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This is an excellent tip! For a couple of years I had continuous slow leaks on my wife's Toyota van with aluminum rims. When I finally decided to invest in a NoMar tire changer to replace my own tires one of the things I took the time to do was clean the rim bead seating area as you show on your video. I change all my vehicle tires with the NoMar. Since I started replacing the tires on my wife's van I haven't had a slow leak, except those caused by the occasional nail or screw. I use NAPA's RuGlyde rubber lubricant to facilitate the removal and installation of tires. I also use the RuGlyde with a nylon scrubbing pad to clean the rim. Most tire shops will not take the time necessary to thoroughly clean the bead seating area on the rim. In addition most tire shops cannot be trusted to properly torque the lug nuts when installing the wheels back on the vehicle. Improper lug nut torque can result in warped brake rotors.That's another problem I have not had since doing all my own tire and wheel replacement.
 

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Air leaks ain’t the only issue, that build up can also cause balance issues.
Way back in my truck driving days I had a brandnew set of Michelin tires on the front axle and they had a slight vibration, I took them back twice to get rebalanced but the vibration never changed. One day I was at a different shop getting some other issue fixed and this Michelin tire rep happens to stop in, he noticed the new tires and asked how I liked them, when I told him about the balance issue he took a close look at the tires and said they were not seated properly and would you mind if I took them off and remounted them at no charge ? Well the next thing he took off his suit and slipped on a pair of coveralls, he had the tools in the trunk of his car to manually dismount and remount those tires and that’s what he did, he showed me the old built up rubber on the rim, the whole job didn’t take him much over an hour and when he was done those tires were much smoother than they ever had been before.
Since that lesson I have always done a very thorough job of cleaning that old rubber out of the bead area of any tire I mount myself.
 

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Thank Fred, That's a great tip. I have used a scotch pad but with a citrus cleaner, but it took a lot of elbow grease too.
 

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Thank Fred, That's a great tip. I have used a scotch pad but with a citrus cleaner, but it took a lot of elbow grease too.
The first time I cleaned the rims on vehicles I had bought used it took some effort to get the rims clean. The second time there was a lot less to clean up and the job was much easier.
 
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Thanks Fred. I try to clean them, but I've never used mineral spirits before. I'll try
mineral spirits in the future.
 

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Excellent idea! Thank you Fred

Ronnie
 

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This is a really good practice to do.


The other thing I'd add is to inspect your rims for any deep gauges from tire irons that may have occurred and if you find them you can sand them open a bit and or fill the gauges with jbweld or something.


If you change your own tires and do it right, this may not be a probable thing but depending on who has changed the tires on the bike in the past, a deep gauge can create a spot that is difficult to seal with the bead and give you a tire that looses air much faster than it should.


On new to me bikes, I always check the rims pretty closely the first time for damage such as deep gauges, bends or cracks. You never really know what's happened before it was yours so it doesn't hurt to check it out a bit closer the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Fred. I try to clean them, but I've never used mineral spirits before. I'll try
mineral spirits in the future.

Mineral Spirits is the secret to making them easy to clean. Its also a very useful cleaner that can be used on a variety of surfaces without harming them and will loosen and remove both tar and adhesives.
 

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One word of caution using mineral spirits. Make sure any material, such as a rag or scouring pad, that has mineral spirits on it is disposed of or stored safely as these materials could spontaneously ignite. Placing them in a metal container with a tight lid, such as a paint can, is one way.
 
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One word of caution using mineral spirits. Make sure any material, such as a rag or scouring pad, that has mineral spirits on it is disposed of or stored safely as these materials could spontaneously ignite. Placing them in a metal container with a tight lid, such as a paint can, is one way.



Agreed, you do have to be careful with any rags you use until it all evaporates off them. I toss them in an old bbq grill and let them air out.
 
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