximum cold pressure shown on the sidewall. This fellow didn't, though he claimed he now knew how important it was. Before I began suspension work on his second Wing, I checked his rear tire - 30psi! The tire had 4,000 miles on it, and the tread was delaminating from the tire carcass. I talked him into a new set of tires and a SmarTire system to warn him of low pressure/high temp. Please - we'd like to have you around for a while. This loading issue is no joke, especially when the two of you are so far above the bike's capacity. Oh - the answer to your question (95% of the time) is #25.

Stu O
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Stu. I really appreciate your response, advice and sentiment especially coming from you. Our weight is closer to 475 but that is probably splitting hairs.

Would upgraded suspension like Traxxion or Progressive be helpful? If so which specifically? Have always run my Metzeler 880 on my 1500 at 41 F 42 R. What should I run my tires at or just the sidewall max?

I would really be interested in more comments concerning weight maximums on the Wing. I have seen some very large people with lots of luggage in my travels.
 
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Stu tells it like it is for sure . I would guess over 50% of Wingers ride their bikes overloaded . The stock suspension really on an 1800 is crappy period . Do yourself a favour and send a letter to Mike at Traxxion and ask the same question and what they would recommend. I know they can set you up with the proper spring rate front and back and give you a super handling bike to boot. Personally I think ANYONE who owns or is buying an 1800 should figure the suspension upgrade just as part of the initial expense of Wingin .
PS the tire monitor is a really good idea for a bike as well .
:)
 

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gopdebeek said:
Would upgraded suspension like Traxxion or Progressive be helpful? If so which specifically? Have always run my Metzeler 880 on my 1500 at 41 F 42 R. What should I run my tires at or just the sidewall max?
If I were you, I believe I'd have both tires set at max cold inflation pressure. I say that based on the condition of the tires on the bike I talked about above. Re: the suspension - no doubt Traxxion has a good setup that they can tune to your specific load requirements. As a bonus, they'll fix your preload adjuster if necessary, and it probably is. With the loads you're carrying, your adjuster should be fully functional, meaning it should start pumping down the spring before the #1 even appears on the display. If you're not doing the Traxxion thing, Progressive makes some good stuff, but I like Hyperpro's fork springs better. They prevent excess sag better and ride better, IMHO. The Progressive rear shock/spring combo seems to work well, and it provides a way to set it up with additional initial preload. The Catch-22 here is that it uses the OEM preload adjuster, so the thing will be no better than a stock setup if the adjuster isn't in top shape.

I'm leaving now for a GWRRA Christmas party in Prescott - won't be back till Sunday.

Later,

Stu
 

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The proper tires for the GL1800 are load range B and the rear of both my Metzler and Dunlop D250 are 826 lbs (375kg). I don't have a front D250 to check, but my front Metzler is rated at 599 lbs (275kg).

I am not sure what the ratio of weight from front to rear is, but if you consider that the bike weighs about 900 lbs, then lets add another 500 lbs to that for a total weight of 1400lbs. If the split was 50/50 it would be about 700lbs per tire which is still 126lbs under the limit for the rear tire and the front would be over it's limit by about 100 lbs.

Seems to me like the front tire would actually be operating closer to it's limits when the bike is overloaded, but again, that would depend on how the weight is actually distributed, but given that the engine is pretty far forward, I would bet that the front tire has more weight on it than the rear most of the time.

My *guess* is that the rear tire failure Stu cited above was caused by running the tire with low pressure. The added weight may have contributed to the failure by speeding up the heating process of the tire carcass, but I don't think it was the cause.
 

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Fred H. said:
The added weight may have contributed to the failure by speeding up the heating process of the tire carcass, but I don't think it was the cause.
Didn't say it was. Yes, his tire was underinflated, just like 50% of all rear motorcycle tires are. That's why the SmarTire went on. At least now he'll have that amber icon flashing at him. What he does about it is out of my control. FYI, I think you'll find that 50/50 assumption is incorrect when rider and passenger weight is added to the basic bike. Dunlop's rally inspections have shown many Wings with well over 1000 pounds on the rear tire. :shock:

Stu
 

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Stu and Fred

I can't think of anything more entertaining and informative than reading Fred H and Stu O debate the mechanics of the Gold Wing motorcycle. Its like a free seminar. Thanks Fred, Stu for humbling yourselves to my level of expertise and posting your thoughts. Wish I knew a tenth as much as you guys.

bj max
The ******* Files
Minnesota Motorcycle Monthly
 
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