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Anyone know of a good tire sealer thats safe for tires with tpms??????? I have put new tires on a brand new 2016 goldwing nav,,, i have had tpms and valve stems changed,,, I think the rims are bad,,,, losing a pound or two every day or so wether its ridden or not. Honda refuses to replace rims,,,, hoping to find a safe tire sealant that will solve the issue
 

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I have noticed that new tires tend to lose air a bit when new. I have also noticed that cheap tires tend to lose more air than better brands. I'd stay away from the sealant and look at the valve stems....put the stem portion in a water tank and look for bubbles.
 

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thats all been done,,, put standard valve stems in,,,leaked,,,, put brand new oem stems in leaked,,, original oem stems leaked all the same way,,,, switched tires to dunlop e4,,, leaked the sam as the original bridgestones,,, really wierd and confusing problem. I never used sealer before and dont like the idea,,,,other than buying wheel assemblies for a bike that under warranty,,, thanks for the reply
 

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Don't put any liquids in your tires. It can cause corrosion on the rim. What you probably need to do is remove the tire and clean off the bead seat area and inspect the bead seat for any gouges.


I have a free video you can watch on how to clean the bead seat area on the rim. https://vimeo.com/ondemand/angelridevideos/319463678?autoplay=1
 

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I'm wondering if the rim was cleaned really well before the tire was installed. Or during install a piece of rubber came off the tire and is stuck between rim and tire bead. Is both tires losing air? If only one tire, look for a pin hole in the rim. Don't rely on your TPMS to determine your 1 to 2 lbs of air loss. I have TireGuard TPMS and it always shows 1 to 1/2 low but as soon as I back the bike out of the garage and get to the gate, the pressure is back up. Then while riding both tire pressures will gain 3 lbs. or more. Only check tire pressure before riding in the morning not during the ride itself other than monitoring the TPMS.
 

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Spray windex o other soapy product works great to find even the smallest leaks in tires, valve stems and wheels.


I agree with Fred.... no sealant or liquid's in the wheel-tire.


Corventure Dave
 

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First, this isn't meant to pick on you, having worked with tires and TPMS systems for a few years I'd like to help you find the problem. Let me ask a couple questions just to clarify. You changed stems and dunked them in a tank of water and they leaked? You changed tires and dunked them in a tank and they leaked? Are you basing the leak on seeing bubbles coming from the tire or stem, or are you basing the leak on what the TPMS is telling you? Last, have you verified the lose of air with a tire gauge? If you see bubbles coming from either the tire or the valve stems, that location is the area to pay attention to. A wheel would have to be grossly out of spec to be the cause, although not impossible, but TPMS systems are warning devices, not precision instruments. I would find the TPMS suspect before the other components with all the new parts you've replaced. When you set tire pressure and ride, pressure increases. When the tire sets overnight and cools, the pressure goes down, possibly below the pressure it was set at.

As to sealants, liquids are thrown to the center of the tire by centrifugal force to seal the riding surface, they don't seal at the bead or the stems. If you actually saw a leak at the bead area, breaking the bead and applying "bead seal" to the bead area of the wheel could solve your problem.

Sorry, I know all this sounds like we're picking on you and questioning what you're seeing, but the answer is in here somewhere and we just have to find it. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
the tires have been dunked and checked and rechecked,,,, a pound or two a day loss,,,, no bubbles,,, nothing showing in the dunk tank, tpms not telling me anything,,,, we tried regular stems,,,same leak,,, my tpms was bad from purchase,,,,so when the new ones came in we went back to oem valve stems,,,,and new sensors, i brought it in for the first service a month ago,,was told tires were in low 30's,,,put on new dunlop e-4,, thinking maybe the three year old tires were bad,,, the bike is a brand new 2016 holdover that i bought in april,,, the dealer says you're at 41 front 41 rear,, i pick up next day im at 38 front 44 rear,,, sloppy,,,
anyway ,,,, i rode this past sunday on monday morning the tires were back to 38 front 39 rear,,, bike sat monday,,, tuesday36 front 38rear wed 34 front 38rear,,,, i know this is a wierd problem usually no trouble like this with goldwings,,, i'm stumped,,,,ready to buy new wheel assemblies , even though i shouldnt have to,,,,but am afraid the same problem will occur,,,,, told honda will not cover new wheels. the dunlops call for 41front 41rear,,,, thinking of throwing em up on 44psi to see what happens. yes checked with two tire guages,,,, i know checlin em while hot is no good,,, hey man,,, thanks for your help with this,,,
 

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As others have wrote, failure to thoroughly clean the bead seating area on the rim is a common cause of slow leaks. It has been my experience that tire installers do not take the time to perform this critically important step when replacing tires. Since I started replacing my own tires I have greatly minimized the problem of having slow leaks on all my vehicles. I did have a faulty valve stem on my truck that caused a slow leak.
 

