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Discussion Starter #1
i have 3755 miles on my 2012 wing and just now starting to see a little tire wear on the rear, but the thing is it is a little more flattened out on one side than the other just by a small amount, i always ride 2 up and my pressure is always 41 cold. ive been riding for about 25 years but this is my first wing, the tire is kinda wearing like a sportbike tire to me. thanks for any responce on this.
 

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Betcha the side the wear is flattened out on is the left side (while sitting on the seat) due to the crown of the road being generally higher in the center. That suggests to me there hasn't been much in curved roads and leaning it side to side in the turns. I usually ride two up and occasionally pull my lil' trailer, run 38psi front, 41psi rear and got almost 18,000 miles on the original tires. Now have the E3s and they are doing better. I got those miles with regular pressure checks and haven't been overly aggressive in throwing it into the turns and running high speeds. When I ran a trip to Key West in hot weather the center of the tread was wearing and whenever I leaned in a turn I got a whirring sound from the way the rear tire was wearing a flat pattern. Didn't take too long on curvy roads to get 'r worn down evenly on the edges to stop that. :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
tire

man i never thought of that, i do ride fast most all the time but it has been mostly superslab riding, man been riding most of my life and learned something new(cool). you are exactly right left side sittin on the bike, i thought it might be because of the single sidded swing arm. thanks
 

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" Why is this wear more evident on the left front in most cases? Actually, excessive side tire wear is only evident on the left front in countries where one rides on the right side of the road. Riding right means that the left side of your tire will have more (and likely faster) miles on it than the right side. Left hand turns have a larger radius than right hand turns in right side driving countries, hence you ride farther (and likely faster) turning left than turning right with subsequent increased side band wear on the tire's left side. The left side of your tire has more miles on it (in some extreme cases, twice as many) than the right side of your tire. And the side of your tire only gets mileage when you are leaned in a turn, otherwise, this area of your tire does not contact the pavement at all. European left side drivers find that the right side of their front tires will wear out first. Quite the opposite effect for precisely the same reasons reversed"
Crown of the road. More likely as explained above. Think not-lean your bike over some time with some one to help you not drop it and someone to tell you when it's leaned over enough to be sitting on the wear part. When you see how much you've leaned the bike over, you'll know it's not the crown of the road causing the wear. I was also sure it was the crown until I read the explanation above.
 
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