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Discussion Starter #1
I had a problem getting my 175/60 dunlop put on.

The local Honda dealer would not mount it because it's a car tire.

I went to the truck tire shop my boss uses and they mounted it but could not balance it.

So I got some dyna beads for it.

Should the red dot on the tire line up with the valve stem ?
The tire shop mounted it 180 degrees from the valve stem.

Should I match up the dot with the valve stem before I put the beads in ?

Thanks
 

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tony308, I may get blasted over my reply, but here goes.

On the center stand tie the stand to the front wheel.

In 5th gear slowly bring up to 60-70 MPH. If there is much

or little vibration respond accordingly.

You may not need any beads but will not hurt to install.

OR return the MC SHOP for a regular balance.

Enjoy.
 

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Yep! Or near! But the beads may or should balance out.
 

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The valve stem on the rim is not necessarily the heavy spot. I have balanced several rims without the tires to find the heavy spot and it would be 5 or 6 inches one either side of the valve stem. I agree that the dynabeads would probably be the best choice. Some darksiders ride the CTs without any balancing at all and say they ride fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I got it upto 50 mph on the centrerstand and get a fairly big vibration.

Tomorrow I will take the wheel off and spin the tire around and check it
again.

I want to get it as close as I can before I put the beads in it.

Thanks for the advice.
 
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I believe the dot is just the speed rating - I have never balanced any bike tire and not any CT so far - I normally run them up to 90 and no shake so I don't bother - you can balance them for almost free if you wish.
Just go get a 3/4" rod and chuck it in the vise - slide the wheel on the rod and give it a very light nudge. the heavy spot will show itself if there is one but most of the time the tires are fine new but develop a heavy spot as they stretch.

I guess I have never used beads but if others who have say the work than I would say it's an option. I would use 8 oz of antifreeze myself just because it would be so free.
 

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The RED dot indicates the point of maximum force-variation (the highest point of the tire); it should be aligned with the point on the wheel that's physically lowest. Usually, wheel manufacturers will drill the valve-stem hole at the lowest point on the wheel, so you should align the red dot with the valve stem.


The YELLOW dot indicates the lightest part of the tire, also known as "maximum force variation." This should be lined up with the heaviest part of the wheel - typically, but not always, the valve stem. They call this "phase aligning" the tire.


 

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Discussion Starter #9
update

I took the tire off and got it remounted with the dot by the valve stem.
There was only a slight improvement in the vibration.
Put 3 ozs of beads in, and rode it.
No more vibration.

It handles as good as the bridgestone I took off.

Thanks to everyone for your advice and help.:bow:
 

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No dots of any color on the Kumho 195/55/16 that was just delivered to me this week from TireRack.
Must be a perfectly round tire???? Beads will be installed anyway.
 

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The RED dot indicates the point of maximum force-variation (the highest point of the tire); it should be aligned with the point on the wheel that's physically lowest. Usually, wheel manufacturers will drill the valve-stem hole at the lowest point on the wheel, so you should align the red dot with the valve stem.


The YELLOW dot indicates the lightest part of the tire, also known as "maximum force variation." This should be lined up with the heaviest part of the wheel - typically, but not always, the valve stem. They call this "phase aligning" the tire.


Bingo... You win first prize for the correct answer! :bow:
 

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chrisashbrook,
Thanks.
I try to be accurate in my answers
 

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I mounted a Dunlop SP Sport 5000 195/60 about a month ago. it had a yellow dot and about 13" away it had a red dot. not knowing which one to use for the balance, I called Tire Rack customer service and ask them about this. they said that these dots were used by there company for accounting and inventory purposes and had nothing to do with how to mount the tire. he said in the past that they were used to indicate how to mount the tire to get a better balance on the wheel but not any more. is this true???? bets the heck out of me, but i did mount this tire not paying any attention to the dots and adding the beads and it rides as good as any tire I have had.
 

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Doesn't say much for Tire Rack.
 

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The RED dot indicates the point of maximum force-variation (the highest point of the tire);

The YELLOW dot indicates the lightest part of the tire, also known as "maximum force variation."
So exactly what is the differance? Yellow dot, Red dot both mean the same thing...
 

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From http://www.nsxprime.com/FAQ/TireWheel/Balancing.htm

[FONT=Trebuchet MS, Arial, Helvetica]What Are Those Dots On The Sidewall?


[AWN] The red dot indicates the point of maximum force-variation; it should be aligned with the point on the wheel that's physically lowest.
Usually, wheel manufacturers will drill the valve-stem hole at the lowest point on the wheel, so you should align the red dot with the valve stem.
[GM] From the Yokohama booklet about the OEM AO22H1's that came with my car: The RED dot is to be used as the location for measuring tread wear. "When the indicators show, tires must be replaced."
The YELLOW dot indicates the lightest part of the tire, also known as "maximum force variation." This should be lined up with the heaviest part of the wheel - the valve stem. They call this "phase aligning" the tire.
[SS] The yellow spot (light) should be mounted on the heavy spot (valve stem) on the wheel. In which case the red dot would be the high point on the tire, and wear the fastest, indicating the need for replacement sooner that other places on the tread. OR The red spot (high) should be mounted on the low spot (valve stem) on the wheel.

[/FONT]One has a hyphen? I don't know. I can't talk right how. I'm busy arguing with TJ RANCH about tire tread...:-D


 

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So exactly what is the differance? Yellow dot, Red dot both mean the same thing...
They really do not mean the same thing. The yellow dot is the LIGHTEST part of the tire. The red dot is the HIGHEST part of the tire. I guess you could say the tire is slightly eccentric rather than perfectly concentric. In the auto world the red dot is aligned with the dimple on the rim which the lowest part of the rim. The manufacturers say that if there is a red dot and a yellow dot the red dot rules and should be used for mounting. I guess you could do some research if this is not clear... They can explain it better than I.
 
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