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Discussion Starter #1
THE GOOD------- I live in the country on 220 acres with a private 10-acre lake and the nearest neighbor is a mile away. There are more cows than people in this part of the Ozark Mountains. Along with thousands of miles of hilly and curving blacktop, 2-lane roads = GREAT RIDING!

THE BAD----------To get to that blacktop it is dirt roads (3 miles out to the east, or 2 miles out to the west), the roads are mostly red clay and gravel, and they get really dusty in dry weather. I ride 35 MPH max on a normal day.

THE UGLY--------Near the house the road is pretty solid, and near the pavement it is pretty solid, but, the middle, low stretch is very soft, and after a rain it gets pretty slick, but is manageable most days. However, the one thing that is hard to get used to, has happened to me twice since I got the Wing in September. That is, getting caught on the dirt road after the road grader grades the road just before or after a good rain. Rain and road grading don't mix, the loose dirt turns to slick mud.

THE RIDE---------I started out the other day and I came to the low spot. Suddenly, to my surprise, the muddy spot I am in is a mile long - YIKES! You guessed it, the road grader went thru the day before, and it rained over night and the low spot was a mess. The mud was anywhere from a 1/4 inch to 3 inches deep, complete with ruts in the really bad spots, and very, very slick.

Thanks for letting me sound off folks, gotta go. I'll check in later!

Elk Man

P.S. Any guesses on how this predicament turned out? (To be continued...) :shock:
 

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I guess that is the price to pay for living in paradise. Hope it turns out OK for you. Nothing slicker than wet mud.
 

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Elk Man

I spent last year pushing mud as well, although only 1/2 mile twice daily. My legs out in pontoon mode the whole time. The GL1800 can do it better than another tourer, say a K1200lt. Still not fun expecting your bike to go down at any time.

After a year, I had to move
 

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My guess for part two is, after you walked your bike out of the mud, you got on your cell, no, stay that, there'd be no cell phone reception out there, after you walked your bike out of the mud, you went back home, called the plower on the land-line, offered him/her a case of Coors and they were there the next day to fill in the low spotz?
ps if I'm correct will you invite me and the Ms out there to breath in some of that lovely, fresh country air?
 

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Had that happen once myself, fenders filled up with mud and the front tire wouldn't turn. Had to walk 1 1/2 miles home getting bit by skeeters all the way. It took the SO, a 4 wheel drive pickup and a chunk of rope to get me out of the mud. Then I spent the rest of the evening washing mud out of the bike. BUT I didn't tip it over cuz it was in the mud so deep I just got off and it stood there without the side stand till I got back. Like I said it just happened ONCE and I learned. SO said here's your sign :lol: :lol: now Hope you faired better?
 

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I have a similar situation with a place in the mountains near Yosemite National Park. In the winter the issue would be some very slick clay. In the summer the issue is dust and washboarding. Cleaning the dust would be impossible because if you washed the bike after the ride it would get real dusty going down to the highway to begin the ride. It is only a mile and one half, but that is more than enough to do the job.

The good news is that this is premier riding country. So I think my answer will be an enclosed motorcycle trailer that I will use like a mobile garage. Just keep the Wing in it and when you ride just pull it down the road, open it up and go. I would not use the Wing as an errand runner, just for 100 mile and up rides. I am thinking that if I decide to go for an errand runner, I would get a KLR650. The bonus is that there are hundreds of miles of great fire trails.

Seems to me the situation is similar in Mo. A trailer may solve the problem.
 

