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Changed my rear tire for the first time by tipping the bike on it's right side and it was a bear. The old tire was hard to pull out and when I did the rear dropped some and had to jack up back to get the new tire on. Do I have to shim the rear bottom of engine while it's laying down or what is the proper procedure. Don't think I will do that again unless there is something else you do than just tip it on it's side. It wasn't too bad lifting it back up but was hard enough. Did it by myself with my butt against the seat and pushing it up with my legs. Not something I would want to do every day. Anyone got a better way. I have a hitch on the back and figured this would be quick and dirty. Turns out it was mostly dirty. Jim
 

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Geeze, that seems like a lot more work and definately more risky than just removing it the conventional way. Straight out the back. Remove the hitch, if you need too.

I'd be real nervous about tipping the bike over to the extreem you are describing. I'd be sure to scrape or dent something.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Daveo, It's really no problem tipping the bike over. Just set some pads or rugs down under each tipover bar and slowly lower the bike using your hip against the seat and use your legs to lower the bike. Hands on the handlebars. Make sure the bike is in gear. It rests on the two bars and nothing else. To lift back up have your back to the bike, squat and put your butt against the seat, one hand on handlebar other on the seat handle and push against bike with your legs. The bike comes right up. The bad part about taking the tire off and putting it back on is the tire is also resting on the ground and when you take the lug nuts off the bike settles down some more making it hard to take the tire off and put the new one on. I probably will go out the back next time as this really isn't any easier. But you never know until you try it. And it was a good confidence builder knowing I can lift the bike back up if it falls down. Jim
 

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Tried it once and didn't find it any easier (actually harder). I know it's probably tough to pull the hitch, but a center stand is handy and works without the extra danger of heriating something. A screw or bottle jack will get the front one off.
 
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Sear's lift would be better...

I bought a Sear's lift jack and find it quite adequate for the Goldwing. With cautionary use and the supplied straps one can safely lift the Wing high enough so the rear tire can be changed out. I would gladly spend the $60 for the lift than go thru the hassle of removing the rear fender/hitch or laying the heavy lady down on her side. :wrong:
 

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Rear Tire Replacement

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00950190000P

there is a lil trick to lift the wing on one of these, the rear support is under the pivot point of the center stand, I have two small blocks of wood, 3/4 x 1 1/2 of an inch that go on either side of the rib under the front lift leg, to the bottom of the motor, it stops the warbble. leave the tire on the ground and loosen the lugs, an extra foot helps on the brake, be careful not to roll the bike with the leaverage. jack it up and the wheel will come out, sometimes a lil angle to the left helps. replace and hand tighten the lugs, when back on the ground torque the lugs, that extra foot will help again, Ray
 

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Laying the GL1800 down to change tires

I do it all the time. But by putting a floor jack under the right leg of the center stand, with the center stand up. I lay the front crash bar on a piece of 2 X 6 on edge as I lay it down. Lug nuts are already loose.
If need be pump the jack a couple of times to lift rear of bike a little.
Pull the tire out and slip in the new one and hand tighten a couple of lug nuts and set it back up and then up on the center stand. Finish tightening the lug nuts and your done. Maybe 10 minutes.
Easier yet with a trailer hitch. I still rest on the 2 X 6 in the front and slip the jack under the nut on the ball of the trailer hitch and raise it just enough to make the wheel change.
Much easier and faster than dismantling the rear of the bike and trailer hitch to get the tire and rim out.
 

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Tire change with Sears Lift

I also use a Sears lift because I don't want the hassle of removing the center hitch frame and the radio amplifier on my '08. I stabilize the bike once I have the lugs loosened and the Wing up on the second notch of the lift. I place a jackstand under the trailer hitch, and then lift the front wheel with a floor jack to put some weight on the jackstand. This steadies the Wing and eliminates any wobble.
 

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Rear Tire

I am with Farmer Jack. I have large carpet in the shop, lay the wing on its side and put a jack under the trailer ball. It just takes a little bit of lift to get the tire off. I have a V1 Bushtec so it would be a big job to remove the hitch.

