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Very interesting. Seems we really do have our lives in our hands.
 

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I believe as the state's populations increase and the number of unendorsed riders in each state increases, that the number of fatalities will increase as well.

Safety campaigns are lacking, as we all know. And I am all for the increase in the safety factors to increase the awareness of motorcyclist in and on the staes higway system.

The survey also addresses the problem with motorcycle dealers requiring riders to show they have the motorcyle endorsment before ever riding off into the sunset, without proper endorsement on the license. Taking responsibility for motorcycles sold to customers who have no training whatsoever.

I can only hope that this is implimented into our present day system.

Thanks for posting this!
 

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I think the "single vehicle" stats are Very flawed. I know in my wreck in 03, the car that cut me off, and ultimately caused my demise that day, just kept going. Also true in Red's summertime mishap.

These ignorant cagers don't even realize what they've done.

Sure, they were considered single vehicle wrecks, but the main contributing factor has left the scene.
 

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Mr B I was thinking the same thing. When I was driving Big Rigs I was taught if a vehicle ran me off the road, to take part of it with me. Otherwise the state and insurance would say I fell asleep. It's sad to think I was being taught to possible injure or worse another vehicle because I needed to CYA... I guess the same is true with a cage, maybe just enough contact to cause the driver to stop and look at the boot scuff on his paint......
 

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MR b's demise

MR b,
sorry to hear of your DEMISE. :shock: Are you posting from the other side? :roll:
the hobo
 

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Bluebaird said:
http://www.dol.wa.gov/about/reports/mototaskforce.pdf
If you die on your bike chances are it was your fault!
I never think twice about riding motorcycles or flying small planes. I know the danger involved and prepare myself to drive defensively.

There are people, young and old, who do not care about you as a motorist or human being. You have to do everything in your power to be vigilant, aware, and prepared to come off the bike if necessary. Dress appropriately, keep your eyes up, and enjoy your lives.

Keep the greasy side down........
 

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What about the MOPEDS??? They are the ones that run up the accident rate as most states they do not require a m/c license endorment .
You read in the newspaper and tv news all the time ,kids as well as adults run the stop signs,etc
When you see an old man riding down the road at turtle speed,or kids flying at sonic boom speed, I think to myself,Hope he/she does not make to news tonite.
Sad but true and there is nothing we can do about it unless we the people outlaw them like the old 3 wheelers atv's.
So the bottom line ,these figures will keep rising.
edmund
 

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More empty stats. Although I think raw data is good I would like to find out the reason for the group that compiles the data. There is a list of who was on the task force but as far as who collected/compiled data...

This task force included members of motorcycle rider groups and state agency representatives, including the public safety agencies, the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Health. The task force adopted the following goal as the primary guide for its work:
Task Force Goal: To determine primary causes for motorcycle collisions and crashes, and provide recommendations that will reduce fatalities or serious injuries.
Executive Summary The task force spent its early meetings reviewing information that had been compiled from a set of databases kept by state agencies. This information formed the basis of the recommendations that emerged from the group.
So the task force worked from data "compiled from a set of databases kept by state agencies".
Found a couple of items interesting...
• DOL should seek a partnership with motorcycle dealers to discourage the practice of allowing unendorsed purchasers to ride a newly purchased bike from their lots.
• Motorcycle groups should encourage endorsement for participation in organized riding events.
When I bought my wing I had to show insurance and license. No, this wasn't a requirement of my lending institution I did not finance. I have never been asked to show a license at any event for motorcycles.

