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Discussion Starter #1
My aftermarket TPMS reads tire pressure and temp. Riding today in 95 temps the rear tire got up to 85 C indication. Does anyone have an idea of what would be considered too high?

Dunlop E3 Elite
 

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IronMan
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WHEN THE TIRE STARTS SWEATING ITS TOOOO HOT !:roll::lol:
 

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At 85 C you are still on the safe side of the temperature range, but I do agree with your concern. I have always suspected that most delaminatons of MC tires stem from overheating.

The TPMS that I am using has a preset for the temp warning set at 90 c (194 f) and you are still ok at that point but I would by no means consider 90 normal and would pull off the road to let the tire cool down and look for any possible cause of the temperature rise.

I have asked both Bridgestone and Dunlop about this and neither have been willing to offer any information on the subject.
I have talked to engineers at Bridgestone/Firestones's truck tire division on the same subject in trucking applications and they were a bit more willing to share info, but with so many different rubber compounds and other variables, I would not want anyone to use that info as a guideline. I will sat though that a recap tire has maximum operating temperature that is still below the 90 preset of the Tirewatch TPMS.
 

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My aftermarket TPMS reads tire pressure and temp. Riding today in 95 temps the rear tire got up to 85 C indication. Does anyone have an idea of what would be considered too high?

Dunlop E3 Elite
Just another gimmick to give you something else to worry about.???????? I bet that before you got that TPMS...your tires were the very same temp. and.........you didnt worry about a thing! WHY??????? Cause you didnt know it!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Jerry,
like have the same system you have and it was interesting to watch it. I remember somewhere that racing tires get upwards of 180 F before they get concerned. Almost brand new tires. We ran into one rain shower and the temp went up slightly before falling about 14C.

v8eyedoc
probably right...the Apostle Pail said "before the LAW was given, they knew no sin"...the tires were of no concern at 111F a couple of years ago in AZ but that I can now watch the temp it makes me wonder what is happening.
 

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Hi Dan !
That is just a couple of degrees hotter than what I see when running at 95*F OAT. I have the Smart Tire system and love it. We ride about the same as you ( 2 up pulling our loaded TailWind trailer ) I run 36 lbs psi front & 41 lbs psi rear and have never seen any heat related damage to our Bridgestone tires. Enjoy the ride !
Ken
 

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Tire temp

I saw 195F in a new E3 running 80MPH in 105F outdoor temp. I stopped 10 minutes to let it cool, then slowed to 75MPH. No problems after that. Smart tire system. It may have been fine to not stop, but, better safe than sorry.
 
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The tire warmers, for my race tires, for track days, have settings that range from 160 to 210F. I normally have them set at around 170F with the bike sitting on paddock stands. We try and get the tires and the rims that hot to hold the temperature.

Water boils at 212F, do you think your tires would fall apart if dropped in pot of boiling water? I don't have a big enough pot, so I'm not sure. You are running well below that temperature.

I think I would be more concerned with the pressure increase being too much for the tire to bear.

I know my rear does not follow the normal 10% increase of pressure from cold to hot. I set it at 41psi cold and it regularly gets to 52psi and thats with hardly any extra weight on the bike and a 180lb rider in gear.

Neat little video
 

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85 c

How hot is that in Farenheit, I live in the U.S.

Ed
 

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Hi Dan !
That is just a couple of degrees hotter than what I see when running at 95*F OAT. I have the Smart Tire system and love it. We ride about the same as you ( 2 up pulling our loaded TailWind trailer ) I run 36 lbs psi front & 41 lbs psi rear and have never seen any heat related damage to our Bridgestone tires. Enjoy the ride !
Ken

I had Smartire on my 03 and 05. I loved it too. Other than the sorry design of the sensors, I think it was by far the best TPMS I ever owned. I wish they had not stopped producing it.


The tire warmers, for my race tires, for track days, have settings that range from 160 to 210F. I normally have them set at around 170F with the bike sitting on paddock stands. We try and get the tires and the rims that hot to hold the temperature.

Water boils at 212F, do you think your tires would fall apart if dropped in pot of boiling water? I don't have a big enough pot, so I'm not sure. You are running well below that temperature.

I think I would be more concerned with the pressure increase being too much for the tire to bear.

I know my rear does not follow the normal 10% increase of pressure from cold to hot. I set it at 41psi cold and it regularly gets to 52psi and thats with hardly any extra weight on the bike and a 180lb rider in gear.

