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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure I'm not the first guy to make this mistake but I'll post what happened and how I fixed it.

I changed out both tires, front and back. When I was inspecting the tire valves I saw the rubber gaskets were a little cracked but figured I'll just tighten the stem a little more than usual. After leak check, I was good to go. For awhile. It didn't take long to develop a fast leak on the rear - a week. One benefit of living in Phoenix is the heat will really heat up the air in your tires increasing the pressure. I didn't plan it that way, that's just how it went and it kept enough air pressure to get me home - unknown to me.

So, second time around to taking that rear wheel off. I didn't want to pull the amp out and mess with all that so I jacked the bike up higher than I did on the original tire change. I'll post the photos. I used the motorcycle jack on the front with tie downs and some weight to stabilize it -the bike wants to tip forward after you jack from the rear. I used a floor jack to lift the bike at the rear shock mount. All that I had to take off then was the rear fender. With the wheel off I used the bead breaker to hold the tire open enough to get the old stem out and put the new one in. I had been using the 90 degree valves previously but they tighten from inside the tire. I picked up 1" straight universal tire valves for a little over $6/pair at O'Reilly Auto Parts. They fit perfectly. There's a little recess in the rim hole that accepted the flange on this valve perfectly. Easy to adjust to the right torque and very solid install. I'm glad I didn't go any longer. A 90 degree chuck for air and gauge just barely works - any longer and that's a no go. I suspect the larger flange surface to wheel rim hole will be very stable an not prone to these Centrifugal forces like the 90 degree valves which have smaller contact area to the wheel.

So, here's the meat. Rookie mistake to not address any sealing gasket, packing, etc, you name it, anything that seals in anything else under pressure. I can't believe I did that and caused myself all this extra work. I'm posting this to help remind guys to not overlook this very important step when changing your tubeless tires. The upside is I did find a new way to lift the bike safely and a neat way to gain access to the valve from the inside. I thought I'd have to pull one side of the tire off the wheel and possibly break the bead on the other side to move it to the drop zone and clamp the sidewalls to get inside. I know, some guys may hazard a warning on compressing the tire like I did with the bead breaker for any period of time could damage the wall or bead, etc. I figured it was a new tire and geez they are stiff as heck and could probably take it. At any rate, that valve isn't giving up any air and I'm set for now. I'll post some photos to show you what I did.
 

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I picked up 1" straight universal tire valves for a little over $6/pair at O'Reilly Auto Parts. They fit perfectly. There's a little recess in the rim hole that accepted the flange on this valve perfectly. Easy to adjust to the right torque and very solid install. I'm glad I didn't go any longer. A 90 degree chuck for air and gauge just barely works - any longer and that's a no go.
I've used the 1" straight metal valve stems from O'Reilly's on many bikes and over many miles with never a problem. I recommend a little blue Loc-Tite on the lock nut. Just remember many compressed air units at service stations on the road have a straight chuck and won't mate up with your stem. Carry a 90 degree adapter just in case!
 

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The wheel won't drop out without using that blue floor jack ? I use a Pittbul lift and have no trouble dropping or re installing the wheel.
 

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The wheel won't drop out without using that blue floor jack ? I use a Pittbul lift and have no trouble dropping or re installing the wheel.
I agree that it will....I have done it both ways....... using a lift and laying it down depending on circumstance. And there is no reason what-so-ever to mess with the amp or rear fender.
 

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Just google "lay over gold wing tire change" or something like that.

There are quite a few videos out there.

One tip - MAKE SURE to keep your arse against the seat. THIS makes all the difference
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I agree stability is definitely an issue. I was very slow in raising it and are used tiedowns on both sides along with some weight to stabilize . Certainly not ideal but if you're careful it should get you through. Mine at least let me work the tire out and never showed any signs of tipping. So yes caution is the word
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I used the blue floor jack because the forward motorcycle Jack could not grab a center of gravity plus I didn't want to raise it too high as I was concerned about stability.
 

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Thanks for the reminder about valve stems. I got a flat on the road last week. Rolled into a dealer 30 mins before closing. Rolled out 25 mins later on a new rear Bridgestone. Riding away I think, doh! I bet the stem is original to the bike, 2006.
Since the front tire was replaced not under duress, it has a nice new metal stem. May bite the bullet and get a new rear stem soon.

I lay the bike on its side to get the rear wheel off.
 

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Thanks for posting the valve stem part number for the 1" chrome stems. I picked some up at O'reilly's today for my spare rim and even enough room for my Tiregard sensor to screw on. Fit perfect in the hole. I keep a small compressor along so I won't need air on the road from a station.
 
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