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I've been reading about how the OEM tires, especially the rear tire, only lasts for about 7-8000 miles. Are there other brands/models tires that are of a harder compound that will last longer?
I run a car tire
 

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Tire service life varies HUGELY per individual circumstances. I see my 2018 to be wearing the tires at a rate very similar to how my 2002 did before I Traxxionized it. I have yet to modify the 2018. I have Bridgestone front and a rear MC Bridgestone in reserve. I have "another" type of tire on the rear right now and it will go a LONG WAY, but does tend to cause the front to wear a bit more quickly.

prs
PR - could you elaborate on your comment "I have "another" type of tire on the rear right now and it will go a LONG WAY, but does tend to cause the front to wear a bit more quickly", perhaps in the thread I started on the "other type of tire forum" : Bike Pulling Hard Right
paraticularly post # 4.
 

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I've been reading about how the OEM tires, especially the rear tire, only lasts for about 7-8000 miles. Are there other brands/models tires that are of a harder compound that will last longer?
Have you ever considered a car tire? I have been darkside for the past 3 years and love it. 30k miles and up and better braking, bigger contact patch and more. I love my Kumho Ecsta PA31 Radial Tire-195/60R16 89V!
 

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I live in a neighborhood that has 45 curves, including some hairpins in and out of the neighborhood before i get to the interstate. Typical front tire life on dual compound sport tourers is about 5000 miles on from and 6500 on the rear. The edges always wear out before the centers. I currently have 5000 miles on OEM tires on 2018 Goldwing and the tires look quite good. The way I ride, dual compound don't seem to last very long.
 

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I've been riding Road Glides for the past 14 years and am looking at the GL1800 now. Been running CTs on all my bikes since 1978. The real problem with CTs is if ya have a warranty. I've had service managers refuse to submit a claim on my extended service plan because of the CT without even determining what the problem with the bike is. They are sure the CT causes mechanical problems but can't tell ya how or what.
As far as performance though, as noted in some of these posts, much better miles per tire, much better traction especially in rain. The load rating is much better than a MT. Heck, a fully loaded bike with two hefty passengers will bring the weight on the rear tire right up to or exceed the load rating of most MTs which is going to be around 700 - 900 lbs depending on the tire. How's that for safety? CTs are up above 1200 at least, on the cheap ones.
Still waiting for that first report of an accident caused by a CT though. tap, tap, tap, still waiting.
 

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Have you ever considered a car tire? I have been darkside for the past 3 years and love it. 30k miles and up and better braking, bigger contact patch and more. I love my Kumho Ecsta PA31 Radial Tire-195/60R16 89V!
One thing to remember - style of the tire does NOT affect the contact patch; PSI in the tire does. If you run 45 PSI, you will have the same contact patch area for a bike or car tire. It is because the air pressure/tire is supporting the same amount of weight (your bike) and distributing it over area at a ratio of PSI.

500 pounds of weight, with 40 PSI in the tire, means you have a (500/40) 12.5 square inch contact patch. Geometry of the tire has nothing to do with it - air pressure in the tire is all that dictates contact patch size.
 

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I have close to 12,000 miles on my front/rear OEM tires and I estimate I have enough tread left to surpass 15,000 miles. And most of these miles are with pulling a Bushtec trailer.
 
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