GL1800Riders Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As a preface, when Lori and I built here in our little corner of God's Country we were not only drawn to this acreage by it's sheer natural beauty and wildlife but by the existence of a high pressure, high volume, sweet, natural gas well generated from a Geo fault turned deep vein of coal.

We have used this energy source to run every aspect of our home. In the dead of winter we enjoy a $50.00 utility bill in the coldest months and that's with a bedroom window cracked open for fresh air while heating a total of 4000 SF. Next step with the house will be a natural gas fired air conditioner unit to radically reduce summer time expense.

Todays celebration is because of a year and a half of information gathering and educating myself in the mechanics of natural gas powered vehicles and the supporting equipment. As I type my 2000 Ford Bi-Fuel Contour is being filled out of our gas well. I had to engineer cost effective ways to remove the moisture and trace carbon dioxide from the gas stream.

Just wanted to crow a little. The hurdles have been many but the result will be phenomenal!!!!

Bradford
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,417 Posts
Congrats Man. Always good to see a plan come to fruition.

Anything that we can do to tap raw resources is good!

Bulldog
 

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It would be possible but Lori would loose her seat and there would be no baggage space left. Now wouldn't that be a fun Goldwing!!

Bradford
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
Congratulations on beating the utility companies. There are one or two houses in the country about 20 miles from me that use their own NG...wish I was one of them. I'm burning corn in a corn burner that sits in my dining room, so at least I don't have to pay for the NG to heat the house (plus, I'm getting the corn for free, so long as the supply lasts). Now, I wish it would produce electricity. :wink:
 

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Believe me Phil, I've entertained that idea too. When one puts pen to paper on initial investment to be totally "Off-Grid" and include the ongoing expences for engine and generator overhauls (even with the total lack of wear and deposits because of NG clean burn) it can't beat the good old Utility Companies.

Now as a supplimental power source and for emergency outages? Well, let's say I have "Feelers" out.

Bradford
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,027 Posts
from a contractors point of view, I'm curious as to how your going to power an air conditioner with natural gas.

York international spent about 10 BILLION (thats with a "B") on a natural gas powered Heat pump, it was NOT COST EFFECTIVE. The annual maintenance costs were will over 500 bucks a year?

It was efficient while it was running, something to the tune of 25 or 30 e.e.r. but the initial cost of equipment ( the condenser was, like $7000 alone, and that was 10 years ago) and the annual maintenance were way more than the public wanted to spend. So as far as I know they (York) abandoned the project.

No disrespect intended, and I'm not being snide. But what do you know that the engineers at york don't. I mean if you can come up with a cost effective way to manufacture a gas fired heat pump, your going to be a billionaire by the end of the year...........dad :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Note to J-Mac Father-in-law had gas air conditioning from a well on his farm. It uses heatfrom a flame to compress the freon instead of a motor driven compressor. served them well for many a year. Just passing along the info. Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Gas-powered refrigeration has been available for >50 years (that I'm aware of.) I don't know how cost-effective it is - the only time I've seen it used was when electric wasn't an option...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,027 Posts
tom smith said:
Note to J-Mac Father-in-law had gas air conditioning from a well on his farm. It uses heatfrom a flame to compress the freon instead of a motor driven compressor. served them well for many a year. Just passing along the info. Tom
I believe what your referring to is an absorption unit. It uses ammonia as a refrigerant.

My apologizes, if I sounded skeptical, when 24 said he was going to use Nat. Gas to power a a/c the only thing that popped into my head was a very big expensive unit that was really good idea, but not very economical? It used a Briggs & stratton nat. gas fired engine. But like I said, the freaking condenser was $7000, add a coil, and line set, and labor, and I bet your going to clear, $12,000, not to mention the 500 bucks a year to maintain the thing.

absorption units have not been used in a residential application for 50+years. There may even be a code against it because of the ammonia. Unless someone has come up with something I have not heard of.......which is entirely possible :oops:

Heck, i hope he does come up with something that works and is safe.
 

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
It is absorption. Servel used to produce propane and natural gas refrigerators in Evansville, IN pre WW II. They have been subsequently bought and resold over the years as well as their proprietary designs and are owned by a French Consortium manufacturing in France and New Jersey I think.

We are looking at an initial 5.5 to $6,500.00 initial investment with an approximate 35% to 40% savings over high efficiency electric units on the market today.

