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Discussion Starter #1
My 2018 Goldwing Tour DCT has displayed the flashing T(PMS) warning, where TPMS refers to Tire Pressure Monitoring System, a few times in the last couple weeks. The left side of the dashboard says the "RR" (rear?) tire's pressure is 38 pounds per square inch (PSI). If I ride for a while, the warning stops, as though the tire pressure has risen.

FWIW, my bike was born with and still wears the Bridgestones listed in the owner's manual.

That owner's manual on page 233 says the pressures should be 36 PSI in the front and 41 PSI in the rear, yet I'm pretty sure others intentionally ride with different pressures. My question in whether anyone here can justify using pressures different from what the owner's manual recommends.




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Canuck
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I was at a function in which Bridgestone and Dunlop tire techs were in attendance. They both recommended 42f/42r. They said the Gold Wing manual recommendations are based on 20 year old tire technology. They also said the Gold Wing manual recommendations were more concerned with comfort than efficient tire usage.
 

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IronMan
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when you ride the temp goes up ( heat ) so does air pressure = no lite
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here's a stupid question I can't find the answer to despite trying pretty hard on Google for about half an hour preceded by rolling the bike what I thought was a full rotation and looking at both sides. Although I immediately found the valve stem for the front tire, which was on the left side of the bike, I cannot find the valve stem for the rear tire. Where is it?
 

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Love The DCT
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Here's a stupid question I can't find the answer to despite trying pretty hard on Google for about half an hour preceded by rolling the bike what I thought was a full rotation and looking at both sides. Although I immediately found the valve stem for the front tire, which was on the left side of the bike, I cannot find the valve stem for the rear tire. Where is it?
Valve stem for the rear is also on the left side.
 

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Dang!

prs
 
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Yeah, both stems point to the left side of the bike.

As others have stated, as you ride the tire heats up (as does the air in the tire), causing the air to expand, and the pressure inside the tire to go up, getting it above the "warning" level programmed into the TPMS.

RR is the rear tire.
FR is the front tire.

Since the manual doesn't specify otherwise I assume that the tire pressures listed are "cold" pressures.
 

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Love The DCT
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Yeah, both stems point to the left side of the bike.

As others have stated, as you ride the tire heats up (as does the air in the tire), causing the air to expand, and the pressure inside the tire to go up, getting it above the "warning" level programmed into the TPMS.

RR is the rear tire.
FR is the front tire.

Since the manual doesn't specify otherwise I assume that the tire pressures listed are "cold" pressures.
The tire pressures listed in the owner‘s manual are cold tire pressures.
 

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From a cool morning to a fairly hot day. You can expect to see 8 to 10 LBS pressure increase. Usually a little more in the rear than the front. 🙄 :giggle: :unsure:
 

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Same thing happened to me the other day. Flashing TPMS front tire. I turned around and went home. Bumped tire pressure up to 38-41...Light gone.
 

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My 2018 Goldwing Tour DCT has displayed the flashing T(PMS) warning, where TPMS refers to Tire Pressure Monitoring System, a few times in the last couple weeks. The left side of the dashboard says the "RR" (rear?) tire's pressure is 38 pounds per square inch (PSI). If I ride for a while, the warning stops, as though the tire pressure has risen.

FWIW, my bike was born with and still wears the Bridgestones listed in the owner's manual.

That owner's manual on page 233 says the pressures should be 36 PSI in the front and 41 PSI in the rear, yet I'm pretty sure others intentionally ride with different pressures. My question in whether anyone here can justify using pressures different from what the owner's manual recommends.




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Sounds like it's doing what it's supposed to do.
Give a warning somewhere approx 10% low.

If you were to check the tire pressures after a 15 minute ride you will find that the pressure has risen. On the tour model, the tire pressure display should/will also indicate the increase in pressure.

Tire pressures listed in the manual (and service manual) are COLD pressures.
Honda are the tire makers knew the pressures would increase when the established the cold pressure recommendations.
 

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I was at a function in which Bridgestone and Dunlop tire techs were in attendance. They both recommended 42f/42r. They said the Gold Wing manual recommendations are based on 20 year old tire technology. They also said the Gold Wing manual recommendations were more concerned with comfort than efficient tire usage.
Ive tried running 41psi cold in the front tire years ago when it was popular way on this forum to try to stop front tire cupping...all it does running 41psi in the front tire is make for a rougher ride and less grip....36psi does give a more plush ride and grip and is what Honda specs...Traxxion recommends even lower tire pressure for better grip. I always run 35/36psi cold in the front...when the tire heats up from riding the pressure increases to around 40/41 psi.
 

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It sounds like it's working the way it's supposed to. I notice that the TPMS system displays about 2 pounds lower that what the tire pressure actually is. I checked this with two different types of tire gauges... my Harley tire pressure analog gauge, and my Accutire digital gauge Both tire show 36 front and 41 rear on cold tire, but the TPMS system always shows 34 and 38-39. Tires warm up and in 85 degree temperatures the front tire shows 40 psi while riding. I rarely check the rear tire pressure while riding.
 

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International Standards Organization (ISO) defines Colt Tyre Pressure as measured at ambient temperature before any use. That is odd to me as ambient pressure can vary wildly. There may be a more specific ISO reference stating the specific temperature such as 20C or 68F. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) may also have a reference temperature for tire ambient and IIRC that would be 72F or 22C. It has been decades since I have researched the topoc and my memory is not always perfect ;-)

prs
 

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I was at a function in which Bridgestone and Dunlop tire techs were in attendance. They both recommended 42f/42r. They said the Gold Wing manual recommendations are based on 20 year old tire technology. They also said the Gold Wing manual recommendations were more concerned with comfort than efficient tire usage.
Paul, I am not sure with which aspect of tire performance the two techs were concerned. Traction for stopping and cornering may be rediced at that setting and tire life may be reduced due to center of tread wear. Tires and tire pressures are a very important factor in motorcycle suspension dynamics. Perhaps an expert like Max McCallister coul chime in, he does have a video on YouTube if I remember correctly. Then again, if those two tire techs were thinking of how many riders overload the Goldwing for touring and with trailers they may be correct as a means to protect the tires for too much flexing and the resulting over heating. I dunno.
 

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Vendor
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I was at a function in which Bridgestone and Dunlop tire techs were in attendance. They both recommended 42f/42r. They said the Gold Wing manual recommendations are based on 20 year old tire technology. They also said the Gold Wing manual recommendations were more concerned with comfort than efficient tire usage.
I suspect their reasoning for this is due to load and tire temperatures. Tires wear faster and will fail more often when overheated. Running a slightly higher initial tire pressure will reduce the tires operating temperature. While a lower pressure may provide a nicer ride and slightly improved grip, it comes at the expense of higher operating temps. Too low of a pressure could cause overheating and total tire failure. So the tire manufacturer likes to see you run a slightly higher pressure because it reduces the chance of a failure.

Personally, I run 39 in the front and 41 in the rear.
 
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