GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,078 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture.
364926
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,078 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Taddpole,

I have considered doing that. I have a tire in the garage with about 6,000 miles on it with the intention of doing what you suggested. But never did really look for a spare rim.

I have been looking back at my maintenance logs (on the site here) and see it might well be time for new rear brake pads as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
I'd get a new tire and pads. If you don't you'll worry about it on the trip. You don't need that hassle. Plus, if it fails you on the road, there's a tow expense in addition to the tire cost. The cost of the tire, to me, is insignificant compared to the hassle of having to replace a tire on a trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Carolina rider, the TWI is here in the Circle as indicated. It appears that your tread is almost worn flush. Run your finger across it and feel if there is any ridges in. On the side of the tire, you should have also see a little diamond; that tells you where the TWIs are located on the tire.

Check others, because this one is on the right side of the center line, the one on the left of centerline might have more wear as riders have a natural preference to make deeper turns either to the right or left; resulting in more wear.

Long story short, I'd replace that tire before leaving local area.


Greg
2004 GL1800
Rider 123, 2019, 2020 Tour of Honor
Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
952 Posts
Yes no doubt here, replace it and forget it. Make sure your tpms is good. We took a long trip this summer and had new tires installed before we left. The tire shop broke the tpms sensor and replaced it with a dead one. I figured I’d be good till I got home and put new ones in both wheels.
I have never had a flat in all my years riding and guess what. The new tire caught a screw in the rear tire and it was ruined before I realized it was low and pulled over to plug it. I was hour and half to nearest motorcycle shop with a tire. It was very expensive day and I could have bought two new tires and tpms sensors for less than the one flat cost me in total.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
I think the tire has some life left in it but as many others posted I would replace it before a 2000 mile trip. Even if it made the trip I would constantly worry about it and ruin the pleasure of the ride.

Going forward this is what I suggest you start doing. It has worked for me. Obtain a tire tread depth gauge and note the depth of tread when the tire is new. 704's start about 8/32" The tire wear indicators are 1/32" high thus there is 7/32" of tire to use up before the TWI tire wear indicators are flush. Check the tread depth often over the life of the tire. It it takes 1000 miles to use 1/32, about 2000 miles to use 2/32, and so on the tire is going to last about 7000 miles under me with a comfortable reserve. It takes some of the guesswork out of situations like this right before a trip.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
15,872 Posts
I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
For safety reasons, any part of the tire that touches the wear indicator, is the indication that the tire is considered 100% worn out. That is why the indicators are there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Agree with all the above, except the suggestions to keep riding it if local use only. The logic for needing to change it when taking a 2,000 mike trip is the same when doing a 100 mile local ride - safety for yourself and the bike, preventing inconvenience and difficulty resolving a flat on the road, being able to find the size and brand/model tire you want, etc. That tire has $20 max tread remaining. It's not good thinking to keep it on there, whether riding local or traveling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,368 Posts
The wear indicator shown is still slightly below the surface. Treat yourself to one last spirited jaunt in the mountains, if such is your cup of tea. Traction will be great on dry pavement and in turns your outer tread is still like new. If you a more calm and sane rider, change the tires early and enjoy that great new tire euphoria! For the way I ride, that tire has very little left, maybe a couple or few hundred miles, so a change will be necessary on a journey unless you are prepared to change while en' route.

prs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,920 Posts
I think the tire has some life left in it but as many others posted I would replace it before a 2000 mile trip. Even if it made the trip I would constantly worry about it and ruin the pleasure of the ride.

Going forward this is what I suggest you start doing. It has worked for me. Obtain a tire tread depth gauge and note the depth of tread when the tire is new. 704's start about 8/32" The tire wear indicators are 1/32" high thus there is 7/32" of tire to use up before the TWI tire wear indicators are flush. Check the tread depth often over the life of the tire. It it takes 1000 miles to use 1/32, about 2000 miles to use 2/32, and so on the tire is going to last about 7000 miles under me with a comfortable reserve. It takes some of the guesswork out of situations like this right before a trip.
I use similar analysis to determine the value of the remaining tread when situations arise where I might be tempted to wear out the last bit of tire.

