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Discussion Starter #1
From what I have seen, the Hurt Report, and a recent study on motorcycle accidents in Thailand (lots of bikes over there) the missing skill that allows accidents to happen is not threshold braking, high speed cornering, or the ability to drag your pegs around an orange cone. The missing skill is the ability (or the habit) of LOOKING WELL AHEAD OF THE BIKE.

When speed and vision conspire such that riders see only FIVE SECONDS in front of the bike, bad things happen. With that little bit of time, skill is useless. Front brake versus rear brake, doesn't matter. Swerve first then brake, or brake first and then swerve, no difference. In the real world, five seconds just isn't enough time see what is happening, comprehend the danger, consider possible action, then choose and execute the appropriate evasive action correctly. Not enough time.

The solution is not better bike control skills. The solution is more time by learning to use vision correctly and getting in the HABIT of looking at LEAST five seconds, and much better TEN SECONDS ahead of the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks, GL.

My suggestion for developing the HABIT of looking well ahead of the bike is a game I call Time Travel. Look up to the vanishing point. Pick a landmark, such as a tree, rock, fence or sign, at that point and start counting up. See how long it takes you in seconds to reach that landmark.

Any time your vision is less than 10 seconds in front of the bike means it is time to slow down. The goal of the game is to see how many seconds ahead you can see. My best "time" is 1 minute 70 seconds on a highway in South Carolina. For me, most rural roads (including The Dragon) are 30-40 seconds.

The benefit of playing Time Travel is having a fun way to develop the HABIT of looking well ahead of the bike. Just don't forget to REACT to what you see by slowing down, moving over, or watching out for that guy in the truck who looks like he's begging to get in an accident.
 

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Thanks, GL.

My best "time" is 1 minute 70 seconds on a highway in South Carolina. For me, most rural roads (including The Dragon) are 30-40 seconds.
I'm not trying to be a smart ass. But 1 minute 70 seconds???????????? is that like TWO minutes TEN seconds. I dunno maybe I slept in that day in math:wink2:

Also, there are parts of the dragon that 30-40 seconds would require x-ray vision to see through the granite.

I get your point, but I don't follow your "personal best" Or the dragon scenario.

Bottom line I gather is LOOK AHEAD……...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I get your point, but I don't follow your "personal best" on the dragon scenario.
You are right, RoadKing100: I should have said my personal best ever is 2:10, but as I counted it, I thought of it as 1:70. :shrug:

Right again on the Dragon. PARTS of the Dragon are 30-40 seconds. Big chunks of it are more like 5-10 seconds, as shown in this video (not me by the way--but Gary J did a nice job).

As a 5-10 second road at normal speed, with lots of accidents when folks push it faster than that, I feel like the research is looking pretty solid. Get below a 5 second sight line and bad things start to happen. Of course that's also part of the fun. Darned tricky stuff, aye?

 

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It's not always what's ahead. For me, intersections are what will get most of us, and at those it is 360*. Did I ever tell you about the time this big hawk was carrying a rabbit out of the river bed and over the bridge I was riding my...............
 

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Surviving on a motorcycle is the same as surviving in a fighter jet, or as a cop, or on a football field, or walking down the street - it's knowing what's going on around you and anticipating coming events. It's called Situational Awareness; something that far too many people are unfamiliar with as they simply don't pay attention to what's s going on around them. If you don't know what's going on around you then you can't anticipate a coming life threatening event. Situational Awareness = Staying Alive
 
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