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I don’t consider myself an expert on anything, but I’ve been riding since 1970 and ridden over 1,100,000 and been dealing with my tires all that time, so I’ll offer a few points, none of which may apply to your situation.
*Have one good tire gauge that you trust, and never go by what another says. I did a test once on several supposedly high quality gauges, and no two read the same. When I have tires mounted, when I get home I set them by my gauge and disregard what the dealers gauge said. Even if the readout isn’t exact, you will be setting them the same each time.
*Any reputable tire dealer who deals with a lot of aluminum rims will tell you that they are notorious for oxidation, which causes them to leak around the rim. If caught early, cleaning will take care of it. Once it gets too far gone, I don’t think it can be fixed.
*If there is a leak, there will be bubbles when submerged in water. A very slow leak will take a bit for the bubble to form, so if you don’t watch long enough, you won’t see it. However, no bubbles, no leak other than normal loss but that doesn’t happen quickly. Normal loss is considered to be 1-3 pounds per month.
*It takes a while for new tires to stretch and get settled. Variation of a couple of pounds is nothing unusual during this settling period.
*You didn’t mention your location, but where I live it is nothing unusual to see a pound or two difference from day to day because of fluctuation in temperature, barometric pressure and whatever other things that affect air pressure. I check my tires every day that I ride to ensure that they are set on the psi that I use before leaving for the day. Unless I see a very drastic change, I don’t give it any thought.
None of this may apply to you or be of any help, but thought I would put it out there in case. Good luck finding your problem.
 
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Here's a stupid question, and I'll ask it because I can. How do the sensors mount? I've dealt with auto TPMS, but ones for the bikes, never. Do they screw onto the valve stems? If so, how about removing the sensor, set the tire pressure, and leave the sensor off for a day or so. Check your pressure and see if it holds. I've seen sensor caps installed on cars, and the cap didn't seal right, so constant leaks. Just a thought.
 

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Cast aluminum wheels might be the problem. Air might be migrating through the porous material. They make impregnating sealants for cast aluminum.

I’ve learned valves stem seals work best if lubricated. I give them a squirt with spray lubricant. Works great.
 

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Was just on trip and stopped at a pilot truck stop. In closeout section ( big box on table ) they had truckers tire sealant . Big say qt bottle . Dont remember brand but said safe for tpms and good for aluminum rims was $ 5 regular $15 i think
 

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What part of the country are you in? Are you checking the pressure in the morning when it's cold? a 10 degree drop in temp may drop the pressure a pound or two if it's very cold.
 

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I don’t consider myself an expert on anything, but I’ve been riding since 1970 and ridden over 1,100,000 and been dealing with my tires all that time, so I’ll offer a few points, none of which may apply to your situation.
*Have one good tire gauge that you trust, and never go by what another says. I did a test once on several supposedly high quality gauges, and no two read the same. When I have tires mounted, when I get home I set them by my gauge and disregard what the dealers gauge said. Even if the readout isn’t exact, you will be setting them the same each time.
*Any reputable tire dealer who deals with a lot of aluminum rims will tell you that they are notorious for oxidation, which causes them to leak around the rim. If caught early, cleaning will take care of it. Once it gets too far gone, I don’t think it can be fixed.
*If there is a leak, there will be bubbles when submerged in water. A very slow leak will take a bit for the bubble to form, so if you don’t watch long enough, you won’t see it. However, no bubbles, no leak other than normal loss but that doesn’t happen quickly. Normal loss is considered to be 1-3 pounds per month.
*It takes a while for new tires to stretch and get settled. Variation of a couple of pounds is nothing unusual during this settling period.
*You didn’t mention your location, but where I live it is nothing unusual to see a pound or two difference from day to day because of fluctuation in temperature, barometric pressure and whatever other things that affect air pressure. I check my tires every day that I ride to ensure that they are set on the psi that I use before leaving for the day. Unless I see a very drastic change, I don’t give it any thought.
None of this may apply to you or be of any help, but thought I would put it out there in case. Good luck finding your problem.
I love this guys LOGIC, kudos to you Smart Guy. You are awesome. I am serious.
 

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I’ve never heard of a Goldwing rim leaking air. Maybe Fred has. It also makes no sense that both tires would leak. I would not use sealant ever, but especially for this unknown leak. I would want to know what is causing it, if it even exists. Plenty of good advice given already...bead, gauge, temperature, etc. I would try to eliminate all those. If it is really leaking it will not stop on it’s own and you’ll be in the 20s at some point. Then you know it’s leaking.
I too have a simple but high quality pencil gauge that I have calibrated so I trust it.
 

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I’ve never heard of a Goldwing rim leaking air. Maybe Fred has. It also makes no sense that both tires would leak. I would not use sealant ever, but especially for this unknown leak. I would want to know what is causing it, if it even exists. Plenty of good advice given already...bead, gauge, temperature, etc. I would try to eliminate all those. If it is really leaking it will not stop on it’s own and you’ll be in the 20s at some point. Then you know it’s leaking.
I too have a simple but high quality pencil gauge that I have calibrated so I trust it.
I did have one. It was caused by crud/oxidation. A good cleaning took care of it.
 

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the tires have been dunked and checked and rechecked,,,, a pound or two a day loss,,,, no bubbles,,,
Now this is illogical! If it's leaking air, there will be bubbles, maybe slow but they'll be there.

Do this on a cool day if possible to limit drying out.

Instead of a dunk tank, squirt a scoosh of kitchen dish wash liquid into a basin and half fill the basin with water. Remove the road wheel, place it on its side. Take a paint brush and slosh some of the soapy water over the area you wish to check and lather up the liquid using the brush. Watch for slowly rising bubbles or frothing. If the leak is really, really slow it may take several minutes for you to realise an area is frothing slightly. Wherever you can, puddle the liquid but be sure to lather it so you can see it rising if froth is forming. You must do the whole of the wheel and tyre meticulously.

I did exactly this to a car tyre yesterday, the leak was at the valve stem and it took a full 5 minutes before it could be seen that the froth was rising slightly at the base of the valve. Such a slow leak as this may not be noticeable in a plain water dunk tank.
Since you're stymied, you've nothing to loose but your time.

I'm presuming you spat on your finger and wiped it across the top of the open valve to make sure it's not the valve core leaking... 'course you have. :thumbup:
 
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