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So sad to hear of the loss of yet another biker to that cage that turned left in front of him. I'm sure the cage driver said "I never saw him."

Fact is, this is the most common mishap scenario for motorcycles involving a car. And all the drivers say the same thing - "I never saw the bike."

One technique I have found useful for that car that is preparing to turn left is to WATCH THE VEHICLE'S WHEEL. They can not fake you out if you are looking at the wheel. If you look at their face, eye contact, whatever, that is no guarantee that they won't pull out. The wheel will not lie.

Other things to consider:
1) Move to the opposite lane if it is a multi lane road, if possible
2) Always consider yourself invisible
3) Use another vehicle, if possible and feasible, to 'set a pick' for you. Manuever to place this 'pick vehicle' between you and the vehicle who may be turning. The turning driver WILL likely see the car.
4) consider 'Visibility ugprades' to do anything and everything to make yourself more visible.

I am so saddened when I hear of these kinds of accidents. We lost a dear friend a little over a year ago in our chapter to just this type of scenario and in that particular instance, the vehicle appeared that it was stopped and then she 'faked out' our friend at the last second.

WATCH THE WHEELS!!!!!!
 

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... and SLOW DOWN through all intersections !!!

ASSUME that someone will try to nail you ... ride accordingly ...

My biggest concern is with the oncoming vehicle in the left turn lane with no turn signal on ... driver obviously doesn't know what he/she is doing. :roll:
 

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I believe movement helps. A point source of light coming straight at you is very hard to judge. Moving or even a slight weave from the left to right track and back can help to catch their eyes.
 
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So sad to hear of the loss of yet another biker to that cage that turned left in front of him. I'm sure the cage driver said "I never saw him."

Fact is, this is the most common mishap scenario for motorcycles involving a car. And all the drivers say the same thing - "I never saw the bike."

One technique I have found useful for that car that is preparing to turn left is to WATCH THE VEHICLE'S WHEEL. They can not fake you out if you are looking at the wheel. If you look at their face, eye contact, whatever, that is no guarantee that they won't pull out. The wheel will not lie.

Other things to consider:
1) Move to the opposite lane if it is a multi lane road, if possible
2) Always consider yourself invisible
3) Use another vehicle, if possible and feasible, to 'set a pick' for you. Manuever to place this 'pick vehicle' between you and the vehicle who may be turning. The turning driver WILL likely see the car.
4) consider 'Visibility ugprades' to do anything and everything to make yourself more visible.

I am so saddened when I hear of these kinds of accidents. We lost a dear friend a little over a year ago in our chapter to just this type of scenario and in that particular instance, the vehicle appeared that it was stopped and then she 'faked out' our friend at the last second.

WATCH THE WHEELS!!!!!!
You are so very correct about this being the single most dangerous interaction that we face with the cager set. The wheels turned to the left is a great clue, but you really have to make sure their wheels/tires stop rotation.

People use to follow the rule that says not to actually turn your steering wheel to the left until you begin the actual left turn. Now they stop with their wheels already turned to left, so that if they were to be rear ended they would end up being pushed into the oncoming traffic as well.

When I am faced with someone attempting a left turn I do the following:

1. I Keep my speed nearly constant and ride towards the center portion of the lane. (rapidly changing speeds makes it hard for cagers to judge how close you are).

2. My index and middle finger are covering the front brake and ready to stop in a split second.

3. I am scanning for the driver's eyes to see If I see them looking my direction or if they seem distracted.

4. I am watching their left front wheel for movement

5. I am doing a mirror check to see what's behind me. If nothing is close behind me there is a good chance the driver may turn left in front of me. If there's a big SUV/Pickup right behind me, chances are they will see the SUV/Pickup and not turn left in front of me.

6. Finally I wear high viz jacket and brightly colored helmet. BE SEEN. Black is not a good color for a jacket.

Otherwise... Ride and enjoy... None of us knows when its our turn to go, but you can take steps to improve your odds
 

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I installed the Kisan headlight modulator several years ago. If I see a vehicle getting ready to turn left or pull out from a side entrance, I flip it on. I DO get noticed! No, not a perfect solution but it helps to stack the odds a little bit more in my favor.