If the useful life is 7/32 and you have 1/32 left of the useful life, you have 1/7 or just under 15% of the tire value left. So..on a $200 tire, you have $30 of value left.

Making the decision to scrap $30 max of tire value to be safe and enjoy my 2000 mile ride is pretty easy for me.

Ps...the way I ride, that tire in the OP picture has less than 1000 miles left on it before cords start showing in the middle. No chance of it making a 2K trip the way I ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,078 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the comments and advice. I will have the tire replaced (along with new Honda OEM Brake pad while they have the wheel off).

I do have a tread depth gauge (circa 1996 or so) and when I get the new tire on I will look at the tread depth at the center of the tire. I am curious if its actually 7/32. When I look at the new tire it always seems the tread is not as deep there but that may just be an optical illusion. A tread depth measure will confirm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
The tire is toast. It may well go further but would not be safe on wet pavement.
It's impossible for me to judge remaining tread depth given the angle of this photo. According to Bridgestone the new tread depth is 9/32. I seem to recall the wear markers are at 1/32 which would provide 8/32 of usable tread depth. Others may be able to confirm?

I would measure the actual remaining tread depth over multiple wear strips using calipers. If the average remaining tread depth is 2/32 to 3/32 above the wear strips I personally would not have a concern putting an additional 2,000 miles on that tire. Based on the many responses here I'm in the minority opinion, fair enough.

I had a similar situation a few years back. I ended up asking the service manager at my local dealer to inspect the tire and give me his opinion. At that time I had about 10,000 miles on a Dunlop. and he said 2,000 more miles was no problem. I ended up replacing that tire at 14,000 miles. Getting a first hand professional opinion may help in your decision.

If you don't feel good about the tire, Just Change It. Not worth concern over the tire (warranted or not) putting a damper on what should be a fun trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
I’d order a new tire regardless of whether you are going to change immediately. If a trip is planned replacing beforehand would be wise. Otherwise monitor and have it changed when it’s convenient for you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,870 Posts
My last trip I took to Maine with a semi friend/acquaintance of mine, (he had a tire exactly like the one in your picture) He's quite cheap and also the type that KNOWS EVERYTHING, and claimed that his tire would make through out the entire trip.....Well guess what, he ended up having a flat tire, and almost crashed his bike (lucky he didn't, cause he's also a speed demon/going 85/90 mph on the highway) So not only did he screw up his vacation BUT he also screwed up mine, cause now I had to sit and wait with him, for a tow truck , to come pick up his bike to take to the closest dealer.. I should have continued on the trip w/o him and left him sit alone and wait...BUT what would that really do because, we were on a vacation together, with out plans..So I would have been alone also..He did the same thing, when we were going to Americade together, last year, he show's up with a very,very low trailer tire...(now be advised he only had a years notice that we were going to the Cade together/so it wasn't like it was the spur of the moment decision .....[Myself before we left I removed both my trailer wheels and RE-greased the bearings, checked air pressure in both my bikes tires, changed oil and filter, and made sure everything was 100% B4 leaving on this much planned trip... Never again will I ride with this guy again....
Ronnie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,056 Posts
Personally, I would be uncomfortable riding that tire on a 500 mile trip. I would not even consider taking it 2000 miles. I tried to get the maximum miles out of my front tire last summer on a trip and ended up having to get it changed on the road. It cost me 1/2 day from my trip, I was not able to get the tire I wanted and the shop did not get the fender bolts tight. When I took them off, they were barely finger tight. Did I mention that the wheel weights fell off of the rim too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
You mentioned you would be checking your brake pads for remaining life, which is a great idea any time the wheel is off. We know this is a rear, which has no wheel bearings in the hub. However, it is a really smart idea to check, yourself, the condition of your front wheel bearings when that wheel is off, along with the brake pads. Do not think for a minute this is automatically done by whomever does your work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
The wear bars are usually at 2/32 inch tread depth. I would check several locations (as previously suggested) and proceed from there.

It is not advisable to run with less than 2/32 inch tread depth....!!

A tire will not pass most state inspections with less than 2/32 inch tread depth.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top