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The wear bars are usually at 2/32 inch tread depth. I would check several locations (as previously suggested) and proceed from there.

It is not advisable to run with less than 2/32 inch tread depth....!!

A tire will not pass most state inspections with less than 2/32 inch tread depth.
Bridgestone motorcycle tires TWIs are 1/32" and G704 rears are exactly so.


Minimum Tread Depth




Excessively worn tires are more susceptible to penetrations and road hazards. Always remove a tire from service once the wear reaches the tread wear indicator bars (indicating 1/32 of an inch of tread depth) located in the grooves of the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I am still reading all the posts. I really appreciate the information. I also looked back at my "Maintenance Log" on the forum and its time for an oil change.
 

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I live in Oklahoma, my son's home is Atlanta, GA but he is TDY for the next 3-5 years in Dayton, OH working 12-16 hour days for the city's municipal bus upgrades to all Electric.

He wants me to come up to Dayton in April..... so, I have put on 2 brand new tires for that trip. Even though, I will trailer the bike behind my Suburban ( Medical issues )
but point being, the brief time periods he will be able to ride with me, should not have a tire down experience.
 

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I use similar analysis to determine the value of the remaining tread when situations arise where I might be tempted to wear out the last bit of tire.

If the useful life is 7/32 and you have 1/32 left of the useful life, you have 1/7 or just under 15% of the tire value left. So..on a $200 tire, you have $30 of value left.

Making the decision to scrap $30 max of tire value to be safe and enjoy my 2000 mile ride is pretty easy for me.

Ps...the way I ride, that tire in the OP picture has less than 1000 miles left on it before cords start showing in the middle. No chance of it making a 2K trip the way I ride.
You and Sladep have brought up an interesting way to look at tire life left, converting tread wear into dollars. That's a great way to look at it! When you compare using the last $30 to the possible $200 Towing bill when the tire goes, it really makes you look at the issue more objectively and easily.
 

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You and Sladep have brought up an interesting way to look at tire life left, converting tread wear into dollars. That's a great way to look at it! When you compare using the last $30 to the possible $200 Towing bill when the tire goes, it really makes you look at the issue more objectively and easily.
Yep. $30 is pretty cheap compared to almost any scenario where the tire doesn't make the trip.

Losing a several hours of riding time.

Buying a new tire at whatever price they want to charge for whatever they happen to have.

Potenial tow charge. (As already mentioned)

Plugging a tire on the side of the road and hoping it holds.

Friends annoyed that you are costing them time because you didn't plan ahead.

Going down because of a blowout.

Hoping it doesn't rain because you know the tire is unsafe if it does.

Worrying for 2000 miles about whether or not you made a good decision.

Anyway....for me...trying to save $30 to risk any or all of the above becomes pretty silly so it becomes an easy decision.
 

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I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926

I have gone through a lot of tires in all of my years of riding, and I too ride the Bridgestone G704 series front and back. I average 20,000 to 24,000 miles on my tires, I keep them both at 41 lbs and usually ride solo. To me, I would keep riding on this tire, there is a lot of life left in it. Those treads are to help cool the tire, not just for water control.
 

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I have used a hammer to check tires for 50 years.

Once you get accustomed to the "tone of the bounce", you can easily tell if a tire is low.

I rarely ever, use a tire gauge. Wham! yep, it is good to go.

I set the pressures in the spring for hot weather, and in the fall for cold weather.
 

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I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
(y)Time for a new tire.
 

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I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
There are many untruths I just read as replies. The tire should perform just fine down to the wear bars. Obviously not like BRAND new but just fine. On the turns the tread on the sides are almost new. They will still direct water away from the center if roads are wet even straight up riding.. Judging from the wear bars in the pictures you have easily 2000 miles left. Keep the pressure correct. I had a really good friend who passed away and his daughters asked me to sell his bikes for them. He lived in Tucson and myself and a friend had to fly down and drive his 98 Valkyrie and 03 Wing back to Denver. His tire was almost balled in the center. Past the wear bars. There is still a lot of rubber past the tread. I knew it was 900 miles of 2 lane (route we decided on) and curves. Didn't bother me at all. Had it called for a lot of rain (these had no groves to move the water) I may have changed it there but we had 2 nice day in the forecast . When I got back couldn't even tell a difference in what I saw with the tread. I doubt yours will even be to the wear bars.
 

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I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture]

The bike spends 95% of its life or more on that center couple inches so you are now riding on a worn out tire as indicated by the tread wear indicator. After riding Harley’s for years I was used to getting 20,000 + out of tires. Goldwings eat tires, just the nature of the beast. I had something like 9,500 miles I was told that my twi was exposed, like yours. Prior to that I checked air and even looked for punctures when on the center stand but since 95% of the tread was great I chose to ignore that center wear. I decided to replace just the front. The bike handled horribly until I also replaced the back. So I change both about every 9,000 even if one has a couple 32s remaining.

I immediately notice better handling and a much smoothed out ride after changing tires. I’ve wondered what makes these bikes eat tires but it doesn’t matter, it just is what it is. It’s why there’s the dark-siders among us GL owners on car tires.
 

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My opinion is, change it. And, I am ALWAYS reminding myself, if I feel I need to ask about replacing a tire, then change it. With the reasoning being, if I have any doubt about a tire, err on the side of safety and change it, because the alternative could be deadly.
 

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I have a 2015 Goldwing. It has a Bridgestone G704 Radial as the rear tire. It seems to me that the way the wear indicators and tread design are laid out its very hard for me to determine remaining tread life.

So, the question is, if you had a tire (as shown in the picture) and were planning a 2,000 mile trip, would you replace it or keep it for the trip. This tire has about 8,000 miles on it at the time of the picture. View attachment 364926
That wear indicator is almost at the end of your tire wear,I would be replacing that tire with a new one.Cheers.
 

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At $30 I personally agree a change is "worth it". But what about...$35?...$60...$100? Everyone has to make their own judgement call. Risking the full ~$160 may not even be worth it...where does one draw the line ?
 

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Everyone needs to know within an ish how miles they can get out of a motorcycle tire.

Tire mileage is all over the board. Asking the internet how many miles to expect, isn’t going to result in usable information. Not all ish’s are the same.

The formula should be. ((ish - trip distance) - current miles on tire) - 1000. If 0 or less, change the tire.



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