I also slow down, change lane position if applicable, cover the front break and expect not to be seen ... just in case.
 

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I believe movement helps. A point source of light coming straight at you is very hard to judge. Moving or even a slight weave from the left to right track and back can help to catch their eyes.
I agree, it is one of my procedures. When I am approaching an intersection with a cage waiting to turn left I do a little movement left and right. Motion camouflage will make you invisible. Also, some people have this junk hanging from their rear view mirrors ( dice, handicap parking permits, etc. ) and you may be right behind that in their line of sight. When that is the case it doesn't matter if you are wearing hi-vis or have your lights on....they can't see past the big fuzzy dice.
 

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I installed the Kisan headlight modulator several years ago. If I see a vehicle getting ready to turn left or pull out from a side entrance, I flip it on. I DO get noticed! No, not a perfect solution but it helps to stack the odds a little bit more in my favor.

I also slow down, change lane position if applicable, cover the front break and expect not to be seen ... just in case.
nice to see some use this tool right,kudos!!
 

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Is there a technique?? Posted is where another couple died due to a left turn situation.

I dunno, I guess we all have our moments.

I simply watch them, not the drivers but the vehicles and the tires. I pay little attention to the driver and or the signals and so on, I watch the front wheels.

People tell me all the time, Hey I saw you, I waved at you but you did not see me. True, I saw the vehicle. Not you.

Intersections and roads are getting bigger, four lane, six lane, and the travel distance to get across one is more distance. If it is clear I am through it before they can react, if one is turning left, I slow it down, I want to be able to stop if need be maintain balance , no feet down and go one way or the other if need be.

Those turning left out of driveways, I watch them too, but as soon as I am able to safely accelerate past them before they can react, I do so.

I think it is simply one day you do not pay attention. I have never done that on a bike, but I have come close in the service truck. Be thinking about something, not paying attention and almost ...............

Not so serious in a vehicle at moderate speed, some bent sheet metal and torn up vehicles, call the insurance man.

On a bike you do not get a second chance and I am very aware of that. So I do pay attention.
I watch the front wheels, tells me a lot what they are up to. Never trust, never fully relax, even on the lazy back roads ,see a vehicle sitting in a drive, feet off the highway bars, sit up at attention and pay attention. Relax after you are past them.
 

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A lot of times I slow down and motion them to make the turn, this puts me a little more in control of the situation. There are of course other factors to consider (traffic behind you & them, speed etc) but if all it takes is reducing my speed and flashing my lights then the wave to motion them through I do it. I am liking the power of the 'Wing compared to the Harley, a quick twist of the wrist and I am past most situations much quicker. Also agree with previous post about a weave or other motion to increase awareness, great technique. Almost like a pump fake to freeze the driver.
 

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In addition to the above suggestions, all of which are good, if for whatever reason the cage is making me nervous I will flash the brights a couple of times to jog their brain.

I always watch the wheels for the slightest movement. This is the most accurate visual reference I've found.
 

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In addition to the above suggestions, all of which are good, if for whatever reason the cage is making me nervous I will flash the brights a couple of times to jog their brain.

I always watch the wheels for the slightest movement. This is the most accurate visual reference I've found.
Down here at some times that's telling the driver," Go ahead, I see you , I'm being polite by letting you go ahead and turn and not have to wait for an opening any longer." Tells the driver you will slow down or stop to let him turn.:22yikes:
 

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I use a technique in that moment of uncertainty when you don't know if they are about to wait or turn in front of you.

I give the bike a violent swerve to hopefully catch the drivers attention. I beleive that it causes a driver to hesitate and try to figure out what he is seeing. They may even think that there is something wrong with my motorcyle and I'm about to crash.

When riding with others I usually get questions about why I'm doing that. It looks kind of weird but it does work (so far !!)
 

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I just stay normal. Trick riding and light flashing could confuse oncoming driver. It's hard to say how they (other driver) will interpret any unusual actions on my part. We don't know the other driver and don't know if they've been to ''our signals'' school.