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sounds like u live in an area where many others only wished they lived in !

someday it will probably get blacktopped and then u can talk about how rough it was in the good old days
 

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Got caught on a road like that in Iowa last summer after a rain. Had a hard time just turning around, front tire wanted to just keep sliding. Bad time to have a trailer on it. Went right to the car wash. Tim
 

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I can remember just this last summer while following some good ol boys from Ohio through some back roads that was a short cut to the BRP. Now this particular road started out as two lane blacktop. It slowly got narrower than turned into a 1-1/2 lane hard pan type road. There were a couple bridges to cross and each one was a mud packed slimey ride. Then the road went to a one lane gravel (some loose) and then low and behold just 1 mile from the parkway it was barricaded.. LOLOL

We then got good experience and practice going back over it again.. It was a great trip and I will always cherish those memories. We were just lucky there were bridges to cross... :wink: :wink:

To have to ride that way every day like you do, only tells me how much you like to ride..

Enclosed is a picture:

 

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Discussion Starter #12
THE REST OF THE STORY!!!

The rest of the story

First I appreciate and enjoyed all the replies. Now for the rest of the story. When last we met, I was telling you about the good, the bad and the ugly of living in the Ozarks hill country. I will pick up the story with a refresher of THE UGLY then on to the ride from HELL!!!

THE UGLY--------Near the house the road is pretty solid, and near the pavement it is pretty solid, but, the middle, low stretch is very soft, and after a rain it gets pretty slick, but is manageable most days. However, the one thing that is hard to get used to, has happened to me twice since I got the Wing in September. That is, getting caught on the dirt road after the road grader grades the road just before or after a good rain. Rain and road grading don't mix, the loose dirt turns to slick mud.

THE RIDE FROM HELL---------I started out the other day and I came to the low spot. Suddenly, to my surprise, the muddy spot I am in is a mile long - YIKES! You guessed it, the road grader went thru the day before, and it rained over night and the low spot was a mess. The mud was anywhere from a 1/4 inch to 3 inches deep, complete with ruts in the really bad spots, and very, very slick.

PUCKER UP AND GO-----------I made the split decision to mush on, since stopping or turning around on a downhill grade in the mud on a very narrow country lane seemed out of the question. I was in second gear and knew that speed was both a friend and a foe and had to be managed very carefully. I drew on my experiences from ice and snow driving (not on a bike) and bike riding on gravel. I knew staying straight and level was critical, but avoiding the ruts and really bad spots was also important if I was going to get thru the next mile upright. I put half of my weight on the foot pegs, took my hands off of the clutch and front brake and was very gentle with the throttle and steering input. Away I went, I kept a steady speed and tried to stay away from the worst spots, At times, the rear wanted to slide out from under me and at times the front wanted to take a different path then me, both had to be managed while keeping my speed up enough so I had enough momentum to not spin out and come to a stop in the mud. When the rear started sliding I guess I used counter steering, when the front wanted to take a different path (i.e. caught a rut), I, for the most part, let it until I could gently work it back to the center of the road. There were at least 5 times when I thought I had lost it but managed to hold on. When I finally got to the paved road I put the kick stand down and just sit there exhausted watching the mud drip off the new Wing.

I hope you enjoyed this little tale, and maybe someone might learn something from it.

Happy Riding,
Elk Man

P. S. I put up with the above to live here.
 

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The road to our farm is like that, three miles long with the middle mile the worse, when dry like very fine sand and when wet like a very sticky clay, together with slight hills and curves. Never had one of my current bikes up there. Sometimes wish I still had my old 1972 Honda 450 SL, now that bike was fun to ride on that road :D
 

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We only had 1/4 mile of dirt/mud/gravel road when I built our first house in 1980. You could not see another light from our house at night. In 1985 the road was placed in the county system and maintained fairly well with gravel (as much as I hate gravel - even for cages to run on). Then in about 1997 a neighbor sub-divides his pastureland and now I live on a two-lane blacktop with a subdivision surrounding me! Your poblems sound like heaven, NOT hell!
 

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now I live on a two-lane blacktop with a subdivision surrounding me! Your poblems sound like heaven, NOT hell!
Wow! Let's see: privacy, no lights, quiet at the cost of a little mud and dust. No contest! Thanks for the perspective. Sorry about the subdivision.
 
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