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I'm just full of questions today. Anyway I will be replacing my tires soon with Metzelers. I read somewhere about a liquid that gets put into the tire that is SUPPOSED to help with better balancing. Can anyone give me an idea what this stuff is and/or is the whole thing just poppycock.
 

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tire balance

I tend to not do stuff to the bike that is difficult to undo so, for myself, I don't think I would go the liquid in the tire route. You can get an excellent stainless steel motorcycle tire balancing kit on Ebay for about $60. In the past I didn't bother with balancing but now that tires have gotten so freaking expensive I thought I probably should start balancing them. The bike is so much smoother I can hardly believe it is the same bike ('05 wing). I got the balancer I mentioned above and use the adhesive weights (a local tire shop gave me enough of them to last the life of the bike, for free). Try it, I'm sure you will like it............TC
 

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Some tire manufacturers will not warranty a tire if liquid junk has been introduced. Nothing but air.

Also, some of those miracle fluids will eat up your aluminum wheel, quicker than you can say "Howdy Doodie".

Bulldog
 

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Bulldog said:
Also, some of those miracle fluids will eat up your aluminum wheel, quicker than you can say "Howdy Doodie".

Bulldog
Dang! :shock: That's quick :!:
 

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Am I wrong in assuming the dealer/tire vendor is supposed to balance the tires when mounting new ones??
 

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uncletheoden said:
Am I wrong in assuming the dealer/tire vendor is supposed to balance the tires when mounting new ones??
You should always clarify that point before getting new tires installed!
 

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uncletheoden said:
Am I wrong in assuming the dealer/tire vendor is supposed to balance the tires when mounting new ones??
Only if you tell them to do it and pay extra.
 

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Tire balancing

Most tire manufacturers do not care what kind of balancing liquid or forign material you put in your tires as long as it not the reason or contribute to the reason the tire failed. If the tire failed because of an unrelated factor you can get by with it. Balancing liquids of various kinds and formulas have been around for a very long time.
 

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Bulldog, Looks like you are in trouble on # 1. :(

All of us are in trouble on # 2 :(

WHAT IS NOT COVERED

# 1 Spinning, as in mud snow, sand, on ice.

# 2 Tires used in racing, other competition, (or in excess of legal speed limits.)
 

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Tires

Yes I'm sure. If the material added did not contribute to the cause of failure there is no way warrenty may be refused legitimately. A dealer if he wants to play hard ball then could give you a hard time but with Goodyear company owned stores it is rare. At one time Goodyear was selling a form of liquid balancer for truck tires. I always thought the same as you but Goodyear engineers OK'd the stuff as long as it did not alter or damage the tire. We still add a dry form of balancer upon request. I warranty Goodyear tires all the time with ointments, salves, jellys, BB's marbles and all maner of stuff in um and as long as the additive had no influence or in no way contribute to the failure, then it's OK to warrenty. Goodyear owns Dunlop and the warrenty for both company's is nearly the same. I've worked for Goodyear for just shy of 40 years. Some folks swear by that stuff but I don't think it makes that much difference but that is just my opinion. I havent balanced a motorcycle tire on my own bike for the past 20 years. If you get a vibration or ride disturbance from a freshly mounted motorcycle tire then I would replace the tire. Here again, it's just my opinion.
 

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Just do the job the right way. Its not rocket science. Hall will sell ya a balance stand and some extra weights.

prs
 

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There is some BS flying low today!

A fluid inside the wheel may help a little (i doubt any at all) to correct ballance. I would suggest any fluid knowingly put in any tyre bike/car/truck is there to aid(stop) slow deflation from a puncture by nail or screw or such. I personnaly have fluid fitted to all my bikes (as i dont carry a spare).

I have Ultra seal as found here:-

http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/home1.htm#currentPageTarget

Go read and make your own decision

Nigel Fenton
 

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Bulldog said:
I found this in the FAQ area of the warranty and thought it was interesting:

Can I have my motorcycle tires repaired?


Some punctures in motorcycle tires can be repaired if no other damage is present. Dunlop recommends only individual permanent plug-patch repairs of small tread area punctures from within the demounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an innertube as a substitute for a proper repair. Your bike should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after the repair and the repaired tire should never be used over 80 mph. Dunlop speed ratings are voided by repairs.

No form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by the penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair that may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by the penetrating object. Reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.
 

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Sealant

What they are worried about using sealants is you may need to have a tire fixed and not know it because the sealant may stop the escape of air temporarilly. A repair done right will allow you to return the tire to service whereas a temorary repair might allow the tire to seperate later and you will loose your tire. I know lots of folks will plug a tire and run it out with no problems but there have been some have had a tire fail later unessarily. Any tire that has a forign object penetrate the air chamber should be repaired from the inside period, no exceptions. The person doing the repair has to look at the liner on the inside and cover the injury with a reinforced repair. Now I carry rope plugs and a small compressor to get me home but then dismounted and fixed from the inside if possible. Some injuries cannot be fixed. The closer the middle, the better the fix. We won't fix repairs in the shoulder of the tire because that's where the belts end or in the sidewall. I use the rope type as a temporary as it will conform better to the shape of the injury. Plugs work on round holes but don't work so well on cuts.




We use this type repair called a umbrella patch. The long stem is pulled through the hole from the inside until the patch is flush with the liner and covers the injury completely. The long stem is to protect the hole and not allow any water or moisture to reach the casing cord. The round part of the patch not only seals the hole but adds strength to the area surrounding the injury. Even using a patch without the stem is better than a plug from the outside.
 

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Have someone index your tires. That is, spin the tire and note the weight needed, deflate the tire and rotate 90 degrees, reinflate, etc. every 90 degrees is all you need. This will enable you to find the least amount of weight needed to balance. It's a pain to do, but it has always removed the woble from regular dealership mount & balance.
 

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Deep,

You are correct, but if you are having it done commercially, how many are willing to pay for this service?

Bulldog
 

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Sounds like an implausibe task if you are having your tires done at a dealership. I do that at home with a static balancer and it goes very easily since I have my wheel marked for a known temporary wheel weight that puts the rim itself in balance. Then I have to do is rotate the tire on the rim before setting the beads so that the tire's actual light spot corresponsds with the wheel's known heavy spot. I typically get excellent balance, statically, with very litte and sometimes no added weight.

But is static balance all that accurate anyway. Where did Nigelf go? Or, BullDog, you are a pro; what is the 411 on that? Pro's and Con's of static and/or dynamic balance.

prs
 

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from Dunlop Warranty---
not covered

Tires injected with dry/liquid balancers or sealants, or in which anything other than air has been used as the support medium.
 
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