I know a shop that when they do the frame inspection on the bottom of the bike, they lay them completely on the side. Bike will rest on the crash bars and the handle bar and the plastic does not touch.
 

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If you are talking about removing the rear wheel (with tire on it), set the bike on its center stand, remove the back tupperware, unbolt the wheel, work it off the studs, then roll it straight back. Ten minute job. Check Fred's DVD.
 

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Get Fred's DVD collection as he goes in detail about how to change out the rear the easy way. Plus a whole lot more. Check out his post above, ^, for the web site. Best money I've ever spent aside from a buddy that PDFed a manual for the GL1500.

Ride Free
Bobalou
 

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If you are talking about removing the rear wheel (with tire on it), set the bike on its center stand, remove the back tupperware, unbolt the wheel, work it off the studs, then roll it straight back. Ten minute job. Check Fred's DVD.
Not if you have a trailor hitch. Read the post.
 

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With the 06 and up there is an amplifier right behind the wheel. It is a pain to get off in addition to the trailer hitch and then it needs to be held up out of the way. The wires for it go up under the seat. None of it is hard just slow. I use a jack at home if I had to do it on the road I would lay it over.
 

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Daveo, It's really no problem tipping the bike over. Just set some pads or rugs down under each tipover bar and slowly lower the bike using your hip against the seat and use your legs to lower the bike. Hands on the handlebars. Make sure the bike is in gear. It rests on the two bars and nothing else. To lift back up have your back to the bike, squat and put your butt against the seat, one hand on handlebar other on the seat handle and push against bike with your legs. The bike comes right up. The bad part about taking the tire off and putting it back on is the tire is also resting on the ground and when you take the lug nuts off the bike settles down some more making it hard to take the tire off and put the new one on. I probably will go out the back next time as this really isn't any easier. But you never know until you try it. And it was a good confidence builder knowing I can lift the bike back up if it falls down. Jim

Ok I think I've got the picture. I've got Highway boards on the front engine guards that wouldn't like a 900 bike resting on them (at least not intentionally). It appears that others have done what you talked about as well.
 

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Sear's lift jack and find it quite adequate
jack the bike up pop both wheel's off take to shop
replace rubber pop both new wheel's back on
at same time take bike apart fill rear shock w/oil
pull gas tank tighten water clamp's add new power lines
to front for later use. reasemble bike ride it like you stoled it.
change air filter when you have it that far apart
 

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I've changed the rear twice using the tip-over method with no problem. It was evident when I laid it over that the tire needed to be lifted just a little to free it, so I extended the center stand and lifted the right foot of it with a jack about an inch - a 2X as a lever would have worked, also. Picking it back up was very easy using Paul's instructions from the videos linked in my sig. I really don't intend an insult here, but if this way is too hard to figure out, maybe you should take it to a shop.

Fred - I appreciate your caution, but how could you trust the bars to protect anything if not supporting the ~200 lbs that they feel at this angle? They are not supporting the entire weight of the bike or I sure would not be able to pick it back up!
 

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Ok I think I've got the picture. I've got Highway boards on the front engine guards that wouldn't like a 900 bike resting on them (at least not intentionally). It appears that others have done what you talked about as well.
Bartman just helped me last week to change the rear. Removed right side highway peg, bike on it's side. We were able to push the bike further over (one guy holding the other wrenching) so having 2 people made it a lot easier. No hassles, quick, easy and you don't have to worry about the lift, etc. Frankly I thought it was the way to go and Bartman made an important comment: good to know how to do this if you're stuck on the road with a flat etc. Breaker bar and a 19mm socket in the toolbag....good to go
 

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While on a trip recently, a friend had a tire seperation and we(three) tipped the bike over to remove and replace the wheel. We didn't lay it down, we just held it at an angle during removal and replacement. It worked fine, but I would not use it as a preferred method.

Donnie
 
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