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Discussion Starter #1
Owned my 1800 for 8 years now. Have done every type of maintenance possible to it, with the exception of the swing arm. Any suggested maintenance to the swing arm bearings, and if so, whats the easiest way to get them apart to service?
 

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Swing arm maint

I suspect most wings, even with several hundred thousand miles on them have never been serviced, but always good to check. Unless you are having a weird tire wear or handling problem, you are ok, but if you do a search on the tec forum you will find a lot of info. There is a specific procedure for checking for play, and setting the bearings on the swing arm. Unless you did a lot of pressure washing( never a good idea ), you a most likely ok. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Anyone pull off their swing arm? What did you find for wear/grease on bearings? Any special tools/sockets to do the job?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have the factory Honda socket that is used to torque the steering head bearings. Is this the same socket used for the swing arm bearings?
 

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I have the factory Honda socket that is used to torque the steering head bearings. Is this the same socket used for the swing arm bearings?
No, it's diferent.
 

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Wing One where did you purchase these tools. I have an 08 that acts pretty squirrely in high speed curves. My front and back suspensions are new and good, just wondering if it could be coming from Swing Arm.
 

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Wing One where did you purchase these tools. I have an 08 that acts pretty squirrely in high speed curves. My front and back suspensions are new and good, just wondering if it could be coming from Swing Arm.
I have an '07 and experienced the same. Took it to the dealer and the wing tech cussed and grumbled (he always does) that in a bazzilian years he has never seen those loose blah blah blah.

I asked to please check them anyway to humor a pain in the ass grumpy old man so they/he did. He apologized and said they required almost a full turn to get to torque. This was with around 37K on the clock and had just replaced the head bearings, installed new bushings in the forks and installed a new trike take off shock.

Squirrel behavior in the curves went away when he tightened the bearings. The dealer didn't charge me but I bought the tech lunch.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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Discussion Starter #10
If it ain't broke, don't mess with it.

$.02
Generally, I would agree with you when it comes to light bulbs...(no maintenance required till they stop working....) :lol:
Pretty much everything else eventually requires maintenance, I just don't like to wait till something fails...
 
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Swing Arm Bearing Adjustment Proceedure

[h=2]As posted in the How to, step by step, sub-forum......

Swing Arm Bearing Adjustment Proceedure[/h]
GL1800 Swing Arm adjustment procedure
I used the steps below to adjust my GL1800 swing arm bearings. The following photograph show the tools I thought I needed.

The two pieces with the swing arm label I got from JustWings.

The Swing Arm Nut Socket and 19mm Hex stock are crucial. Along with those tools you will need a 1/2 inch long breaker bar, a 19mm socket, a 5mm hex key to remove the swing arm covers and a torque wrench.
Several months ago I ordered the two special tools needed to do this job from Greg at JustWings.com. so that I would have them on hand. I wasn't sure when I was going to tackle this job. After placing my order it took less then 4 days to get them into my hands.
This photograph shows the tools I actually used.



1) Place the bike on center stand and lower the rear shock preload to zero.
2) Remove swing arm pivot covers in front of pass floor boards.
3) Loosen lock nut on L side
4) Loosen pivot bolt on L side
5) Loosen pivot bolt on R side and re-torque to 80 ft lbs. (Note, I found that this pivot bolt would not budge, I had to use my big torque wrench with the extension to get it to break free. )


6) Torque L pivot bolt to 25 ft/lbs
7) Remove from center stand and bounce rear suspension and re-center stand bike back off L pivot bolt and re-torque to 25 ft/lbs
9) Torque lock nut to 72 ft/lbs as shown in Service Manual


10) Reinstall covers
My bearings were only slightly loose, now they are just right. During next weeks commute to and from work I will make a note if there is a ride or handling difference. But since the adjustment was slight, I may not notice. YMMV.
 

