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Canuck
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I was planning on ordering a set of the tapered bolts shown below from Cyclemax. https://www.cyclemax.com/inc/sdetail..._set/76/247206 However, I saw a video on Traxxion's website where Max shows that these tapered bolts actually push their tapered point right into the gas tank of the 2018+ Wing. Not sure if that happens with the pre-2018 Wings.

Has anybody experienced these tapered bolts on their Gen 2 Wings? Good? Bad? Waste of $$? Is there a better alternative?

TIA.

 

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Marketing gimmick in my opinion. Threads should be lined up to be able to install and start the bolts using finger tools. If they were better and a more reliable install, I think you would see them used more widely by manufactures. Screws and bolts are made by automatic screw machines and the cost would be about the same except for the extra material used.
 

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Tapering a bolt does not make it longer, if anything, a bit shorter. As long as the replacement tapered bolt is not longer than the original, it is not gonna puncture the gas tank, nor anything else. However, about 30 seconds on a bench grinder will make a tapered bolt out of an original bolt. I just use a Phillips screwdriver to line up the holes before putting the bolt in.
 

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Purchase about 2 feet of 3/8" wooden Dowel. Cut this Dowel into four pieces and sharpen the ends with a Pencil Sharpener.

Align the Seat with the Dowels. Then replace each Dowel, one at a time, with a Tapered Bolt.

Mine show a bit of dirt from use over the years. FWIW, I resharpened them for this picture. The #2 Pencil is for comparison.

A bit of Rubber Glue or a film of RTV Sealant on the outside circumference of the Rubber Bushings in the Seat, that the Bolts go through, helps to keep them from falling out of place during this whole installation process.
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Just file a small taper on your existing bolts to help start them. With a good 6" to 8" mill file will only take about 20 minutes to do all 4 bolts.
If you taper your exiting bolts (which is an excellent thing to do) it's a good idea to run a die onto the bolt before you grind or file it. When done with the filing and/or grinding removing the die will clean the last thread so that you're not trying to do it with the aluminum frame of the bike. FYI, Aluminum is softer than the steel of the bolt. No sense torturing the threads on the bike with any burrs that are probably left on the bolt you just filed or ground.
 

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If you taper your exiting bolts (which is an excellent thing to do) it's a good idea to run a die onto the bolt before you grind or file it. When done with the filing and/or grinding removing the die will clean the last thread so that you're not trying to do it with the aluminum frame of the bike. FYI, Aluminum is softer than the steel of the bolt. No sense torturing the threads on the bike with any burrs that are probably left on the bolt you just filed or ground.
Or just hit it on the wire wheel a couple of times, while there at the bench grinder. If you don't have. If you don't have a dye, as mentioned, just install a nut on the bolt, then spin it off. Anyone who does not know how to clean threads, one way or another, probably should not be attempting to taper their own bolts.
 

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Vendor
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Thus far, the best seat bolts are the OEM ones. I see more thread damage done by aftermarket seat bolts then by OEM seat bolts.

My advices ... learn to properly line up the bolt holds by properly fitting the seat, prior to installing the seat bolts.
 

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Thus far, the best seat bolts are the OEM ones. I see more thread damage done by aftermarket seat bolts then by OEM seat bolts.

My advices ... learn to properly line up the bolt holds by properly fitting the seat, prior to installing the seat bolts.
I concur, and also will add that using a tap to chase the bolt holes every couple of years will do wonders to the ease of threading.
The fibres from the seat stuffing as well as road dust and grime really bungs up the internal threads.
 

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I'm not what you would call a Max fan, but I will say that his seat bolts for the 18+ are the best out there. Enough that this cheap guy invested in them!
 

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The tapered seat bolts work good for the pre 2018s. Makes it easer to get the threads started. If you want to save the bucks these aftermarket ones cost I'm sure grinding and cleaning the threads on the OEMs will work just as well.
 

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Two other things that I do that make this annoying seat installation a bit easier:

1.) Insert the Wooden Dowels without the Seat Handles. By doing it this way, you're trying to line up just one less thing. That and the Seat Handle isn't exactly a light weight object in the scheme of keeping a number of things all lined up all at once. After the Seat and the Bushings are lined up with the Wooden Dowels inserted. THEN slide the Seat Handles over the Dowels. At this point you can remove one Dowel at a time and replace it with the Seat Bolt.

2.) The Passenger Seat Back is actually very easy to remove and replace. It's only held on by two Phillips Head Screws. If it is a Heated Seat, there is a short wiring harness that connects it to the bike. No need to disconnect the Wiring Harness, just leave it alone. Remove only the two Phillips Head Screws and the Passenger Seat Back can be moved enough that it will not interfere with or make the alignment of the Main Seat any more difficult than it needs to be. The extra work that removing and replacing these two Phillips Head Screws represents, is minor compared to the advantage that it gives you.
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Thus far, the best seat bolts are the OEM ones. I see more thread damage done by aftermarket seat bolts then by OEM seat bolts.

My advices ... learn to properly line up the bolt holds by properly fitting the seat, prior to installing the seat bolts.

Agree. I use a number 2 phillips screwdriver to align each bolt, just finger tight until you get all 4 started. My 2012 is easier than my 2004 was.

The tapered bolts seem like a good idea but are easier to strip the threaded hole.
 

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Your advice ?? Remember, I'm a # 2 mechanic based on my own 0 - 10 rating system. Even I would properly line up the seat before attempting to inset the bolts. Is this not simply common sense ?? Soooo, while your advice is most definitely sound, my question is who WOULDN'T first line up the seat properly ???
 

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No need for never seize, the problem is not seizing but cross threading.
If someone buys the stainless steel tapered bolts then you need to use anti-seize to prevent the bolts from Gauling. Stainless loves to gaul and then snap off.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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I've never been able to align the bolt holes on my Corbin to get the bolt started. I ordered a set of the tapered bolts, but they're about as tapered as a brick. Yeah, I've applied grease to the other contact points of the seat but it just won't move enough to get either bolt in so the seat just sits on there
Yeah, I'm sure the seat will go flying off some day leaving me sitting on the electronic stuff under the seat.????!!!??!?!?!!????
 
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