Bradford
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,740 Posts
:shock:

Another "Smart Guy" in so many ways, ya must have a 20 pound head to figure that stuff out. :wink: :lol:
Congrats on controllin' yer financial destiny. :wink:
 
G

·
24 Carat said:
It is absorption. Servel used to produce propane and natural gas refrigerators in Evansville, IN pre WW II. They have been subsequently bought and resold over the years as well as their proprietary designs and are owned by a French Consortium manufacturing in France and New Jersey I think.

We are looking at an initial 5.5 to $6,500.00 initial investment with an approximate 35% to 40% savings over high efficiency electric units on the market today.

Bradford
Servel chillers were sold in South Florida in the 1970's and were part of an incentive program to get people to switch to gas instead of electric.

Not enough qualified people to work on them was their downfall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,027 Posts
24 Carat said:
It is absorption. Servel used to produce propane and natural gas refrigerators in Evansville, IN pre WW II. They have been subsequently bought and resold over the years as well as their proprietary designs and are owned by a French Consortium manufacturing in France and New Jersey I think.

We are looking at an initial 5.5 to $6,500.00 initial investment with an approximate 35% to 40% savings over high efficiency electric units on the market today.

Bradford
Are you going to use ammonia????

I have not heard of anyone using an absorption unit for a residential application. although I have to admit, it's an intriguing thought 8)
 

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
******* Dave said:
:shock:

Another "Smart Guy" in so many ways, ya must have a 20 pound head to figure that stuff out. :wink: :lol:
Congrats on controllin' yer financial destiny. :wink:
Actually Dave it was the 30+ years playing right hand man to my Dad in a small General Aviation Fixed Base Operation in the Midwest where doing everything in-house was the only way to survive. I'm the guy that used to take anything mechanical apart, fix it with no manual, put it back together, take it apart again and put it back together until it worked and walk away with a complete photographic memory to file along with all the other projects I did.

Oh yeah, you can also throw in carpentry, plumbing, electric, carpet laying,maintaining the equipment and mowing 240+ acres and running the snowplow in winter. MSDS file maintenance and all HazMat training for employees.

Then there was moving, storing, flying and maintaining 30 different make and model of General Aviation aircraft. Aviation fuels receiving, testing, storage and dispensing.

As a side note I also lived on the property and provided almost 24 hrs a day security, accomplished marksman with Concealed Carry License for 22 years this year.

My head is a little bigger than most but it is purely a family curse sorta thing.

Bradford
 

·
Gold Member
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
J-mac said:
[quote="24 Carat":r8jh2qgm]It is absorption. Servel used to produce propane and natural gas refrigerators in Evansville, IN pre WW II. They have been subsequently bought and resold over the years as well as their proprietary designs and are owned by a French Consortium manufacturing in France and New Jersey I think.

We are looking at an initial 5.5 to $6,500.00 initial investment with an approximate 35% to 40% savings over high efficiency electric units on the market today.

Bradford
Are you going to use ammonia????

I have not heard of anyone using an absorption unit for a residential application. although I have to admit, it's an intriguing thought 8)
[/quote:r8jh2qgm]


The secret is using a heat exchanger outside to pass btu content from the ammonia to a basically inert glycol medium. It enters the dwelling and voila! No hazard.

Bradford
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,027 Posts
24 Carat said:
[quote="J-mac":18lx0upz][quote="24 Carat":18lx0upz]It is absorption. Servel used to produce propane and natural gas refrigerators in Evansville, IN pre WW II. They have been subsequently bought and resold over the years as well as their proprietary designs and are owned by a French Consortium manufacturing in France and New Jersey I think.

We are looking at an initial 5.5 to $6,500.00 initial investment with an approximate 35% to 40% savings over high efficiency electric units on the market today.

Bradford
Are you going to use ammonia????

I have not heard of anyone using an absorption unit for a residential application. although I have to admit, it's an intriguing thought 8)
[/quote:18lx0upz]


The secret is using a heat exchanger outside to pass btu content from the ammonia to a basically inert glycol medium. It enters the dwelling and voila! No hazard.

Bradford[/quote:18lx0upz]

is this your design, or a factory job? Got a company brand name. I would love to see the specs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Gas fired A/Cs have been around for years Serval was one manufacturer. The gas fired part was out side and used water piped into a coil on the furnace Some used ammonia and others used lithium bromide for the refrigerant
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top