Now for really off the cuff (showing warped logic applied to data) :eek:
A third of fatalities were motorcyclists who did not have a valid motorcycle endorsement.
So that means two thirds did making it twice as likely to a motorcycle fatality if you have a valid motorcycle endorsement :shock:
Page 9 has a bar graph titled Common Contributing Factors in Motorcycle Fatalities and in it shows approx 52% were speeding and only 3-4% were failing to obey (signs, signals or officers). So how does Washington indentify speed limits? Does it line up those doing community service to yell it out to motorists? Here in MO we use signs so if I am speeding I am automatically not obeying the signs. :wink:

I know the last article of the AMA mag had an article about a new report to replace the HURT? report. It is just waiting on funding.[/b]
 

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Here is another B..... Sh... analysis that only looks at fatalities in one state. It is not abnormal with the price of gas going up that more people are ridding motorcycles and therfore accidents and fatalities are going to rise. There are contributing factors, this being the state of Washington were I reside, I can attest that there are exponential factors to overcome to be a safe rider. Cagers are the #1 danger. With the hilly and tree'd terrain your sight and distance for manuverability are far less. Our cagers here for some reason do a horrible job of dertermining how far a bike is and routinely pull out in front of you. I, being a graduate of the BRC twice and a rider of 35 years have been very lucky but also with my expierence have been a smart rider. I have avoided several accidents due extreem attention to surroundings. I ride aggressively occasionally on the back roads and have had a few close calls with the fog line. Our biggest problem in my opinion is that we have no reglated progression of bikes. First time buyers can buy the largest bike they can afford and thus are not expierenced to drive it. I believe that first time buyers should not be able to purchase anything bigger than 500cc's till they have a year of ridding under them.
R,
MadMan
 

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Bluebaird said:
http://www.dol.wa.gov/about/reports/mototaskforce.pdf
If you die on your bike chances are it was your fault!
I've known that for years... What else is new? Very seldom does something happen that you couldn't have seen coming if you're paranoid enough.. ;) Of course, sometimes it can be VERY difficult to focus on traffic, and we don't always recognize those times when we probably should be in the cage, whether it be fatigue, stress, or just absent-mindedness.. I've been lucky in a large respect; on the other other hand, the two bike accidents I've had (and the two times i fell down :oops: ) were both attributable to not thinking ahead.. When my son got his bike, I told him that controlling the bike properly was only part of the story.. Keeping his head up and out of his ass was the BIGGEST part of riding.. I've been reading the Proficient Motorcycling books over the holidays, and surprisingly enough, that same theme runs through and through the books..
 

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Question for the group - does your state issue license plates to the titled person of the bike when that person does not have a motorcycle endorsement?
 

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I haven't read this article completely but I tend to agree with it. I have always thought mostbike wrecks not all were caused by the rider. In our area last May we had 5 deaths and all I believe were the riders fault. On one incident of a bad motorcycle wreck, this one the rider didn't die, the news interviewed the kid and he couldn't quit talking about how the car driver pulled out in front of him, towards the end of the interview they were walking around the kids bike, a crotchrocket, him on a cane, and he finally let it slip that he was doing between 125 and 145 mph inside a town. Maybe the car saw him but didn't realize the closing rate.JMO
 

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Discussion Starter #16
MichMike said:
Question for the group - does your state issue license plates to the titled person of the bike when that person does not have a motorcycle endorsement?
No license or endorsment needed to get title or tags :roll:
 

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The oblivious & that study......

I would have to agree that many of the “singe vehicle” incidences where due to an oblivious cage cutting off the bike. I have had a large number of close calls and every one of them, I try to let the (&(^%^ know I was there and if possible, let them see what almost happened. I also sit on the horn until there is a fair amount of distance between us. I also sort of agree about taking a piece of the vehicle that caused the problem if I am going down.



