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Discussion Starter #1
I realize that any of the readers here believe in carrying only a credit card and cell phone ... don't bother with this post ...

Then some of you carry a trailer full of tools so you can completely rebuild your bike ... or any other vehicle ... out on the road. You can also go get a coffee ... :lol:

Those of you who might wish to carry a very small but useful tool kit please read on ...

I limited my tool kit to just four pounds of light weight tools that will all fit into SEARS smallest plastic tool box. The box is just $7 and fits nicely under the original rubber strap that holds the owners book and "tool kit" that comes with the bike.

I designed the kit to enable me to remove either the front or rear wheel in case I had a flat and needed to possibly hitch a ride to a shop for tire repair. (I also carry a tire repair kit and small compressor.)

Tools are in the kit to remove all body panels ... and to do possible brake work. I also use this kit to change oil and both oil and air filters.

Here is a list ...
19mm socket ... to remove rear wheel
3/8th to 1/2 inch adapter for it
3/8ths drive lightweight ratchet handle (hollow handle)
11 inch lightweight aluminum extension for the ratchet
(this handles the torque on the lug nuts)
17mm open/box end wrench
14mm ratcheting open end / box end wrench
13mm (same) ... for friends Harleys :lol:
12mm (same)
10mm (same)
10mm open end / box end for brakes
8mm open end / box end for brakes
Oil filter wrench
10mm socket
8mm socket
22mm socket for front axle
12mm deepwell socket for front brake
3/8th short extension
3/8th 8mm allen (can't remember what I need this for :-()
5mm allen key with ball end for plastic removal
6mm allen key with ball end for seat removal
Honda's original spark plug wrench (they got that right !!!)
32 various screwdriver tips to fit almost anything
a really handy "L" shaped tool from Sears that magnetically hold any of these bits in either end ... really a great tool
an extending magnet to retrieve bits from the endless tunnel over the engine ... invaluable !!!!!
needle nose pliers

************
the tools on the box lid I took from the kit ... not needed ... but maybe handy ... what do you think ???
 

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An addition for your Harley friends; I carry a set of torx drivers, there are several locations which require these on a Harley. Have used them to help one student in an ERC replace a broken throttle cable after class.
 

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Nice kit, there might be a market for them.
 

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Good list. I also include a small pair of *****, some wire crimp connectors/eyes, a few electric ties, a small length of insulated wire and a roll of electrical tape.
 

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Unless doing major work on a bike, I try to use the tools out of my touring toolkit for maintenance at home to keep my kit complete.

My kit is similar to yours. I, also, throw in some plastic zip-ties, length of electrical wire, few little pieces of shrink tubing, short role of electrical tape, spare fuses, small/cheap analog volt/ohm meter, an extra oil filter, a torque wrench, clutch/front brake switches and a small tube of lok-tite and never-sieze. I pull a trailer and have add-on electricals hence some of the the wiring stuff. I, also, haul tie-down straps in the event I come home in a U-haul.

Z
 

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Electrical tape is important. My tape is taken off the roll (about 2') and fold it about 3" long, wrapping it around itself... Takes up much less space without the roll. Do the same thing with about 5' of duct tape. The only other addition to this great set of tools would be a 12v test lite.
 

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Nice post and including the picture was a nice touch.

I am more the credit card and mobile phone type but once I filled my 1500 with diesel (to the brim) and the tools I brought came in handy.
 

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A small telescoping mirror tool would be valuable for removing the handlebar switches, finding fumbled nuts & bolts, etc. :p I recently used a mirror when I had to remove, clean, and lube the CB PTT switch on the left handlebar.

I like the statement about using the tool kit that is kept on the bike to perform routine bike maintenance tasks. That method ensures that the proper tools are there at all times.


Since I carry all of the tools, and the Slime compressor in a small Craftsman canvas bag, I put them in the right saddlebag along with other heavy items such as extra water etc.. I do that to relieve pressure on the latch if the bike is parked on the sidestand.


:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the intelligent additions and comments guys ...

In my original post I was thinking TOOLS ... you know ... steel stuff ... :lol:

I also carry my mini notebook computer with the entire Honda Goldwing parts manual and the entire Honda GL1800 service manual on board ... plus wireless Internet service ... :thumbup: ... is that cool, or what ???

I'm going to add a small roll of "GORILLA" tape too ... used a small roll of DUCK tape a couple years ago in the Upper Penninsula of Michigan when my front fender self destructed (result of prior owner's addition of a "fender extender").
 

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As someone mentioned earlier, plastic zip ties are handy. On several occasions they have helped me in some binds.
 

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If you carry a computer (or a smartphone) you might consider taking along those 18 maintenance DVD's. To avoid the bulk I converted the content into MP4 files and gave each a meaningful name. If you leave out ones you would never need (on the road) you can fit the rest on a 32GB MicroSD easily. It also helps to cut the size to 640x480. The play nicely on a smartphone and a PC.

You get a list that starts to look like the picture...
 

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If you carry a computer (or a smartphone) you might consider taking along those 18 maintenance DVD's. To avoid the bulk I converted the content into MP4 files and gave each a meaningful name. If you leave out ones you would never need (on the road) you can fit the rest on a 32GB MicroSD easily. It also helps to cut the size to 640x480. The play nicely on a smartphone and a PC.

You get a list that starts to look like the picture...
I like this idea a lot. Thanks!

I'm wondering if I can also do this with the Honda Service Manual on DVD too.
 

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You can do it with any DVD that is video only but DVD's that mix video and data won't convert. What WILL work is to simply copy the DVD to a memory stick. If its protected (which it might be, most commercial DVD's are) use AnyDVD - it is not free but there is a free trial.

If its not protected, just copy to a folder on a stick.

If your machine does not play DVD's well get VLC Its free and plays DVD well.
 

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Went to sears today and bought one of the utility case. The part number is 965284 and it is $6.99 plus tax. Putting mine together. Thanks
 

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A set of jumper cables might be good to include. Also a spare headlight and taillight bulbs. Also an self contained LED worklight. I have the Black & Decker with the 27 LED's. Nice thing about that is not only does it have good light, but the run time of 7 hours on low is great. Also the charger for it is a 12V charger with an SAE plug, the same as the Slime compressor and the Battery-Tender use, so you can it to recharge the light or run it from the bike if needed.

Those LED headlamps are an idea to consider.

Maybe a few collapsible warning triangles so you don't get hit.

And if you carry and intend to rely on your cellphone, get a charger to leave in the bike.
 

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Hi, I'm seabear, and I'm a tool junkie.

It started out simple enough, I just wanted enough in the way of tools to make sure I could handle the basics on the road. Then I started adding stuff, at first my excuse was that the left saddle bag was just a handy place to store all my tools. Then I was trying to cram a set of jack stands in there with tears running down my face.

So I'm trying to detox from my tool needs, and let's face it, they are not cravings anymore, they are needs. I have tools in there that I do not know the name of or use for, but I can't seem to pull them out of the bag.

That being said, a small plano tackle box, the type with a single layer of movable dividers is invaluable.
If you have to pull screws, nuts, or bolts off of a bike, having a place to put them afterwards is nice.

Oh and Duct tape. It's amazing how many uses there are for that, from patching a tent to fixing a woman's bra.
 
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