Neat little video
I don't think you would see a tire fall apart in boiling water either, but when the TPMS shows a 212 degrees, that is just the temperature of the air. The physical temperature at the bead, sidewall or tread can be much higher. Go to any truck tire shop and look around. You will find lots of examples that show this.

I have long suspected that most, if not all of the tire delaminations we read about were temperature related. Maybe low pressure or overloading caused the tire to run hot, but in the end, heat caused the tires to fail.
If I am correct, then the ability to monitor temperature could save a person from a dangerous failure.
If I am wrong? Well then I just have a cool gadget that throws me a warning now and then and gives me a reason to stop and stretch my legs.

Maybe I just spent too much time in fleet maintenance.
Jerry
 

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I had Smartire on my 03 and 05. I loved it too. Other than the sorry design of the sensors, I think it was by far the best TPMS I ever owned. I wish they had not stopped producing it.




I don't think you would see a tire fall apart in boiling water either, but when the TPMS shows a 212 degrees, that is just the temperature of the air. The physical temperature at the bead, sidewall or tread can be much higher. Go to any truck tire shop and look around. You will find lots of examples that show this.

I have long suspected that most, if not all of the tire delaminations we read about were temperature related. Maybe low pressure or overloading caused the tire to run hot, but in the end, heat caused the tires to fail.
If I am correct, then the ability to monitor temperature could save a person from a dangerous failure.
If I am wrong? Well then I just have a cool gadget that throws me a warning now and then and gives me a reason to stop and stretch my legs.

Maybe I just spent too much time in fleet maintenance.
Jerry
Well, maybe so, but it is posts like this one that prove you were dang good at your job, and are a real asset to the forum.:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Tire temp

My rear tire pressure started at 42 and climbed to a high of 53

C TO F
easy way double C subtract 10% add 32
 

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Am running E3s..rear at 41psi rode for all day and pulled into motel checked tire pressure 10
minutes after stopping 50psi the temp that day mid 70s
 

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My rear tire pressure started at 42 and climbed to a high of 53

C TO F
easy way double C subtract 10% add 32
Well, whaddya know, I learned a new way today. I've always done the old standard "ºC X 1.8-32" = ºF. It works, but is a little more difficult in my head. They both accomplish the same thing but your method is a little easier when doing it in my head.

See, you can teach an old dog new tricks. Thanks, Dan.

Glen
 

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Remember a few years ago when Ford Explorers were flipping over due to tire issues. It happened a great deal here in Texas on I-10. Those tires were filled to max pressure as stated on the side wall. Then people were traveling 85 mph on I-10 between San Antonio and El Paso at that legal limit. Those tires in 100+ degree heat were just blowing up with too much internal heat due to a heavy vehicle causing tire flex, etc. They were the wrong tire application for the vehicle they were put on.
 

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The tire warmers, for my race tires, for track days, have settings that range from 160 to 210F. I normally have them set at around 170F with the bike sitting on paddock stands. We try and get the tires and the rims that hot to hold the temperature.

Water boils at 212F, do you think your tires would fall apart if dropped in pot of boiling water? I don't have a big enough pot, so I'm not sure. You are running well below that temperature.

I think I would be more concerned with the pressure increase being too much for the tire to bear.

I know my rear does not follow the normal 10% increase of pressure from cold to hot. I set it at 41psi cold and it regularly gets to 52psi and thats with hardly any extra weight on the bike and a 180lb rider in gear.

Neat little video
Adding weight (rider/gear/etc) to the vehicle/bike does not increase the air pressure of the tire.
 

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Adding weight (rider/gear/etc) to the vehicle/bike does not increase the air pressure of the tire.
I'm confused.

Doesn't adding weight to a vehicle theoretically compress a tire? Doesn't compressing a tire reduce the internal volume of the tire (at least theoretically?) With the same volume of air in a tire whose volume has been reduced by physical compression, wouldn't the tire pressure increase? (Apparently I need tutoring in physics.)

Tim
 

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Seven year old thread. And yes, compressing a volume increases internal pressure according to physics.

But within reason adding weight and deflecting a tire's sidewall outwards may retain nearly the same volume, just now in a squatter/wider shape, as opposed to the original taller/narrower shape of the unloaded tire. Within reason.
 
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