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After having a look at a friend's Wing I realize that my throttle no longer 'snaps' back to idle but rather takes a moment or so. Therefore I want to clean and lubricate the throttle cable.

I searched this forum and came up with one GOOD THREAD.

Okay, I'll take apart the throttle cables at the handlebar and spray something down the cables to clean them. But I have two questions:
1. What kind of cable cleaner/lube is best? (I'm not a big WD-40 fan)
2. Is there going to be a problem with the residue that seeps (or is forced) out the bottom end? It will just pool on the engine and then burn off won't it?

I should have done this last week when I had the bike apart for the air cleaner change.
 

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Occasionally it is postulated that the coble sheaths have teflon liners and thus need no lube. I dunno, I have not been in there. Even if the cables are PTFE encased, the hand throttle assembly may get sluggish. I would think a product like DuPont Triflow (tefelon based) would be about ideal. Mine still runs as smooth as glass and I have not "fixed" it - yet. I think Fred has made some suggestions in previous posts, but can't remember for certain.

prs
 
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John I use a cable luber like the motion pro. (Princess Auto has a cheepie for a couple bucks) If you have aftermarket grips make sure they are not rubbing against the throttle cable housing or that the end of the grip isn't bottomed out on the bar at the end .
If you do lube them there is "special" cable lube available at you local stealer, in a pinch wd-40 does do the trick . Just don't get carried away with spraying , the little bit that comes out the other end should be harmless . I listen for a change in the sound of the lube going in to know when to stop .
You also may want to make sure the inside grip housing is REAL nice and clean including the bars . One other thing that is common, is a misrouted or binding cable . When you put your bike back together make sure the cables are not restricted or distorted at all .

Hope this helps. :)
 

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From my notes:
Throttle Cable Lubrication (long)

Posted By: Jim Hyatt <[email protected]>
Date: 2/13/2003 at 20:55:44


I am sure most of you figured this out before I was weened. If there is just one person
struggling then read on.

I have nearly 1K on the Wing and have not liked the throttle "feel" from day one. I asked my
service mgr. to check it and he said it was OK. I guess so, it felt just like all of the others in
the show room.

I was still unhappy. I took the throttle housing apart and couldn't find an easy way to release
the "on" cable. That thing is threaded into the housing and you can't pull it loose without
releasing the other end. I have a cable oiling tool that works with aerosol spray lube. To use it
you must release one end of the cable.

Today, two weeks later, I have success.

If your throttle feels stiff or will not SNAP to "off" from full "on" chances are your cables
need oiling. Below is what I did.

First if you have a cable oiler tool, save it for use later. Mine will not work on the Wing.

1. Remove the screws holding the throttle housing together. Remove the screw holding the
upper half to the bar.
2. As I said above the "on" cable is threaded into the housing. This makes it impossible to
gain access to the cable end. Just down the cable from the end is an adjustment point. Unscrew
this section until you can see the cable inside.
3. The next step can get messy. Cover the work area with a towel or plastic film.
4. Cable lube, I use "Chain Wax", comes with a hollow straw for application. Inset this straw
into the lower cable section.
5. Wrap plastic film material, I used a Wal-Mart bag, tightly around the straw and both halves
of the adjustment section. Hold the plastic tight with your fingers. Spray the lube a few seconds
or until you hear oil spraying from the other end. Some oil will go back to the throttle housing.
6. Put the two halves back together and screw them all the way up. You will need this slack for
the other cable.
7. Remove the lock nut from the "off" cable. Hold the throttle full off and remove the cable
from the retainer. Remove the cable from the housing.
8. Insert the lube straw into the end of the cable and apply oil just as before.
9. reinstall this cable. Be sure to put the lock nut on NOW.
10. Wipe up any excess oil inside the throttle housing halves. Reinstall the screw for the upper
throttle housing. Reassemble the throttle housing halves with the two screws.
11. Adjust the "on" cable adjuster to remove excess slack.

IMPORTANT
Check the throttle for "snap back" by opening the throttle to full and releasing. Do this at full
left, center and full right. The throttle should "snap" off without any drag. Finally idle the
engine until "warm" idle speed is reached. Swing the bars from full left to full right. The idle
speed should remain constant.
 

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Actually, lubing the throttle cables on this bike is easier than doing it on most other bikes, because you can easily remove the starboard handlebar.

I will use FSM terminology for the following instructions (my bike is in my signature):

1. Remove the meter panel.

2. Remove the handlebar center cover (two #2 Phillips screws).

3. Hold the starboard handlebar end weight and remove the mounting screw (#3 Phillips) and the weight.

4. Remove the two screws (#2 Phillips) from the right handlebar switch housing.

5. Remove the screw (#2 Phillips - I use an offset screwdriver), and the setting plate that are inside the right handlebar switch housing. You may want to remove the brake lever for better access.

6. Release the throttle cables from the handlebar clamp (on the handlebar setting plate).

7. Remove the two screws (#2 Phillips) from the starboard handlebar plate. Remove the handlebar plate.

8. Remove the starboard handlebar mounting bolts (14 mm socket). Turn the handlebars right for better access.

9. Remove the throttle grip and pipe assy from the handlebar (pull off of the end) and disconnect the throttle cables from the throttle grip flange. (Because the handlebar can come off, you don't need to disconnect the throttle cables from the throttle-body assy - good news!)