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COUPLE YEARS AGO GOLDWINGGREG ON FORUM BROUGHT HIS TOOLS TO HOT RODS BBQ (THERE OUT BUSINESS NOW ) AND DID TORQUE ON ANYONE WHO WANTED . IF I RECALL JOHNACMAN WAS WAY OUT OF SPECS ( LOTS MILES ON BIKE ) SOME ARE ANAL ON OIL CHANGES AND AIR FILTER CHANGE AND THEN LET OTHER THINGS GO ???? TOOK LESS THAN 15 MINUTES TO DO IF YA GOT THAT SOCKET ! GOOD LUCK . MILES = SMILES ON A WING :thumbup:
 

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As posted in the How to, step by step, sub-forum......

Swing Arm Bearing Adjustment Proceedure


GL1800 Swing Arm adjustment procedure
I used the steps below to adjust my GL1800 swing arm bearings. The following photograph show the tools I thought I needed.

The two pieces with the swing arm label I got from JustWings.

The Swing Arm Nut Socket and 19mm Hex stock are crucial. Along with those tools you will need a 1/2 inch long breaker bar, a 19mm socket, a 5mm hex key to remove the swing arm covers and a torque wrench.
Several months ago I ordered the two special tools needed to do this job from Greg at JustWings.com. so that I would have them on hand. I wasn't sure when I was going to tackle this job. After placing my order it took less then 4 days to get them into my hands.
This photograph shows the tools I actually used.



1) Place the bike on center stand and lower the rear shock preload to zero.
2) Remove swing arm pivot covers in front of pass floor boards.
3) Loosen lock nut on L side
4) Loosen pivot bolt on L side
5) Loosen pivot bolt on R side and re-torque to 80 ft lbs. (Note, I found that this pivot bolt would not budge, I had to use my big torque wrench with the extension to get it to break free. )


6) Torque L pivot bolt to 25 ft/lbs
7) Remove from center stand and bounce rear suspension and re-center stand bike back off L pivot bolt and re-torque to 25 ft/lbs
9) Torque lock nut to 72 ft/lbs as shown in Service Manual


10) Reinstall covers
My bearings were only slightly loose, now they are just right. During next weeks commute to and from work I will make a note if there is a ride or handling difference. But since the adjustment was slight, I may not notice. YMMV.
Nice write up Larry, Thanks.
 

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My experience is that re-torquing the bearings made a very noticeable difference in handling. I suppose they loosen so gradually that it is unoticable until one day you notice the bike is tracking funny. At first, I thought it was the tire slipping in oil or on those white strips, but that was not what it was. Most can probably tell if they are loose. Does not take much. BTW, it only takes a few minutes to tighten. Not a big project at all. I got the tools a few years ago at one of the big powersports dealers... do not remember which one. :oops:
 

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My experience is that re-torquing the bearings made a very noticeable difference in handling. I suppose they loosen so gradually that it is unoticable until one day you notice the bike is tracking funny. At first, I thought it was the tire slipping in oil or on those white strips, but that was not what it was. Most can probably tell if they are loose. Does not take much. BTW, it only takes a few minutes to tighten. Not a big project at all. I got the tools a few years ago at one of the big powersports dealers... do not remember which one. :oops:
They need to be treated just like any tapered bearing. I retorque my front and rear tapered bearings every 24k.
 

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They need to be treated just like any tapered bearing. I retorque my front and rear tapered bearings every 24k.
I'm sure they are sorely neglected. Most do not even realize they are there.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Great info folks, thanks for the replies!!!! :)
 

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I just changed my 07 swing arm bearings, 82,000 kms(51,000 miles) found the right bearing completely dry and rust pits on the race and cage, left bearing was properly greased. Go with Honda bearings if needed, the All balls have an external seal that will off set the swing arm 1/32 inch to the left. I used a homemade socket made from a 1 1/4 impact socket.
 

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I just changed my 07 swing arm bearings, 82,000 kms(51,000 miles) found the right bearing completely dry and rust pits on the race and cage, left bearing was properly greased. Go with Honda bearings if needed, the All balls have an external seal that will off set the swing arm 1/32 inch to the left. I used a homemade socket made from a 1 1/4 impact socket.
Any symptoms of a problem? Also, did you feel any improvements when done?
 
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