You know trains are noisy, and very visible, but people still pull out in front of them. I always expect they'll pull out in front of me. Keep front tire pressure adjusted for max load.


...louie
 

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I just stay normal. Trick riding and light flashing could confuse oncoming driver. It's hard to say how they (other driver) will interpret any unusual actions on my part. We don't know the other driver and don't know if they've been to ''our signals'' school.

You know trains are noisy, and very visible, but people still pull out in front of them. I always expect they'll pull out in front of me. Keep front tire pressure adjusted for max load.


...louie
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

People pull out in front of trains.

People run into large yellow buses.

People pull out in front of big red fire trucks with lights and sirens.

There is only one defense, you, are it. Stay observant. There is no other solution.

A few months ago, sitting at the supply house, watching traffic, a train came by. People all lined up waiting on the train.

Along comes a liquor cycle, runs right into the last car. Plastic fenders and seat and him and front light all over the road. Once he stood up, I laughed so hard ...............

I mean duh!!!

No reason, they just do.
 

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Oh good...since they can't see me anyway, I guess I can quit riding around in a clown suit :joke:

Seriously, some good tips here, and some I personally wouldn't do; like signaling someone to proceed in front of me, unless it's at a 4-way stop, and everyone is stopped. Flashing lights can be too confusing and interpreted as an OK-GO IMO.

I've tried to wave people to go (not on the bike), and get the 'who me?' look...then I figure they are not going (based on the blank stare), they figure out it was them being signaled to, and now we're in an instant near-hit situation.

I do what most probably do; watch the front wheel of the questionable vehicle, cover the front and rear brakes, heighten my situational awareness i.e. escape route, and assume they do not see me and will want to ruin my day given the chance. It has saved my bacon a few times...once in an empty shopping center parking lot, it can happen anywhere.
 

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E=mc2

Energy equals mass times velocity squared.

900# GW times 40 mph squared is 1,440,000
900# GW times 30 mph squared is 810,000

That's a LOT less energy.
 

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I believe movement helps. A point source of light coming straight at you is very hard to judge. Moving or even a slight weave from the left to right track and back can help to catch their eyes.
:agree:

This technique has worked well for me through the years.

Ride safely.

.
 

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I agree . I keep my eye on the car until I pass the intersection. I try to make eye contact. My bike is bright red, if the driver if the car can't see it or the headlite odds are they aren't going to see a hi viz jacket.

Always keep my fingers on the front brake ready to grab some brake.

Something I have been trying is moving the bike a foot or so to one side or the other so the driver see's the headlite move, maybe makes me more visible.

NEVER assume that because the car is slowing down as he comes to the intersection that they are going to stop. Plenty slow down and then gun it because they don't see you but see the vehicle 100 feet behind you and they want to beat them. I always assume they are going to run the stop sign/red light and act accordingly.





You are so very correct about this being the single most dangerous interaction that we face with the cager set. The wheels turned to the left is a great clue, but you really have to make sure their wheels/tires stop rotation.

People use to follow the rule that says not to actually turn your steering wheel to the left until you begin the actual left turn. Now they stop with their wheels already turned to left, so that if they were to be rear ended they would end up being pushed into the oncoming traffic as well.

When I am faced with someone attempting a left turn I do the following:

1. I Keep my speed nearly constant and ride towards the center portion of the lane. (rapidly changing speeds makes it hard for cagers to judge how close you are).

2. My index and middle finger are covering the front brake and ready to stop in a split second.

3. I am scanning for the driver's eyes to see If I see them looking my direction or if they seem distracted.

4. I am watching their left front wheel for movement

5. I am doing a mirror check to see what's behind me. If nothing is close behind me there is a good chance the driver may turn left in front of me. If there's a big SUV/Pickup right behind me, chances are they will see the SUV/Pickup and not turn left in front of me.

6. Finally I wear high viz jacket and brightly colored helmet. BE SEEN. Black is not a good color for a jacket.

Otherwise... Ride and enjoy... None of us knows when its our turn to go, but you can take steps to improve your odds
 
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