10. Temporarily install the starboard handlebar in place with the two big bolts (14mm wrench). This is to keep it out of the way.

11. You can easily gain access to the cables now in order to properly use a cable-lube tool (the kind that hooks up to a can of cable lube spray) (lots of sources, including Motion Pro. Mine is old, says "YAMAHA" on it.).

12. To reinstall, follow the instructions in your FSM labeled: "RIGHT HANDLBAR INSTALLATION."

Sorry, no pics.......just reciting some notes I took when I did this job the first time.
 

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Could not get a good link but Petrochem makes a kit with the luber and Cable Life lube. Have used this stuff for many many years. Here is a link from Parts Unlimited catalog. Any dealer should be able to order this
http://street.parts-unlimited.com/36/109/4076328
 

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Pigeon Roost said:
Occasionally it is postulated that the coble sheaths have teflon liners and thus need no lube. I dunno, I have not been in there. Even if the cables are PTFE encased, the hand throttle assembly may get sluggish. I would think a product like DuPont Triflow (tefelon based) would be about ideal. Mine still runs as smooth as glass and I have not "fixed" it - yet. I think Fred has made some suggestions in previous posts, but can't remember for certain.

prs
Ditto. I haven't actually cut into one, but I understand them to have a Teflon sheath inside. If this is indeed true, you really shouldn't need to lube them, though some lube on the throttle mechanism itself wouldn't hurt. Anytime I remove the gas tank, I also try to hit the throttle return springs on the throttle body assy with some spray lube as well as the end of the cables and the moving parts in the mechanism. Lubing the upper ends around the throttle grip wouldn't be a bad idea, just be sure to use a light viscosity lube that won't gum up.

I would advise you NOT use WD40 on anything you are trying to lube, as it really is not a good lubricant. Liquid Wrench makes a teflon laced spray lube that I like, and there are other good spray lube products out there as well. WD40 is good for removing moisture and cleaning, but it doesn't leave a lubricating film, which is what you need here.
 

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i just did mine took some time used the straw on the end of the nozzle
did a little at a time not to go all over the place
does seem to work better use a lube for cables not to attract dirt
asked the dealer to do this they wanted to sell me new cables and install
500. labor 71. parts!!!
 

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I have an 02 Wing(with extended warranty) that had the sticking throttle problem. I took it to the dealer two times and they lubed the cable. It kept sticking and it was replaced under warranty.
 

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Sluggish Throttle Return

Hi John. You've gotten lots of advice on lubing the cables. The throttle cables do have a teflon inner lining and should not need lubrication to work properly. I would check other, simpler things first.

You stated that you just replaced the air filter. Is it possible you somehow repositioned the throttle cables when you did this? Even good cables will bind if they are routed incorrectly.

Check your throttle grip. Is it touching either the throttle cable housing or the handlebar end weight? It should do neither. It should move freely in and out between those two immoveable objects at least 1/16". The inner sleeve under the throttle grip can also wear in the cable housing causing this slow throttle return. Splitting the cable housing covers allows you to examine this.

Finally, if all of these things are good, then the cable is binding because the inner teflon lining has probably worn through in one place. Lubing it only buys you some time. Both the cables should be replaced if this is so. It is far better to spend some money and be safe than to have your throttle bind one day and have a crash as a result.

This board has a lot of members who like to find their own sollutions for problems that don't involve money, and that's OK as far as it goes. But lubing a worn cable is a "band-aid" fix at best. If the cables are truly worn, then replacing them is the only sure way to have no problems down the road. Your call, ride safe and Happy Holidays!
 
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Wow , considering this original post is just about a year old , there sure has been a lot of replies !
I think John has his ride lubed and many miles already behind him since he posted this , actually I know he has . :D

PMS , sure gives one a lot more puter time :wink:
 

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Fred H. said:
Ditto. I haven't actually cut into one, but I understand them to have a Teflon sheath inside. If this is indeed true, you really shouldn't need to lube them, though some lube on the throttle mechanism itself wouldn't hurt.....

....I would advise you NOT use WD40 on anything you are trying to lube, as it really is not a good lubricant. Liquid Wrench makes a teflon laced spray lube that I like, and there are other good spray lube products out there as well. WD40 is good for removing moisture and cleaning, but it doesn't leave a lubricating film, which is what you need here.
Fred,

Good advice on cable lubes. I personally have been using Tri-Flow for a while (because I always have some on the shelf, more than any other reason) without any apparent problems.

As to the need to lube the throttle cables, Chapter 3 (MAINTENANCE) of my 2001-2005 FSM says,

"If the throttle grip does not return properly, lubricate the throttle cables and overhaul and lubricate the throttle grip housing.

For cable lubrication, disconnect the throttle cables at their upper ends. Thoroughly lubricate the cables and their pivot points with a commercially available cable lubricant or a lightweight oil.


I lube the throttle cables on my modern bikes mainly from habit (I once busted a throttle cable on my '81 GL1800 back in the '80's out in the boonies in the Republic of Korea. Thus began a long and terrible saga I shan't go into here :shock: ).
 
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