I also find this to be very fitting…..
----------------


Just a Biker

I saw you; hug your purse closer to you in the grocery store line.
You didn't see me put an extra $10.00 in the collection plate last
Sunday.
I saw you; pull your child closer when we passed each other on the
sidewalk.
You didn't see me playing Santa at the local mall.
I saw you; change your mind about going into the restaurant.
You didn't see me attending a meeting to raise more money for the
hurricane relief.
I saw you, roll up your window and shake your head when I rode by
You didn't see me, driving behind you when you flicked your cigarette
butt out the car window.
I saw you, frown at me when I smiled at your children.
You didn't see me, when I took time off from work to run toys to the
homeless.
I saw you, stare at my long hair.
You didn't see me and my friends cut ten inches off for Locks of Love.
I saw you roll your eyes at our leather coats and gloves.
You didn't see me and my brothers donate our old coats and gloves to
those that had none.
I saw you; look in fright at my tattoos.
You didn't see me cry as my children were born and having their name
tattooed on my skin and in my heart.
I saw you change lanes while rushing off to go somewhere.
You didn't see me going home to be with my family.
I saw you complain about how loud and noisy our bikes can be.
You didn't see me, when you were changing the CD and drifted into my
lane.
I saw you, yelling at your kids in the car.
You didn't see me; pat my child's hands knowing he was safe behind me.
I saw you, reading the newspaper or map as you drove down the road.
You didn't see me; squeeze my wife's leg when she told me to take the
next turn.
I saw you, race down the road in the rain.
You didn't see me, get soaked to the skin so my son could have the car
to go on his date.
I saw you; run the yellow light just to save a few minutes of time.
You didn't see me, trying to turn right.
I saw you; cut me off because you needed to be in the lane I was in.
You didn't see me, leave the road.
I saw you, waiting impatiently for my friends to pass.
You didn't see me. I wasn't there.
I saw you; go home to your family.
You didn't see me, because, I died that day you cut me off.
I was just a biker and a person with friends and family.
You didn't see me.
PLEASE PASS THIS ON FOR YOUR FRIENDS WHO RIDE OR had someone WHO MAY
HAVE DIED WHILE RIDING A MOTORCYCLE.
Also for those who feel the same
way as above about the biker. Pass this on. .. lets
help make people
aware!!


Author unknown
 

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joe_flash said:
Bluebaird said:
http://www.dol.wa.gov/about/reports/mototaskforce.pdf
If you die on your bike chances are it was your fault!
I've known that for years... What else is new? Very seldom does something happen that you couldn't have seen coming if you're paranoid enough.. ;) Of course, sometimes it can be VERY difficult to focus on traffic, and we don't always recognize those times when we probably should be in the cage, whether it be fatigue, stress, or just absent-mindedness.. I've been lucky in a large respect; on the other other hand, the two bike accidents I've had (and the two times i fell down :oops: ) were both attributable to not thinking ahead.. When my son got his bike, I told him that controlling the bike properly was only part of the story.. Keeping his head up and out of his ass was the BIGGEST part of riding.. I've been reading the Proficient Motorcycling books over the holidays, and surprisingly enough, that same theme runs through and through the books..
I agree. Whatever you think of the stats, one theme runs through
virtually every study I've seen. You can't eliminate all the risk, but you
can exponentially reduce it. The VAST majority of accidents are
avoidable if you know what you're doing and your head is in the game.
I ALWAYS look at myself before I blame a cager. We do have control
here, folks.
 

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While I agree that some crashes are due to another vehicle who left the scene, the other perspective is - can you see it coming and prevent it?

Let's start with this perspective: On the highway, we are at the bottom of the food chain. Not only do we need to be on top of our game, we must be able to predict the flaws of other vehicles. Just my perspective, but in any touching of vehicles out there, we stand to lose.

I can't tell you how many times I have allowed for other cagers to make a mistake and 1 - was not disappointed and 2 - was prepared for it.

Those who have not seen the pages on my website on how fast a crash can happen may now want to take a look, as well as read the article 'Is Your Radar On?' I wrote the radar article before MSF started incorporating the ides of Rider Radar in the new BRC.

What I really found interesting was the comparison between the Oregon program and the Washington program. Looks like MSF is not the only game in town anymore, and there is a better way of presenting a motorcycle safety program. See page 17, first bullet. I've long felt that the new MSF program has dummied down the classroom. Just allowing students to look up answers to questions teaches nothing, as all they have learned is how to pass a written test instead of how to apply the knowledge.
 

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Hmmm, well, according to this study, if I wait till I turn age 66, ride only at night under wet weather conditions, during the months from October through March, I should be fine!!! Statistically, anyway.

Whew! I feel much better now.

LOL.

Mac
 
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